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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1995 | ANTONIO OLIVO
Seven-year-old Matthew Flaherty of Sylmar barely noticed the fanfare around him as city dignitaries and local business representatives officially opened the new homework center at the Los Angeles Public Library's West Valley Regional Branch. While the adults nearby praised the fact that, with this new one, homework centers now exist in 30 of the library system's 60 branches, Matthew and his 9-year-old cousin, Ashley Torres, were busy doing math.
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MAGAZINE
September 24, 1995
Having read "The Jobs of the Past, the Jobs of the Future" (by Emily Gest, Aug, 20), I only hope that the author is a rather young person who was weaned on electronic equipment. That would explain her bias and lead me to wish that her look into the future is incorrect. Perhaps she should go to see the current showing of "The World of Ray Bradbury to get a glimpse of what could happen if machines ruled the world. Some people will never be able to use a computer: senior citizens--and we are many--who are intimidated by them; young people who, emerging from school unable to read, won't be able to cope with the 462 different instruction manuals for Windows 95 equipment; people of all ages who simply can't afford to buy an adequate computer plus the programs that need to go with it, and others who won't be able to learn how to use computers at all. Helen L. Manheimer Tarzana In her article, Gest indulged in the most obvious stereotypes about libraries and librarians.
NEWS
April 9, 1995 | MICHAEL KRIKORIAN
CITY COUNCIL * ANTI-CRIME PROGRAM--Instructed the Police Department to report within two weeks on the effectiveness of a trial program that has restricted driving on three intersections along Yucca Street in Hollywood in an effort to reduce drive-by drug sales. Along Yucca Street, at Las Palmas, Cherokee and Whitley avenues, red traffic cones have been posted to limit left and right turns by drivers in hopes of making drug buying less convenient.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Library Commission on Monday changed its naming policy to delete a controversial provision that reserved the honor for million-dollar donors. From now on, the tribute will be offered instead to historical heroes or community leaders. The old policy gained national attention in June over a commission decision not to name the Watts library branch for Alma Reaves Woods, a volunteer who has devoted four decades to promoting literacy in her community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1995 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a $1-million donation you could have a Los Angeles branch library named after you, your kid sister or your company. For $2 million, a regional library. That's the promise of a program the Los Angeles City Council approved Tuesday despite the objections of some who rankled at the notion of letting wealthy donors rewrite the city's place names.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1996 | Bill Boyarsky
The public library has a powerful role in shaping our democracy, particularly here in the Southland, a magnet for the greatest immigration to America since the Ellis Island days. The new Americans have been featured in the news this Independence Day weekend as they waved flags and barbecued their holiday meals. It's uplifting seeing them embracing our country's birthday, a scene as old as the nation itself, but it's just part of the story. The easy part, actually.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1995
The abrupt resignation of Los Angeles Fire Chief Donald Manning, announced just two weeks after voters passed Charter Amendment 2, has placed a spotlight on the people who run 33 city agencies--the highly paid and, in many instances, little-known bureaucratic elite of City Hall. Manning's resignation gives Mayor Richard Riordan an opportunity to put his stamp on the Fire Department by directly appointing the next chief, as provided under Charter Amendment 2.
NEWS
May 20, 1997 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the Los Angeles Police Department to the Department of Water and Power to the Harbor to Housing, many of the most important managerial posts in Los Angeles' local government are vacant or about to be, fueling uncertainty throughout City Hall but giving Mayor Richard Riordan a rare opportunity to make his management mark. Although turnover is a natural part of any large organization such as the city government, never in modern times have so many vacancies come up in so short a time.
NEWS
February 1, 1997 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Billed as the crown jewel of a civic renaissance, this city's New Main library opened just over nine months ago to national acclaim for its daring architecture and bold embrace of technology. Gleaming in marble splendor within the Civic Center, the New Main was hailed as a model public library for the 21st century.
NEWS
June 23, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They say time is money, but not at the Watts Branch Library. Alma Reaves Woods has toiled four decades to promote literacy in her community: She lugged countless books from the cramped old library to pass out at the Nickerson Gardens housing project. She knocked on endless doors begging for a bond issue to build a new library. Now that the library is built, Woods is passing out invitations to next weekend's gala grand opening everywhere she goes--even at a recent funeral.
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