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Susan Hough

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OPINION
November 20, 2005 | SWATI PANDEY
This month, a new study challenged conventional wisdom about forecasting earthquakes. By examining the pressure waves associated with 71 earthquakes, two scientists posited that large earthquakes have a different signature "P-wave" than smaller earthquakes, making it possible to distinguish between the Big One and an ordinary one in the seconds before a quake hits. P-waves are the newest member of the great parade of earthquake prediction theories below. -- Birthrates rise more than threefold.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2011 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Sam Allen, Los Angeles Times
The level of devastation from this week's earthquake in New Zealand has some California scientists saying that the state's seismic building codes should be reevaluated to address the striking structural failures seen in Christchurch. In New Zealand, the quake destroyed many buildings of the types that California officials have long said are most vulnerable in a major temblor: Older unreinforced brick buildings and concrete-framed office buildings erected in the 1960s and '70s. There are thousands of such buildings in the state, and many have not been retrofitted to make them less vulnerable to shaking.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2009 | Jia-Rui Chong
More than a week ago, a scientist little known in earthquake circles made a bold prediction of a destructive earthquake in the Abruzzo region of central Italy based on spikes in radon gas. Giampaolo Giuliani went so far as to tell the mayor of a town there that it would strike within the next 24 hours. His deadline passed and for days, nothing happened. Then, early Monday, a magnitude-6.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2010 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
The 300 or so people who live in Ocotillo, Calif., had been on edge ever since a magnitude 7.2 earthquake struck Easter Sunday just across the Mexico border, causing minor damage in the tiny desert town. And then the shaking came even closer to home. The community just off Interstate 8 in Imperial County was five miles from the epicenter of the magnitude 5.7 earthquake that hit at 9:26 p.m. Monday. Experts described that temblor as an aftershock of the April 4 quake in Baja California and said Ocotillo's trembling is far from over.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2010 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
The 300 or so people who live in Ocotillo, Calif., had been on edge ever since a magnitude 7.2 earthquake struck Easter Sunday just across the Mexico border, causing minor damage in the tiny desert town. And then the shaking came even closer to home. The community just off Interstate 8 in Imperial County was five miles from the epicenter of the magnitude 5.7 earthquake that hit at 9:26 p.m. Monday. Experts described that temblor as an aftershock of the April 4 quake in Baja California and said Ocotillo's trembling is far from over.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2007 | By Sharon Bernstein, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Earthquakes that struck Southern California over the last century killed more than 200 people and caused billions of dollars in damage. But new research to be released today says the Los Angeles area may actually be in the midst of a prolonged seismic lull. Geologists examined the size and frequency of quakes going back 12,000 years, finding patterns of heavy and lighter seismic activity every 1,000 to 1,500 years. In a paper to be published today in the journal Geology, the scientists from the Southern California Earthquake Center argue that when the lull ends, metropolitan Los Angeles will experience significantly bigger and more frequent temblors -- up to 15 times larger than the destructive Northridge earthquake of 1994.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2011 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Sam Allen, Los Angeles Times
The level of devastation from this week's earthquake in New Zealand has some California scientists saying that the state's seismic building codes should be reevaluated to address the striking structural failures seen in Christchurch. In New Zealand, the quake destroyed many buildings of the types that California officials have long said are most vulnerable in a major temblor: Older unreinforced brick buildings and concrete-framed office buildings erected in the 1960s and '70s. There are thousands of such buildings in the state, and many have not been retrofitted to make them less vulnerable to shaking.
BOOKS
September 1, 2002 | KENNETH REICH, Kenneth Reich has written about earthquakes and volcanoes for The Times for 20 years.
Earthquakes and volcanoes command much public attention. They have caused countless casualties and incalculable damage, and their dreadful future potential is the subject of very extensive research.
TRAVEL
April 25, 2010 | From The Los Angeles Times
HAITI Presentation Caltech professor Susan Hough will present "A Seismologist's View of Port-au-Prince." When, where: 7:30 p.m. Monday at Distant Lands, 56 S. Raymond Ave., Pasadena. Admission, info: Free. RSVP to (626) 449-3220 or info@distantlands. RUSSIA Slide show Mort Loveman will present "Russia With Love: The Soviet Union That Was." When, where: 1 p.m. Wednesday at Roxbury Park Community Center, 471 S. Roxbury Drive, Beverly Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1999 | H.G. Reza, 714-966-7409
A minor earthquake jolted South County on Monday night, but there were no reports of damage or injuries. The magnitude 3.6 quake was centered about two miles north-northwest of San Juan Capistrano and hit at 11:33 p.m., Caltech spokeswoman Sue McHugh said. Orange County sheriff's officials said they received hundreds of telephone calls about the temblor. Residents reported feeling one quick, solid jolt, Sheriff's Lt. Colin Murphy said. Susan Hough, seismologist at the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2009 | Jia-Rui Chong
More than a week ago, a scientist little known in earthquake circles made a bold prediction of a destructive earthquake in the Abruzzo region of central Italy based on spikes in radon gas. Giampaolo Giuliani went so far as to tell the mayor of a town there that it would strike within the next 24 hours. His deadline passed and for days, nothing happened. Then, early Monday, a magnitude-6.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2007 | By Sharon Bernstein, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Earthquakes that struck Southern California over the last century killed more than 200 people and caused billions of dollars in damage. But new research to be released today says the Los Angeles area may actually be in the midst of a prolonged seismic lull. Geologists examined the size and frequency of quakes going back 12,000 years, finding patterns of heavy and lighter seismic activity every 1,000 to 1,500 years. In a paper to be published today in the journal Geology, the scientists from the Southern California Earthquake Center argue that when the lull ends, metropolitan Los Angeles will experience significantly bigger and more frequent temblors -- up to 15 times larger than the destructive Northridge earthquake of 1994.
OPINION
November 20, 2005 | SWATI PANDEY
This month, a new study challenged conventional wisdom about forecasting earthquakes. By examining the pressure waves associated with 71 earthquakes, two scientists posited that large earthquakes have a different signature "P-wave" than smaller earthquakes, making it possible to distinguish between the Big One and an ordinary one in the seconds before a quake hits. P-waves are the newest member of the great parade of earthquake prediction theories below. -- Birthrates rise more than threefold.
BOOKS
September 1, 2002 | KENNETH REICH, Kenneth Reich has written about earthquakes and volcanoes for The Times for 20 years.
Earthquakes and volcanoes command much public attention. They have caused countless casualties and incalculable damage, and their dreadful future potential is the subject of very extensive research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2009 | Howard Blume
A minor earthquake rattled the Westside early Friday evening. The magnitude 3.4 shaker, which struck at 7:42 p.m., was centered on the coast at Marina del Rey. The Los Angeles Fire Department said it had no reports of damage or injury. "It was a simple, short whomp," said Susan Hough, scientist in charge at the U.S. Geological Survey's Pasadena office. "You're going to have to be pretty close to feel it," she said. "I didn't feel it in Pasadena at all." The Geological Survey tabulated the heaviest cluster of reports from Venice, West Los Angeles, Santa Monica and Marina del Rey. The quake may or may not have been connected to a 3.1 quake that occurred on Thursday about 15 miles to the north, near Northridge, according to Hough.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two small earthquakes rattled the Southland on Saturday, one centered in the ocean and the other in Orange County. The 4.6-magnitude earthquake off Southern California was widely felt along the coast from Santa Barbara to Long Beach and across the entire Los Angeles Basin. The offshore temblor occurred at 1:33 p.m., centered 44 miles south of Ventura in open water due west of Long Beach, according to a preliminary report from Caltech. "Fortunately, the shaking wasn't too bad," Susan Hough, a U.
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