Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSusan Love
IN THE NEWS

Susan Love

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
February 13, 2013 | Patt Morrison
And now, she is the patient. For decades, as a surgeon, researcher, professor and medical celebrity of sorts, Susan Love has led the charge against breast cancer and for women's health. She served on President Clinton's cancer advisory board. She set up a research foundation. Her book on breast cancer is on the short shelf for clinicians and counselors. And last June, when, like so many women, she was feeling and doing fine, the diagnosis came. Except it wasn't breast cancer but leukemia.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
February 13, 2013 | Patt Morrison
And now, she is the patient. For decades, as a surgeon, researcher, professor and medical celebrity of sorts, Susan Love has led the charge against breast cancer and for women's health. She served on President Clinton's cancer advisory board. She set up a research foundation. Her book on breast cancer is on the short shelf for clinicians and counselors. And last June, when, like so many women, she was feeling and doing fine, the diagnosis came. Except it wasn't breast cancer but leukemia.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
In the wake of Tuesday's announcement that the Susan G. Komen for the Cure will be ending grants for breast cancer screening and other breast-health services to Planned Parenthood, other women's health organizations have decried the move, calling it politically motivated and linking it to the abortion debate.  "Pro-life should mean not just the lives of babies, but also the lives of women! This is not an either or situation," according to a statement released by the Doctor Susan Love Research Foundation, a Santa Monica-based breast-cancer research organization.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2013 | By Chris Pasles, Special to the Los Angeles Times
This review has been updated. The sound of two women singing in close harmony can give a special feeling of pleasure and even exhilaration. It is a sound not restricted to French art song, but the French especially cultivated it during the belle époque era, 1880 to World War I. This was the era lovingly mined by soprano Renée Fleming and mezzo-soprano Susan Graham in a joint recital Saturday at Walt Disney Concert Hall. The quintessential example would be the "Duo des fleurs" from Delibes' "Lakmé," appropriated as an ad by British Airways for its sense of classy uplift.
NEWS
November 16, 1992 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thursday, 8:10 a.m.: Lucy Johnson's family is gathered around her bed outside Operating Room 2 at UCLA Hospital. In less than an hour, she will undergo major breast cancer surgery--lumpectomies on both breasts and the removal of several lymph nodes. Johnson, 71, smiles at her husband, son and daughter-in-law as they talk in quiet, reassuring tones. But when she speaks, she starts to cry. "I never thought this would happen to me," Johnson says, her voice quivering.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1996 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Dr. Susan Love, famed breast cancer surgeon, author and advocate for women's health, is quitting patient care and resigning from the Revlon/UCLA Breast Center, which she brought to national prominence in four years as founding director. "I have been caring for patients for almost 20 years and personally feel the need for a break in order to pursue other activities," she said in a letter sent to 4,000 patients. Her last day on the job will be May 15, she said in an interview.
HEALTH
February 19, 2001
HARDCOVER 1. "Body for Life: 12 Weeks to Mental and Physical Strength," by Bill Phillips and Michael D'Orso (HarperCollins, $25) 2. "Relationship Rescue: A Seven-Step Strategy for Reconnecting With Your Partner," by Phillip C. McGraw (Hyperion, $22.95) 3. "Sugar Busters!: Cut Sugar to Trim Fat," by H. Leighton Steward, Morrison Bethea, Sam Andrews, Ralph Brennan and Luis Balart (Ballantine, $22) 4.
HEALTH
August 17, 2009 | Christie Aschwanden
For years, breast cancer awareness campaigns have urged women over 40 to get a yearly mammogram. When women hesitate to comply, it's often to avoid the discomfort of having their breasts squeezed or the fear of getting called back for more tests, even if it turns out there's no cancer. But screening poses another downside: A routine mammogram can find cancers that would never have become life-threatening, subjecting women to painful and toxic treatments they never actually needed.
NEWS
January 25, 2001
Dr. Susan Love is this country's best known and most outspoken advocate for women's health issues concerning breast cancer. Her book, "Dr. Susan Love's Breast Book," is a bestseller in the field, and her follow-up tome, "Dr. Susan Love's Hormone Book," takes the somewhat controversial stance that hormone replacement therapy for women is overrated. She speaks widely on these subjects and has testified on several occasions before Congress.
NEWS
October 16, 2010
October may be Breast Cancer Awareness Month, but Dr. Susan Love said Saturday that she's had enough of it. "We are stuck in awareness," the esteemed breast cancer surgeon said as part of "Conversations on Beauty, Health & Wellness," the daylong event sponsored by LA, Los Angeles Times Magazine. But "breast cancer does not have to go on to another generation," she told the crowd at the Terranea Resort in Rancho Palos Verdes. "We can be the generation that stops it. " That will require a change in the way breast cancer research is conducted, she said.
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
In the wake of Tuesday's announcement that the Susan G. Komen for the Cure will be ending grants for breast cancer screening and other breast-health services to Planned Parenthood, other women's health organizations have decried the move, calling it politically motivated and linking it to the abortion debate.  "Pro-life should mean not just the lives of babies, but also the lives of women! This is not an either or situation," according to a statement released by the Doctor Susan Love Research Foundation, a Santa Monica-based breast-cancer research organization.
NEWS
October 16, 2010
October may be Breast Cancer Awareness Month, but Dr. Susan Love said Saturday that she's had enough of it. "We are stuck in awareness," the esteemed breast cancer surgeon said as part of "Conversations on Beauty, Health & Wellness," the daylong event sponsored by LA, Los Angeles Times Magazine. But "breast cancer does not have to go on to another generation," she told the crowd at the Terranea Resort in Rancho Palos Verdes. "We can be the generation that stops it. " That will require a change in the way breast cancer research is conducted, she said.
HEALTH
November 16, 2009 | Kendall Powell
Beverly Howey and her identical twin sister, Karen Duncan-Sherman, each found a breast lump in 2007. Howey's was cancer. Duncan-Sherman's was benign. The two women, now 45, couldn't have more similar genetics, and they live in the same place, Wall, N.J. Why did one develop cancer and not the other? Such questions have plagued breast cancer researchers for decades. Inherited genetic mutations, such as those in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, make up only 5% to 10% of breast cancers. And though there's a clear link between a woman's natural estrogen exposure and her breast cancer risk, there's no magic level that equals cancer.
NEWS
November 16, 2009 | Kendall Powell, Los Angeles Times
Beverly Howey and her identical twin sister, Karen Duncan-Sherman, each found a breast lump in 2007. Howey's was cancer. Duncan-Sherman's was benign. The two women, now 45, couldn't have more similar genetics, and they live in the same place, Wall, N.J. Why did one develop cancer and not the other? Such questions have plagued breast cancer researchers for decades. Inherited genetic mutations, such as those in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, make up only 5% to 10% of breast cancers. And though there's a clear link between a woman's natural estrogen exposure and her breast cancer risk, there's no magic level that equals cancer.
HEALTH
August 17, 2009 | Christie Aschwanden
For years, breast cancer awareness campaigns have urged women over 40 to get a yearly mammogram. When women hesitate to comply, it's often to avoid the discomfort of having their breasts squeezed or the fear of getting called back for more tests, even if it turns out there's no cancer. But screening poses another downside: A routine mammogram can find cancers that would never have become life-threatening, subjecting women to painful and toxic treatments they never actually needed.
HEALTH
February 19, 2001
HARDCOVER 1. "Body for Life: 12 Weeks to Mental and Physical Strength," by Bill Phillips and Michael D'Orso (HarperCollins, $25) 2. "Relationship Rescue: A Seven-Step Strategy for Reconnecting With Your Partner," by Phillip C. McGraw (Hyperion, $22.95) 3. "Sugar Busters!: Cut Sugar to Trim Fat," by H. Leighton Steward, Morrison Bethea, Sam Andrews, Ralph Brennan and Luis Balart (Ballantine, $22) 4.
OPINION
December 5, 1993 | Janny Scott, Janny Scott covers ideas and intellectual trends for The Times
Out the picture window above her desk on the UCLA campus, where she runs one of the largest and most ambitious breast centers in the country, the undulating ridgeline of the Bel-Air hills strikes Dr. Susan Love as looking like nothing so much as, well, breasts.
MAGAZINE
October 3, 2004 | By Kendall Powell
Beverly Howey and her identical twin sister, Karen Duncan-Sherman, each found a breast lump in 2007. Howey's was cancer. Duncan-Sherman's was benign. The two women, now 45, couldn't have more similar genetics, and they live in the same place, Wall, N.J. Why did one develop cancer and not the other? Such questions have plagued breast cancer researchers for decades. Inherited genetic mutations, such as those in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, make up only 5% to 10% of breast cancers. And though there's a clear link between a woman's natural estrogen exposure and her breast cancer risk, there's no magic level that equals cancer.
NEWS
January 25, 2001
Dr. Susan Love is this country's best known and most outspoken advocate for women's health issues concerning breast cancer. Her book, "Dr. Susan Love's Breast Book," is a bestseller in the field, and her follow-up tome, "Dr. Susan Love's Hormone Book," takes the somewhat controversial stance that hormone replacement therapy for women is overrated. She speaks widely on these subjects and has testified on several occasions before Congress.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|