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Susan Mcdougal

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1998
There are two letters April 29 referring to Susan McDougal. One mentions the "prosecutor who has kept McDougal in prison for the last 18 months," and the other "the incarceration of an American political prisoner." There is only one person responsible for Susan McDougal being in prison, and that one person is Susan McDougal. Whenever she wants to do her legal and moral duty to tell what she knows about criminal activity by the Clintons and their cohorts, she will be freed. Until then, I hope that she stays where she is. RICHARD A. PIERCE Burbank
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2008 | Susan King, King is a Times staff writer.
The first thing writer-director Rod Lurie wants you to know about his new film "Nothing but the Truth" is that it wasn't inspired by Judith Miller. In fact, he's tired of denying that it has to do with the former New York Times reporter based in Washington, D.C., who was jailed for contempt of court in July 2005 for refusing to testify before a federal grand jury investigating a leak naming Valerie Plame as a covert CIA agent. (Miller hadn't written an article revealing Plame but was supposedly in possession of relevant information regarding the leak.)
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NEWS
September 4, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Susan McDougal, facing a prison term after being convicted of fraud charges, says it's tempting to make a deal with prosecutors looking into President Clinton's Whitewater land deal, according to a transcript of an interview to be broadcast on ABC-TV. McDougal says in the "Primetime Live" interview for broadcast tonight that she is under tremendous pressure to cooperate with prosecutors.
OPINION
June 7, 2007
Re "Libby term poses dilemma," June 6 If President Bush were to pardon former vice presidential aide I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby because of his record of public service and supposed good works before committing his offense, it would send a terrible message that good partisan soldiers need not fear punishment for their acts. In obstructing the investigation into the leak of Valerie Plame's covert status, Libby was complicit in endangering Plame, every individual she was in contact with during her time in the CIA and, finally, the security of the United States itself.
NEWS
October 4, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
In a jailhouse interview, Whitewater figure Susan McDougal said she has not asked for a pardon and said "I don't see how" President Clinton could grant her one. Clinton "would probably hurt his presidency and his place in history" if he did grant a pardon, McDougal said from a detention center in Conway, Ark., on CNN.
NEWS
March 23, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Whitewater figure Susan McDougal's testimony in her trial on charges of obstruction of justice and contempt was delayed by at least a day after her lawyers claimed that a juror was biased against her. McDougal was scheduled to take the stand in her own defense, but her appearance in a Little Rock, Ark., courtroom, was put off until today at the earliest after the judge reviewed--and rejected--the complaint against the juror.
NEWS
January 7, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
David Pryor, a former Arkansas governor and senator who is friendly with President Clinton and the family of Whitewater figure Susan McDougal, pleaded with a judge to let her out of prison. "I know this family and I felt it was time for her to be released," Pryor said, explaining his Dec. 23 meeting with the judge. U.S. District Judge Susan Webber Wright said Pryor persisted during the meeting, despite her warning that McDougal's case was off-limits.
NEWS
May 24, 2001 | ANN O'NEILL
Silent Susan McDougal, of Whitewater fame, has resolved her legal differences with her former employers, orchestra conductor Zubin Mehta and his actress wife, Nancy. McDougal, who was pardoned of her Whitewater convictions by outgoing President Bill Clinton in January, last month quietly settled the 1999 slander and malicious-prosecution suit she filed against the Mehtas in Los Angeles Superior Court. So ends a chapter in McDougal's years-long trek through the courtrooms and jails of America.
NEWS
December 10, 2000 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Milken, the wealthy financier who went to prison for stock fraud and since his release has become known as a philanthropist, is asking President Clinton to pardon him, Justice Department officials said Saturday. Milken's is one of several pardon requests Clinton is expected to consider before he leaves office on Jan. 20.
NEWS
April 22, 2000 | From Associated Press
Susan McDougal, who spent 18 months in jail rather than testify on Whitewater against President Clinton, will be in San Francisco next week seeking better treatment for female prisoners. McDougal is scheduled to speak Tuesday at Mayor Willie Brown's third annual women's summit. McDougal was a former business partner of Clinton and was one of 14 people convicted of charges related to the Whitewater real estate deal in Arkansas.
NEWS
April 22, 2000 | From Associated Press
Susan McDougal, who spent 18 months in jail rather than testify on Whitewater against President Clinton, will be in San Francisco next week, seeking better treatment for female prisoners. McDougal is scheduled to speak Tuesday at Mayor Willie Brown's third annual women's summit. McDougal was a former business partner of Clinton and was one of 14 people convicted of charges related to the Whitewater real estate deal in Arkansas.
MAGAZINE
June 6, 1999
Ann W. O'Neill writes such a wonderful fairy tale about Susan McDougal ("Steel Magnolia," May 9), but as to the facts: --Prior to McDougal's conviction for multiple felonies by 12 jurors in Little Rock, Ark., McDougal asked special prosecutor Kenneth Starr for full immunity in exchange for turning state's evidence. Starr refused. --The Arkansas jury concluded that McDougal was a knowing participant in an illegal scheme to steal $300,000 from the American taxpayers. She was convicted by a unanimous jury--not by Starr--of mail fraud, misapplication of funds and making false entries and statements.
NEWS
May 26, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr announced Tuesday that he would not seek to retry two women accused of hindering his five-year investigation of President Clinton, a decision that offers the firmest indication to date that Starr may be wrapping up his far-reaching but often frustrating inquiry.
MAGAZINE
May 9, 1999 | ANN W. O'NEILL, Ann W. O'Neill is a Times staff writer. Her last piece for the magazine was about $10-million homes
In a little rock hotel suite littered with court files, transcripts and crumpled soft drink cans, Susan McDougal leaped up from a laptop computer as a scene from "A Streetcar Named Desire" flashed across the television screen during the Academy Awards. "Ah've ahlwuhs relied on the kindniz of stranguhs," McDougal drawled, long and slow with Blanche DuBois, her eyes shining, one hand fluttering over her heart. "There I am," McDougal declared in her Arkansas twang. "Story of my life." Not entirely.
NEWS
April 29, 1999 | From Associated Press
In another setback for independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr, a federal judge ruled Wednesday that prosecutors cannot interview jurors who refused to convict Susan McDougal, President Clinton's Whitewater partner, in her recent criminal trial. U.S. District Judge George Howard Jr. concluded that Starr's office had not shown "good cause" for the court to make an exception to a policy of "not invading the province of the jury."
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