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Susan Foster

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1996 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Whether or not Susan Foster really believes that a classical ballerina resembles a phallus, she makes the gender issues of the standard repertory a source of witty, provocative text and motion. Launching the "Sweat! (New Dance From L.A.)" series at Highways Performance Space in Santa Monica on Thursday, this locally based dancer, choreographer and academic wore a ballerina-doll as a codpiece and drew extravagant comic parallels between toe-dancing and tumescence.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1996 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Whether or not Susan Foster really believes that a classical ballerina resembles a phallus, she makes the gender issues of the standard repertory a source of witty, provocative text and motion. Launching the "Sweat! (New Dance From L.A.)" series at Highways Performance Space in Santa Monica on Thursday, this locally based dancer, choreographer and academic wore a ballerina-doll as a codpiece and drew extravagant comic parallels between toe-dancing and tumescence.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1996 | Diane Haithman, Diane Haithman is a Times staff writer
'Ballet is woman," the late choreographer George Balanchine once said. But then, who asked him? Certainly not Susan Foster, dancer, choreographer, writer and chair of the dance department at the University of California at Riverside.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1996 | Diane Haithman, Diane Haithman is a Times staff writer
'Ballet is woman," the late choreographer George Balanchine once said. But then, who asked him? Certainly not Susan Foster, dancer, choreographer, writer and chair of the dance department at the University of California at Riverside.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1998 | JANA J. MONJI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What do men do when they hit midlife crisis? In John Bishop's "The Trip Back Down," revived by the Company of Angels, they settle into mediocrity by using alcohol as an anesthetic. If this sounds grimly depressing, it is, but director Lee Magnuson manages to grind out some laughs despite the angry tone of the over-long script.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1991 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
Issues of identity, mastery of nuance and satirical broadsides at the dance world linked the solo programs by Deborah Hay and Susan Foster over the weekend at Highways. One of the founding members of the Judson Dance Theater in the 1960s, Hay brought to "The Man Who Grew Common in Wisdom" a unique transparency of perception on Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2001
Movies Imax goes backstage, onstage and up close in "All Access." The footage shot at mega-concerts around the country features Carlos Santana, Sting, Moby, George Clinton, Kid Rock and others. Opens Friday at Universal City Imax. * "Texas Rangers" stars Dylan McDermott as the leader of a group of rangers battling a renegade outlaw (Alfred Molina) and his gang in 1875 Texas.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2000 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
With high intelligence and deadpan humor, the veteran California-based dance-makers who collaborated on "4 Choreographers / Southern Exposure" in Kaufman Hall at UCLA on Friday used much of their seven-part program to perform dances that doubled as lessons.
NEWS
June 29, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Addictions are largely problems of people who begin smoking, drinking or using other drugs before age 21, according to a report published Wednesday by the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University. The report calls adolescent substance use American's leading public health problem and points to statistics that show an "epidemic" of use among minors. For example, 75%  of all high school students have used addictive substances. One in five meets the medical criteria for addiction.
TRAVEL
March 13, 2011 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
Question: I am traveling to London from LAX in May. For the first time, I want to carry on rather than check. Must I limit the liquids I am taking to a 1-quart plastic bag? How strict is the Transportation Security Administration on this topic for international flights? Susan J. Rainey, Riverside Answer: Yes, 1 quart. And very strict. "When you come through the passenger checkpoint, we aren't aware of where you're going," said Nico Melendez, a spokesman for the TSA. "You might be flying to [Washington's]
TRAVEL
November 18, 2007 | Catharine Hamm
Question: I purchased a SealLine Dry Bag, a sealable sack that I've used to pack wine in my checked luggage. Resealing it involves simply folding the heavy plastic over the clearly marked creases and buckling. Unfortunately, the two times I've used it, the Transportation Security Administration has taken the wine out and not returned it to the bag, leaving the bottle loose in my luggage. I do not think it is an unreasonable expectation to have my wine returned to the bag.
TRAVEL
February 3, 2008 | Catharine Hamm
Should I lock my suitcase when I fly? You may if you use a Transportation Security Administration-approved lock. To see which locks qualify, go to www.tsa.gov and search for "locks." What happens if my lock is cut off? You should return your lock to the manufacturer and ask for a refund if it's one of the TSA-approved locks. If it's something you bought at the drugstore, you probably are out of luck. Should I pack my laptop in my luggage or risk going through security?
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