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Susan Miller Dorsey

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1996
Times reporters are developing an irritating habit of accepting at face value assertions made by the people they interview. How else to explain in the story "Many in Valley Back No. 2 for No. 1 Job" (May 12) the statement made by Diana Dixon-Davis, "We've never had a woman superintendent, and if you're looking for who's been left out the longest, it's the women." Obviously Dixon-Davis has never heard of Supt. Susan Miller Dorsey, after whom Dorsey High School was named. Just the facts ma'am.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2007 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
It may not be a masterpiece, but for Janet Horwitz Colman, it's a treasure. For more than 15 years, the Dorsey High School alumna, former teacher and founder of the school's alumni association searched for a valuable piece of Dorsey's history: a 1928 portrait of the school's namesake, Susan Miller Dorsey, the first female superintendent of the Los Angeles public school system. "Most teachers and students don't even know who she was," Colman said in an interview.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2007 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
It may not be a masterpiece, but for Janet Horwitz Colman, it's a treasure. For more than 15 years, the Dorsey High School alumna, former teacher and founder of the school's alumni association searched for a valuable piece of Dorsey's history: a 1928 portrait of the school's namesake, Susan Miller Dorsey, the first female superintendent of the Los Angeles public school system. "Most teachers and students don't even know who she was," Colman said in an interview.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1996
Times reporters are developing an irritating habit of accepting at face value assertions made by the people they interview. How else to explain in the story "Many in Valley Back No. 2 for No. 1 Job" (May 12) the statement made by Diana Dixon-Davis, "We've never had a woman superintendent, and if you're looking for who's been left out the longest, it's the women." Obviously Dixon-Davis has never heard of Supt. Susan Miller Dorsey, after whom Dorsey High School was named. Just the facts ma'am.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1995 | FRANK MANNING
Six young refugees from the political turmoil in Ethiopia will begin a tour today of area high schools to share their experiences. The students are staying with local Jewish American families as part of a program founded in 1992 by the Anti-Defamation League to promote harmony between blacks and Jews, said Marjorie B. Green, director of education for the league. The youngsters have been staying in Israel since fleeing their homeland.
OPINION
May 7, 2013
Re "A field day - not," Column One, May 3 Hector Becerra's article on his day as a farm worker picking strawberries reminded me of a similar article I read many years ago on complaints that immigrants were stealing jobs from American vegetable pickers. In the article, none of the Americans in these jobs lasted very long. The complaints were the same then: aching backs and muscles. And the complaints about immigrants today are also the same. Let's have a guest-worker program and reduce the number of illegal immigrants in this country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2001 | NEDRA RHONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of Crenshaw High School students walked out of class Wednesday morning to protest a proposed name change that they say would rob the school of its history and deal a blow to its pride. It took two hours, several police units and an appearance by Rep. Maxine Waters to corral students in nearby Leimert Park and urge them to go back to school. Students were incensed when they found out last week that administrators had proposed changing the name of Crenshaw to Julian C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2002 | WENDY THERMOS and STEPHANIE STASSEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With a shrinking number of seats available in the Los Angeles Unified School District's open-enrollment program, fewer parents will be able to get their children into schools of their choice in the coming academic year. A steadily expanding student population in the district has reduced the available number of open-enrollment seats from 22,000 in 1994, when the program started, to 5,200 for the new school term. Applications for fall will be available beginning Monday at all district campuses.
REAL ESTATE
October 29, 2006 | Gayle Pollard-Terry, Times Staff Writer
"Live in a dream world high above the city, yet minutes from downtown, Beverly Hills, Hollywood, the beaches." Residents say that ad, written in 1950 for Baldwin Hills Estates, still describes their community. Beginnings Development came to this farm land in 1950. Baldwin Hills Estates was subdivided into lots for homes touted as luxurious, refreshingly modern and centrally located with panoramic views overlooking the L.A. Basin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2010 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
The last battle line in the effort to build the Expo light-rail system has been drawn at Farmdale Avenue and Exposition Boulevard — a small intersection about 20 yards from Susan Miller Dorsey High School in central Los Angeles. If state regulators sign off on a grade crossing and station there, it will clear the way for completion of the first modern rail link between downtown Los Angeles and the bustling Westside. But the plan to lay track at street level by Dorsey has run into intense opposition from neighborhood associations, students, teachers, Dorsey alumni and community activists who have fought for almost four years to change the project's design.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2013 | By Kurt Streeter, Los Angeles Times
At Harvard-Westlake, a private high school in the shadows of the Hollywood Hills, players from the basketball team heaped praise on the alumnus who this week became the first active NBA player to announce that he is gay. "We have a lot of pride in him," Michael Sheng, 17, said of Jason Collins. "He's a hero, an icon for what he has done. " Support from basketball players was more tentative at Susan Miller Dorsey High, a school in the heart of Los Angeles' black community that has long been an athletic powerhouse, producing numerous NFL and NBA players.
OPINION
January 16, 2013 | Patt Morrison
It's a tidy coincidence that Jackie Lacey, newly elected as Los Angeles County's first female and first African American district attorney, is a graduate of the city's Susan Miller Dorsey High School, named for L.A.'s first female schools superintendent. Lacey was sworn in in December, and she's now ensconced in the D.A.'s offices on the criminal courthouse's 18th floor, where her picture will join those of 160 years' worth of white men who've held the title, among them Gen. George S. Patton's father.
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