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Susan Griffin

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February 16, 1990 | PENELOPE MOFFET, Penelope Moffet is a regular contributor to Orange County Life.
Susan Griffin's voice is clear but just soft enough to demand absolute attention as she talks by telephone about how chronic, disabling illness has affected her life and work for the last six years. A Berkeley writer who will be the Laguna Poets Winter Festival reader Saturday, Griffin has never hesitated to take on life-and-death matters in her work. Until recently, however, she hadn't had to address them quite so directly in her life.
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BOOKS
October 21, 2001 | LYNNE LAWNER, Lynne Lawner is the author of "Lives of the Courtesans: Portraits of the Renaissance."
The study of courtesans is the study of illusion. How does one describe such concepts as beauty and seduction when beauty and seduction are tricks of appearance and emotion? Indeed, how can one ever know what makes one man or woman appeal to another man or woman? Courtesans render such questions impossible to answer because courtesans were taught to appeal to all things.
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BOOKS
January 17, 1993 | Sandra Gilbert, Gilbert is a professor of English at the University of California, Davis and co-author with Susan Gubar of "No Man's Land: The Place of the Woman Writer in the Twentieth Century" (Yale University Press).
Each "solitary story belongs to a larger story," muses Susan Griffin early in her ambitious, intricate and lyrical "A Chorus of Stones," as she yearns for "a land of listeners, where all that had happened might come to rest, in the intelligent and curious mind of a shared grief."
BOOKS
January 17, 1993 | Sandra Gilbert, Gilbert is a professor of English at the University of California, Davis and co-author with Susan Gubar of "No Man's Land: The Place of the Woman Writer in the Twentieth Century" (Yale University Press).
Each "solitary story belongs to a larger story," muses Susan Griffin early in her ambitious, intricate and lyrical "A Chorus of Stones," as she yearns for "a land of listeners, where all that had happened might come to rest, in the intelligent and curious mind of a shared grief."
BOOKS
October 21, 2001 | LYNNE LAWNER, Lynne Lawner is the author of "Lives of the Courtesans: Portraits of the Renaissance."
The study of courtesans is the study of illusion. How does one describe such concepts as beauty and seduction when beauty and seduction are tricks of appearance and emotion? Indeed, how can one ever know what makes one man or woman appeal to another man or woman? Courtesans render such questions impossible to answer because courtesans were taught to appeal to all things.
BOOKS
July 13, 1986 | Larry McCaffery, McCaffery is co-editor of Fiction International. and
Back in the 1960s, when an ambitious and talented group of "postmodern" writers were calling for fresh approaches to the art of fiction, Henry James (the "godfather" of novelist criticism) was an obvious target for attack. James was accused of being "fussy" and "prudish," his definition of realism was "old fashioned," his approach to aesthetics and culture was "elitist" and "conservative." This was all very convenient: Father figures need to be ritually ridiculed, slain, dismembered.
BOOKS
April 10, 1994 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
AN UNSPOKEN HUNGER: Stories From the Field by Terry Tempest Williams. (Pantheon: $21; 160 pp.) Between Barry Lopez, Wallace Stegner, Jim Harrison, Susan Griffin and others, Terry Tempest Williams is in blurb heaven with this new book. Williams has influenced, cajoled, delighted, annoyed and mostly cracked open many, many readers.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1996 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The women in playwright Susan Griffin's "Voices" speak from a period that has passed. The play was written in the 1970s, and its attitudes and even many of its references are echoes of the women of that time. But, oddly, the play--being staged by the Vanguard Theatre Ensemble--is not as dated as you might expect. Because although these women with their particular and individual perspectives could not exist at any other time, what they have to say about the female condition is timeless.
NEWS
January 23, 1995
The Los Angeles Public Library and the Museum of Contemporary Art will present "Racing Toward the Millennium: Voices From the American West," a new literary series to begin Sunday. The eight events, featuring author readings and discussion, will be held at 1:30 p.m. Sundays at Central Library's Mark Taper Auditorium or MOCA's Ahmanson Auditorium. In conjunction with the series, a group of high school-age writers will be invited to participate in master classes conducted by the writers.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | PENELOPE MOFFET, Penelope Moffet is a regular contributor to Orange County Life.
Susan Griffin's voice is clear but just soft enough to demand absolute attention as she talks by telephone about how chronic, disabling illness has affected her life and work for the last six years. A Berkeley writer who will be the Laguna Poets Winter Festival reader Saturday, Griffin has never hesitated to take on life-and-death matters in her work. Until recently, however, she hadn't had to address them quite so directly in her life.
BOOKS
July 13, 1986 | Larry McCaffery, McCaffery is co-editor of Fiction International. and
Back in the 1960s, when an ambitious and talented group of "postmodern" writers were calling for fresh approaches to the art of fiction, Henry James (the "godfather" of novelist criticism) was an obvious target for attack. James was accused of being "fussy" and "prudish," his definition of realism was "old fashioned," his approach to aesthetics and culture was "elitist" and "conservative." This was all very convenient: Father figures need to be ritually ridiculed, slain, dismembered.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1985 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
Far from radical in both its feminist stance and its use of post-modern techniques, Commotion didn't kick up much of a fuss in a six-part program Thursday at the House. Indeed, the name of this 4-year-old, four-woman, New York-based company ought to read "Co(llaborative)-Motion," for creative interaction seemed more its raison d'etre than any thematic/kinetic frissons.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1998
Television Too sassy for some but dandy for others, Kathy Griffin--with her quick wit and even faster retort--takes her act to HBO. "The 'Round Midnight Special" is sure to flash more adult humor not allowed in her portrayal of Brooke Shields' acerbic sidekick on NBC's "Suddenly Susan." "Kathy Griffin: Hot Cup of Talk," midnight, HBO.
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