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Susan Kandel

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1995
Susan Kandel has a "Botero" on her shoulder ("Exploring Comic Potential of Immensity With Botero," Calendar, Nov. 16). Here we have a private gallery giving a free show, which can give pleasure to anyone walking or driving on Santa Monica Boulevard, and she has fears about this tending toward the "mind-numbing pleasantries" of private funding! Well, maybe we should refuse what one gallery has so generously set up and insist that only government funded art--especially conceptual junk--be the only art we should enjoy.
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BOOKS
June 11, 2006 | Leslie Schwartz, Leslie Schwartz is the author of the novels "Jumping the Green" and "Angels Crest." She is currently at work on a book about the U.S. juvenile justice system.
JUST in case books written by women haven't been shoehorned into enough marketing categories, there's a new one, coined in the Washington Post. So-called pink mysteries are books by women that feature a female protagonist (miserable love life optional) who solves crimes while decked out in designer heels and expensive manicures. No hard-boiled detectives in trench coats please!
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1994
In her review of an important new show by artist Karen Carson, Susan Kandel misreads irony and sarcasm in work that is baldly sincere, tremulously honest and blatantly spiritual ("Beautiful Photographs of a Beautiful World," June 23). When she claims that Carson's past work has relied on "marked sarcasm," Kandel shows that she has no understanding of the history of an artist whose work has always been daringly earnest and pointedly direct. Carson's stripped-to-the-bone graphic medium presents her simple message: "You are a soul."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1995
Susan Kandel has a "Botero" on her shoulder ("Exploring Comic Potential of Immensity With Botero," Calendar, Nov. 16). Here we have a private gallery giving a free show, which can give pleasure to anyone walking or driving on Santa Monica Boulevard, and she has fears about this tending toward the "mind-numbing pleasantries" of private funding! Well, maybe we should refuse what one gallery has so generously set up and insist that only government funded art--especially conceptual junk--be the only art we should enjoy.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1994
OK, I'm reading Susan Kandel's art review over a cup of coffee ("Visions of Seduction, Repulsion," June 9). I'm sitting in the breakfast nook, my decidedly generous tush in a pair of decidedly generous rumpled sweat pants, my middle-aged bosom a lot farther south than in the accompanying illustration. The snide descriptives--"pathetic," "absurdly bloated," "less failures than mutants," "overstuffed," "with their massive thighs . . . (they) wholly elude the reach of the pornographic"--keep piling up, and I'm starting to wonder exactly what is being reviewed here: the artist's creative expression or the presumed prior gustatory offenses of the models?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1993
Thanks, Susan Kandel! Humor seems to have disappeared from newspapers lately, and your mock review of an obviously imaginary exhibition at a "Grimes Gallery" was a masterpiece of satire (" 'Night': Pop Works Filtered Through a Gay Lens," Nov. 11). You did telegraph your punch by saying that the "painterly incident is due to something as unaesthetic as grime," but this made the rest more reachable. You gave a beautiful imitation of a typically opaque comment by a pompous critic: ". . . Each is a conceptual trope, dictated by a unique, predetermined and minutely calibrated system."
BOOKS
June 11, 2006 | Leslie Schwartz, Leslie Schwartz is the author of the novels "Jumping the Green" and "Angels Crest." She is currently at work on a book about the U.S. juvenile justice system.
JUST in case books written by women haven't been shoehorned into enough marketing categories, there's a new one, coined in the Washington Post. So-called pink mysteries are books by women that feature a female protagonist (miserable love life optional) who solves crimes while decked out in designer heels and expensive manicures. No hard-boiled detectives in trench coats please!
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1994
Re: "Rummaging in the Getty's Storerooms" by Susan Kandel (March 18). The Getty's seventh floor on Wilshire Boulevard may not be the best exhibition site, and the local artists selected may not have the New York art-world sheen, but the double accomplishment of opening up the collection to public scrutiny and simultaneously giving five Los Angeles artists a space should be encouraged, not trashed. I, for one, relished the opportunity to browse through, select and handle the wondrous old books in the collection and am grateful for that experience.
NEWS
May 3, 1990
Inspired by the Vietnam War Memorial in Washington, a wall of 10,000 names has been unveiled in Exposition Park as a tribute to the men, women and children who have lost their lives in El Salvador's civil war. Several hundred Salvadoran refugees and peace activists, along with a group of Vietnam veterans, built the wall in March with the support of Los Angeles City Councilman Robert Farrell. The wall will remain on a lawn next to the Museum of Natural History until September.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1995
For Susan Kandel to label the show "June Bride" at the Sherry Frumkin Gallery as "feminist art" is ridiculous ("A Promising Aesthetic in Feminist Art," Calendar, June 22). The modern definition of the word feminist is the political movement of equal rights for both sexes. This show is far from that definition. Does Ms. Kandel consider the images of this show as feminine? If this is true then when does an image become masculine? That would mean that anything in between would be androgynous.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1994
In her review of an important new show by artist Karen Carson, Susan Kandel misreads irony and sarcasm in work that is baldly sincere, tremulously honest and blatantly spiritual ("Beautiful Photographs of a Beautiful World," June 23). When she claims that Carson's past work has relied on "marked sarcasm," Kandel shows that she has no understanding of the history of an artist whose work has always been daringly earnest and pointedly direct. Carson's stripped-to-the-bone graphic medium presents her simple message: "You are a soul."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1994
OK, I'm reading Susan Kandel's art review over a cup of coffee ("Visions of Seduction, Repulsion," June 9). I'm sitting in the breakfast nook, my decidedly generous tush in a pair of decidedly generous rumpled sweat pants, my middle-aged bosom a lot farther south than in the accompanying illustration. The snide descriptives--"pathetic," "absurdly bloated," "less failures than mutants," "overstuffed," "with their massive thighs . . . (they) wholly elude the reach of the pornographic"--keep piling up, and I'm starting to wonder exactly what is being reviewed here: the artist's creative expression or the presumed prior gustatory offenses of the models?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1993
Thanks, Susan Kandel! Humor seems to have disappeared from newspapers lately, and your mock review of an obviously imaginary exhibition at a "Grimes Gallery" was a masterpiece of satire (" 'Night': Pop Works Filtered Through a Gay Lens," Nov. 11). You did telegraph your punch by saying that the "painterly incident is due to something as unaesthetic as grime," but this made the rest more reachable. You gave a beautiful imitation of a typically opaque comment by a pompous critic: ". . . Each is a conceptual trope, dictated by a unique, predetermined and minutely calibrated system."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1995
Regarding the review of my work at Hunsaker/Schlesinger by Susan Kandel (Art Reviews, Calendar, Oct. 19): Kandel seems to be misinformed about the influences bearing on my work. While I cannot disconnect myself entirely from the aesthetic surroundings of my time, I am seldom influenced by my contemporaries, especially those in the California school. I have drawn consistently for the past 23 years from 17th-Century Flemish art, the Italian Renaissance, Italian panel painting, 20th-Century formalism (particularly the Bauhaus geometric kind)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1992
Susan Kandel's review of artist Paul Kos ("A Clever Fellow," Calendar July 23) was written with flair and elegance, depicting the artist's work using the chess pawn as a symbol of "the weak and the disenfranchised." May we wonder in response if this metaphoric symbolism might not be turned upside down and used to refute the basic premise of the presentation? While it is true that the pawn is the most insignificant piece on the chessboard at the start of a game, we must remember that by careful attention to its responsibilities and by moving forward one step at a time with prudence, the lonely pawn ultimately may reach the highest echelons of power and prestige, the promotion to the rank of queen (or any other piece with the exception of king)
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