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December 29, 1989 | SUZETTE PARMLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After Eileen Franklin-Lipsker witnessed the murder of her best friend, she wondered why no one, including police investigators, thought to question her because she was only 8 years old. Now, at 29, she will finally testify, and what she will say, she promises, is that the man she saw commit the crime was her own father. Franklin-Lipsker, who came forward with her accusation for the first time last month, is the key witness against George Thomas Franklin Sr., 50, a former San Mateo firefighter.
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NEWS
December 29, 1989 | SUZETTE PARMLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After Eileen Franklin-Lipsker witnessed the murder of her best friend, she wondered why no one, including police investigators, thought to question her because she was only 8 years old. Now, at 29, she will finally testify, and what she will say, she promises, is that the man she saw commit the crime was her own father. Franklin-Lipsker, who came forward with her accusation for the first time last month, is the key witness against George Thomas Franklin Sr., 50, a former San Mateo firefighter.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal appeals court agreed Wednesday with a lower court's decision to throw out a civil rights lawsuit brought by the first man convicted of murder after testimony based on repressed memories. George Franklin was convicted in 1990 after his daughter, Eileen Franklin Lipsker, said more than 20 years after the murder that she recalled seeing her father crush 8-year-old Susan Nason's skull with a rock. The U.S.
NEWS
December 25, 1995 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the annals of criminal law, there has never been anything quite like the case of the People vs. George Thomas Franklin Sr. Franklin, a craggy-faced middle-aged man, was living near Sacramento in 1989 when his grown daughter, Eileen Franklin-Lipsker of Canoga Park, came forward and told an incredible tale. As a child 20 years earlier, she said, she witnessed her father rape her childhood friend, 8-year-old Susan Nason, then smash the little girl's skull with a rock.
NEWS
November 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
Eileen Franklin-Lipsker, who has accused her father of molesting and killing her playmate 21 years ago, testified Monday that she watched in terror as he smashed the little girl's skull with a rock. "Her hands flew up to her head. . . . The next thing I heard was two blows. It sounded terrible," testified Franklin-Lipsker, whose best friend, Susan Nason, was slain Sept. 22, 1969. George Franklin Sr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1996 | Associated Press
A woman who accused her father of murder after she recalled the incident decades later says she does not want to testify at her father's retrial, defense lawyers said. Eileen Franklin-Lipsker told investigators during interviews that she did not want to take the stand in her father's Sept. 16 retrial, said Dylan Schafer, one of George Franklin's lawyers. Schafer said the statements were included in discovery evidence his office received from prosecutors.
NEWS
December 1, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A retired firefighter was convicted on Friday of murder after his daughter testified that she witnessed the killing of her girlfriend 21 years ago but had repressed it until after she became a parent. Eileen Franklin-Lipsker, now 30, told a bizarre and shocking tale in the San Mateo County Courthouse of how as a girl of 8, she watched in horror as her father, George Franklin, crashed a rock into the skull of Susan Nason, her best childhood friend in September, 1969.
NEWS
November 21, 1995 | From Associated Press
A San Mateo man whose murder conviction was overturned after it was based on his daughter's 20-year-old repressed memory is entitled to a new trial, a federal appeals court agreed Monday. George T. Franklin's conviction had been overturned by a federal judge, and on Monday the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld that ruling, citing flawed evidence. The case had gained national notoriety and been the subject of a TV movie.
NEWS
July 1, 1997 | From Associated Press
George Franklin, whose murder conviction based on his daughter's repressed-memory testimony was overturned, filed a damage suit Monday accusing his daughter and prosecutors of conspiring to violate his rights. In Franklin's first public appearance since his release from prison a year ago, his lawyers reported that he had passed a lie detector test in which he denied murdering his daughter's 8-year-old playmate.
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