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Susan Franklin Tanner

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NEWS
May 16, 1990 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gerber Romero, 28, once was happy with his life and work as a teacher in his native El Salvador. But four years ago, the death and violence in that war-wracked country took its toll. "I love to teach and I love to learn," he explains. "But under the fire, that was impossible." So, crawling through the underbrush one night, Romero crossed the border and illegally entered the United States, seeking peace and a better life. That was not what he found.
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NEWS
May 16, 1990 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gerber Romero, 28, once was happy with his life and work as a teacher in his native El Salvador. But four years ago, the death and violence in that war-wracked country took its toll. "I love to teach and I love to learn," he explains. "But under the fire, that was impossible." So, crawling through the underbrush one night, Romero crossed the border and illegally entered the United States, seeking peace and a better life. That was not what he found.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1987 | BILL STEIGERWALD
Two thousand steelworkers lost their jobs when Bethlehem Steel shut down its Vernon mill in 1982. How the lives of six of these victims of economic change were affected, and how they ended up performing in a play--"Lady Beth"--about their experiences, are the focus of "A Steel Life Drama," playing on KCET's weekly "California Stories" series (7:30 tonight, Channel 28).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1988 | ZAN DUBIN
"A Day's Pay for a Day's Art," a two-day conference to be held in Pasadena this weekend, is designed to encourage artists to become more active in shaping public policies affecting their careers. For artists of all disciplines, the conference is scheduled for Saturday and Sunday at the Art Center College of Design. It is sponsored by the TheatreWorker's Project. "Lots of artists are working for free," said Susan Franklin Tanner, TheatreWorker's Project director.
BOOKS
October 19, 1997
Billy Pittard, communication designer: "A Natural History of the Senses" by Diane Ackerman (Vintage). "Perception is reality in my work, and Ackerman tells a fascinating tale about how our senses evolved, how we can process so much visual information or why a certain smell can powerfully stir old memories." **** Albert Revivo, painting contractor: "Man's Search for Meaning" by Viktor Frankl (Beacon Press).
NEWS
April 13, 1986
A special benefit performance of "Lady Beth: The Steelworkers' Play" will be presented by the TheatreWorkers' Project and the Workers' Rights Committee of the American Civil Liberties Union, at 3 p.m. April 27 at the United Food and Commercial Workers' Union Hall Local 1442, 1410 2nd St., Santa Monica.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1990 | JANICE ARKATOV
Sci-fi master Ray Bradbury ventures into the other-worldly regions of musical theater in his 16-character romantic comedy, "The Wonderful Ice Cream Suit" (with book by Bradbury, music by Jose Feliciano, lyrics by Feliciano and his wife, Susan), opening today at the Pasadena Playhouse. The play itself is not new goods. Bradbury adapted his story for the stage over two decades ago--with musical accompaniment that included such popular fare as "La Cucaracha" and the habanera.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
By far the most conspicuous aspect of "Free, Adult and Uncensored" Monday at the Los Angeles Theatre Center was how little things have changed. This 50th anniversary celebration of the stormy Federal Theatre Project was staged as a well-intentioned evening of supportive reminiscence sprinkled with irony, stars and loving sentiments.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1988 | ZAN DUBIN
"Artists are damn fools and deserve what they get. They deserve to be ripped off and beaten down. They deserve to be used and to make millions for others. They deserve it because they are stupid and naive." With characteristic irreverence, novelist and screenwriter Harlan Ellison delivered a fulmination Saturday during "A Day's Pay for a Day's Art."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1989 | SHAUNA SNOW, Times Staff Writer
Some of Los Angeles' struggling artists and fledgling arts groups may now get a small cut of the city's new multimillion-dollar arts endowment. Under the new guidelines adopted by the City Council this week, up to $800,000 from the Los Angeles Endowment for the Arts may become available to individuals and less established arts organizations that, for the most part, have not been able to raise substantial amounts of money on their own.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1989 | ZAN DUBIN
Today we take for granted the things a camera can do, whether it be a photograph of Mars or a human fetus. But 150 years ago, each new use found for the newborn medium meant an exciting leap forward in its evolution. "The Formative Decades: Photography in Great Britain, 1839-1920" at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, is an exhibit designed to highlight early innovation in British photography. With 130 images, it documents an important period of growth dating from photography's birth.
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