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Susan Massini

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NEWS
May 7, 1988 | Associated Press
Assault charges were filed Friday against a newspaper editor who allegedly slugged Mendocino County's schools chief during a heated exchange at a school board meeting, the district attorney said. Bruce Anderson, editor and publisher of the Anderson Valley Advertiser, was charged with misdemeanor assault and battery and battery committed on school property after he knocked School Supt. James Spence to the ground at the school board's April 25 meeting, Dist. Atty. Susan Massini said.
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NEWS
November 5, 1998 | From Associated Press
A lawyer who served a federal prison term for failing to pay taxes has been elected Mendocino County district attorney. Norman Vroman scored a 52%-48% upset victory over Susan Massini, one of Mendocino County's longest-serving district attorneys. She is president-elect of the California District Attorneys Assn. "I'm very gratified in the trust and confidence that the voters of Mendocino County have given me," Vroman said Wednesday.
NEWS
April 13, 1997 | Associated Press
The theater still shows old black and white movies, and film posters line the walls. But beginning Monday, there will be a new kind of concession stand treat at the Forks Theater, and it won't be popcorn, Goobers or Junior Mints. The white clapboard building is set to become home to the Ukiah Cannabis Club, which will provide marijuana to the terminally ill. Among the items for sale will be "Green Five Star Medicinal" at $20 per gram, "Mexican B" at $5 per gram.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2006 | Claire Noland, Times Staff Writer
Norman Vroman, the unconventional district attorney of Mendocino County who defended the rights of gun owners and medical marijuana advocates and was elected despite having gone to prison for failing to pay income tax, has died. He was 69. A Los Angeles native who spent the early part of his legal career in Southern California, Vroman died Sept. 21 at a hospital in Santa Rosa, Calif. He had suffered a heart attack at his home in Hopland, 100 miles north of San Francisco, three days earlier.
NEWS
October 18, 1998 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here is the Mendocino County district attorney's race boiled down to its extremely odd essence: On your right is incumbent Susan Massini, a conservative Republican pushing for a fourth term, who has been accused of bungling the highest-profile cases of her 12-year tenure, from the slaying of a sheriff's deputy to the prosecution of union activists. On your not-quite left is challenger Norman L. Vroman, a Libertarian who spent nine months in federal prison for failing to file tax returns.
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Was a murder defendant denied a fair trial because of a short-lived romance and a bitter paternity dispute between his lawyer and the district attorney? That intriguing question is now before a state Court of Appeal here in a novel case that might seem better-suited for a television screen were it not for the serious ethical issue at stake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1998 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn writes for the Nation and other publications
It's a stirring comment on the sterility of what passes for political debate in this country in 1998 that Verso's new edition of "The Communist Manifesto" is well on its way to becoming a bestseller. Colin Robinson, Verso's executive director, tells me that he's already sold 22,000, and the bookstores are shouting for more.
NEWS
December 2, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A twice-convicted kidnaper out on parole was being held Wednesday after FBI tests linked him to missing Petaluma 12-year-old Polly Klaas, and grim authorities acknowledged they had the man in custody within two hours of her Oct. 1 abduction but let him go. Sonoma County sheriff's deputies encountered the suspect apparently alone on a country road about 20 miles from the Petaluma house where Polly was taken at knifepoint.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2003 | Rone Tempest, Times Staff Writer
Even in a career championing unpopular causes, Boonville newspaper editor Bruce Anderson's recent defense of a convicted child molester is something new. Three recent issues of the Anderson Valley Advertiser, the iconoclastic Mendocino County weekly newspaper that Anderson owns and edits, have been devoted largely to the case of a former long-haul truck driver convicted in 1995 of charges that he molested three girls, including a 10-year-old.
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