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Susan Orlean

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2002 | Lauren Sandler
Susan Orlean is a literary journalist who expanded her New Yorker story about a man arrested for stealing rare orchids into the best-selling book "The Orchid Thief." When "Being John Malkovich" writer Charlie Kaufman was given the job of adapting Orlean's book, he became blocked, obsessed with Orlean and with himself, and ended up expanding and fictionalizing their lives into the script for "Adaptation." For Orlean, it has been a truly postmodern experience. In "Adaptation," not only does Charlie Kaufman write himself into the script, but he writes you in as well.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend Susan Orlean Simon & Schuster: 288 pp., $26.99 They called him the Dog Wonder, the Mastermind Dog, America's Greatest Movie Dog. He was listed in the Los Angeles phone book, made more money than his human costars and actually came unnervingly close to winning the first Academy Award for actor. He was Rin Tin Tin and, as Susan Orlean puts it, "He was something you could dream about. He could leap twelve feet, and he could leap through time.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
With a dog at her feet and an advance copy of her book "Rin Tin Tin" on the table, Susan Orlean sips coffee in the backyard of the Los Angeles house she now calls home. In September, the New Yorker staff writer, whose book "The Orchid Thief" was the (sort of) basis for the film "Adaptation," left rural New York behind. For the next year, she, her husband and son will be calling themselves Angelenos, thanks partly to the movie-star dog and Orlean's responsibilities as a working mother. "I started being inflamed with the idea that Rin Tin Tin was a great story, but I didn't know what the story was, of course," says Orlean, who begins all her work with lively curiosity before plunging into the unknown.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
With a dog at her feet and an advance copy of her book "Rin Tin Tin" on the table, Susan Orlean sips coffee in the backyard of the Los Angeles house she now calls home. In September, the New Yorker staff writer, whose book "The Orchid Thief" was the (sort of) basis for the film "Adaptation," left rural New York behind. For the next year, she, her husband and son will be calling themselves Angelenos, thanks partly to the movie-star dog and Orlean's responsibilities as a working mother. "I started being inflamed with the idea that Rin Tin Tin was a great story, but I didn't know what the story was, of course," says Orlean, who begins all her work with lively curiosity before plunging into the unknown.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2006 | Ann Hornaday, Washington Post
Do you idolspize? Or, more to the point, whom do you idolspize? Let me explain. It recently became clear to me that modern life has spawned a brand new emotion, that psychological sidewalk-crack between envy and idolatry that we often succeed in jumping over but once in a while fall right through. That's where we meet them, those of superior beauty, character, talent and intelligence and, if friends, who are never less than loyal, supportive, generous and kind. For this we loathe them.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2002 | Elaine Dutka, Times Staff Writer
It was a roll of the dice for director Spike Jonze, casting Chris Cooper, an actor identified mostly with button-down roles, as the skanky South Florida wild man John Laroche in his new film "Adaptation." As portrayed on-screen, the freewheeling orchid expert is part scientist, part con man -- and sexy, even though he's missing his front teeth. "Laroche could have been played as a swaggering cartoon character -- the cat that swallowed the canary," Jonze said.
BOOKS
February 21, 1999 | DREW FETHERSTON, Drew Fetherston is the author of "The Chunnel" and is working on a book about the flower industry
If you're tempted to think that Susan Orlean has boosted the octane in this fascinating book--that her tales of theft, hatred, greed, jealousy, madness and back-stabbing in the hothouse world of the Florida orchid trade have been heightened for dramatic effect--consider this: After finishing "The Orchid Thief," I stopped at a small orchid shop in a city more than 1,000 miles from the scene of the crimes and quirks recounted by Orlean.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend Susan Orlean Simon & Schuster: 288 pp., $26.99 They called him the Dog Wonder, the Mastermind Dog, America's Greatest Movie Dog. He was listed in the Los Angeles phone book, made more money than his human costars and actually came unnervingly close to winning the first Academy Award for actor. He was Rin Tin Tin and, as Susan Orlean puts it, "He was something you could dream about. He could leap twelve feet, and he could leap through time.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2005 | From Associated Press
Jonathan Karp, the editor of "Seabiscuit," "The Orchid Thief" and many other bestsellers at Random House., will run his own imprint at Warner Books. Karp, who left Random House in June, has been named publisher and editor-in-chief of Warner Twelve, which will release 12 books a year. The 41-year-old Karp was in his mid-20s when he joined Random House as an editorial assistant and soon displayed a knack for spotting bestsellers, especially narrative nonfiction.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
If you weren't watching the Colbert Report on Tuesday night, you missed Stephen Colbert poking fun at author Malcolm Gladwell's shock of curly hair. Gladwell, for his part, looked kind of uncomfortable, and didn't even try to make a hair joke in return. The occasion was "The Big New Yorker Book of Dogs," to which Gladwell wrote the foreword. Gladwell doesn't have a dog, but he likes them, and he's a New Yorker writer -- so there he was, shifting uneasily in the Colbert hot seat.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2006 | Ann Hornaday, Washington Post
Do you idolspize? Or, more to the point, whom do you idolspize? Let me explain. It recently became clear to me that modern life has spawned a brand new emotion, that psychological sidewalk-crack between envy and idolatry that we often succeed in jumping over but once in a while fall right through. That's where we meet them, those of superior beauty, character, talent and intelligence and, if friends, who are never less than loyal, supportive, generous and kind. For this we loathe them.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2002 | Elaine Dutka, Times Staff Writer
It was a roll of the dice for director Spike Jonze, casting Chris Cooper, an actor identified mostly with button-down roles, as the skanky South Florida wild man John Laroche in his new film "Adaptation." As portrayed on-screen, the freewheeling orchid expert is part scientist, part con man -- and sexy, even though he's missing his front teeth. "Laroche could have been played as a swaggering cartoon character -- the cat that swallowed the canary," Jonze said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2002 | Lauren Sandler
Susan Orlean is a literary journalist who expanded her New Yorker story about a man arrested for stealing rare orchids into the best-selling book "The Orchid Thief." When "Being John Malkovich" writer Charlie Kaufman was given the job of adapting Orlean's book, he became blocked, obsessed with Orlean and with himself, and ended up expanding and fictionalizing their lives into the script for "Adaptation." For Orlean, it has been a truly postmodern experience. In "Adaptation," not only does Charlie Kaufman write himself into the script, but he writes you in as well.
BOOKS
February 21, 1999 | DREW FETHERSTON, Drew Fetherston is the author of "The Chunnel" and is working on a book about the flower industry
If you're tempted to think that Susan Orlean has boosted the octane in this fascinating book--that her tales of theft, hatred, greed, jealousy, madness and back-stabbing in the hothouse world of the Florida orchid trade have been heightened for dramatic effect--consider this: After finishing "The Orchid Thief," I stopped at a small orchid shop in a city more than 1,000 miles from the scene of the crimes and quirks recounted by Orlean.
MAGAZINE
June 4, 2006
I'm a fan of the intriguing scripts of Charlie Kaufman, but I have to object to his full-blown egomania regarding Susan Orlean's "The Orchid Thief" ("Why Charlie Kaufman Is Us," by David Ulin, May 14). Poor Ms. Orlean, who seemed to have been pressured by the producers of the film to put up with the total transmogrification of her book in order to placate Kaufman and director Spike Jonze following the success of "Being John Malkovich." Putting aside the quality of the film "Adaptation," the idea of Kaufman shredding a fellow writer's work because he was unable to adapt it without turning it into a story about himself reeks of shameless self-absorption.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2010
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