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Susan Molinari

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NEWS
November 11, 1990 | KIM I. MILLS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rep. Susan Molinari would like to become so powerful that she could change women's fashion. No more high heels or pantyhose. Ever. "When people make jokes about God being a woman, I say, 'I don't think so, because then we wouldn't have the babies or stockings,' " she said. "That was something a man did." She rolls down the top of one black suede boot to prove she's a fashion rebel. "I wear boots all the time so I can wear knee socks."
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BUSINESS
February 23, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
In a sign of its political maturation, Google Inc. has hired former Rep. Susan Molinari to head its Washington operation. Molinari takes over for Alan Davidson, who launched the Internet giant's lobbying operation in the nation's capital in 2005. She will have a more prominent role at the company than Davidson, with the title of vice president of public policy and government relations for the Americas. Davidson was director of public policy for the Americas, but not a company vice president.
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NEWS
July 17, 1996 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The roiling Republican conflict over abortion flared again Tuesday as a leading social conservative criticized Bob Dole's selection of an abortion-rights supporter to deliver the keynote address at the August GOP convention in San Diego. Most party leaders, including Dole nemesis Patrick J. Buchanan, praised the choice for the high-profile speech of Rep. Susan Molinari (R-N.Y.), an energetic moderate and new mother who opposes efforts to ban abortion.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1997 | DAVID BAUDER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Reading weather reports, bouncing a therapy ball and giving a thumbs-up to Michael Douglas--you're a long way from Congress, Susan Molinari. The former Republican lawmaker from New York debuted as co-host of the new "CBS News Saturday Morning" program, accepting a "Broadcaster's Survival Guide" book from colleague Russ Mitchell at the end. "Where were you two hours ago?" Molinari retorted.
NEWS
March 6, 1995 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year ago, Susan Molinari was about to hold a meeting of her close political advisers to discuss the possibility of her challenging then-Gov. Mario Cuomo when she found herself standing before her bathroom mirror with a brush stuck in her hair. "How am I going to convince anyone I'm qualified to be governor of New York with a brush sticking out of my head?" she recalls thinking as she stood there in her sweat pants and sweat shirt.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Rep. Susan Molinari (R-N.Y.) is expected today to be named co-anchor of a new CBS news program and will give up her congressional office by the end of summer, sources said Tuesday. CBS was scheduled to hold a news conference in New York to announce that Molinari will fill one of the anchor slots on "CBS News Saturday Morning," a weekend edition of its current weekday morning show that will join the schedule in September in place of children's programming.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1997 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Thank you for coming. I have called this press conference to announce my position on Susan Molinari, the Republican congresswoman from New York who is leaving office Aug. 1 to join the "liberal media." As you've heard, Molinari has been hired by CBS to anchor "CBS News Saturday Morning," coming Sept. 13 as an extension of the network's regular weekday morning program. After a brief opening statement, I will take your questions. Molinari is a four-term congresswoman whose husband is GOP Rep.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1997 | DAVID BAUDER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Reading weather reports, bouncing a therapy ball and giving a thumbs-up to Michael Douglas--you're a long way from Congress, Susan Molinari. The former Republican lawmaker from New York debuted as co-host of the new "CBS News Saturday Morning" program, accepting a "Broadcaster's Survival Guide" book from colleague Russ Mitchell at the end. "Where were you two hours ago?" Molinari retorted.
NEWS
August 13, 1996 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Susan Molinari, tonight's keynote speaker at the Republican convention, is the first to admit she doesn't exactly come from the wing of the Grand Old Party known for great oratory. "My strength is not in giving speeches," says the congresswoman from Staten Island, speaking fast, her hands moving nonstop for added emphasis. Molinari also acknowledges that, as an urban Northeasterner who supports abortion rights and gun control, some might see her as a Republican anomaly.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1997 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two of CBS News' new employees spelled out their career goals Thursday, with U.S. Rep. Susan Molinari coming about as close as a politician can to ruling out any future bid for public office, while former "Today" show host Bryant Gumbel stated that he has no designs on Dan Rather's job anchoring "The CBS Evening News."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1997 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When CBS announced last spring that it had hired Rep. Susan Molinari (R-N.Y.) to co-anchor a Saturday morning news show, the reception from many reporters was, "How could you?" "How can you make her an 'anchor' when she hasn't put in any time in the news business, when she's absolutely an amateur?" was the first question addressed to CBS News President Andrew Heyward by a local TV reporter at a press conference here. The 39-year-old Molinari was surprised by the attacks.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1997 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two of CBS News' new employees spelled out their career goals Thursday, with U.S. Rep. Susan Molinari coming about as close as a politician can to ruling out any future bid for public office, while former "Today" show host Bryant Gumbel stated that he has no designs on Dan Rather's job anchoring "The CBS Evening News."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1997 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Thank you for coming. I have called this press conference to announce my position on Susan Molinari, the Republican congresswoman from New York who is leaving office Aug. 1 to join the "liberal media." As you've heard, Molinari has been hired by CBS to anchor "CBS News Saturday Morning," coming Sept. 13 as an extension of the network's regular weekday morning program. After a brief opening statement, I will take your questions. Molinari is a four-term congresswoman whose husband is GOP Rep.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Rep. Susan Molinari (R-N.Y.) is expected today to be named co-anchor of a new CBS news program and will give up her congressional office by the end of summer, sources said Tuesday. CBS was scheduled to hold a news conference in New York to announce that Molinari will fill one of the anchor slots on "CBS News Saturday Morning," a weekend edition of its current weekday morning show that will join the schedule in September in place of children's programming.
NEWS
August 14, 1996 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Finding new unity in their shared distaste for President Clinton, Republicans on Tuesday evening gleefully attacked the Democrat's record on everything from taxes to crime to welfare reform, and promised that a Bob Dole presidency would "restore the American dream." "Bill Clinton . . . promises one thing and does another," said Rep. Susan Molinari (R-N.Y.), the keynote speaker on the second day of the Republican National Convention. "He hopes we will forget his broken promises. But . . .
NEWS
August 13, 1996 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Susan Molinari, tonight's keynote speaker at the Republican convention, is the first to admit she doesn't exactly come from the wing of the Grand Old Party known for great oratory. "My strength is not in giving speeches," says the congresswoman from Staten Island, speaking fast, her hands moving nonstop for added emphasis. Molinari also acknowledges that, as an urban Northeasterner who supports abortion rights and gun control, some might see her as a Republican anomaly.
NEWS
August 14, 1996 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Finding new unity in their shared distaste for President Clinton, Republicans on Tuesday evening gleefully attacked the Democrat's record on everything from taxes to crime to welfare reform, and promised that a Bob Dole presidency would "restore the American dream." "Bill Clinton . . . promises one thing and does another," said Rep. Susan Molinari (R-N.Y.), the keynote speaker on the second day of the Republican National Convention. "He hopes we will forget his broken promises. But . . .
BUSINESS
February 23, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
In a sign of its political maturation, Google Inc. has hired former Rep. Susan Molinari to head its Washington operation. Molinari takes over for Alan Davidson, who launched the Internet giant's lobbying operation in the nation's capital in 2005. She will have a more prominent role at the company than Davidson, with the title of vice president of public policy and government relations for the Americas. Davidson was director of public policy for the Americas, but not a company vice president.
NEWS
July 17, 1996 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The roiling Republican conflict over abortion flared again Tuesday as a leading social conservative criticized Bob Dole's selection of an abortion-rights supporter to deliver the keynote address at the August GOP convention in San Diego. Most party leaders, including Dole nemesis Patrick J. Buchanan, praised the choice for the high-profile speech of Rep. Susan Molinari (R-N.Y.), an energetic moderate and new mother who opposes efforts to ban abortion.
NEWS
March 6, 1995 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year ago, Susan Molinari was about to hold a meeting of her close political advisers to discuss the possibility of her challenging then-Gov. Mario Cuomo when she found herself standing before her bathroom mirror with a brush stuck in her hair. "How am I going to convince anyone I'm qualified to be governor of New York with a brush sticking out of my head?" she recalls thinking as she stood there in her sweat pants and sweat shirt.
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