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Susan Powter

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1993 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Mirage Hotel here is merely one of several casinos around town where thousands of people come hoping to make a fast buck. This week, more than a thousand others have descended on it in hopes of making a fast pitch.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
January 19, 1998 | ROCHELLE O'GORMAN FLYNN
Fitness guru Powter is one angry lady. As she also has an extremely high energy level, she is able to maintain that anger throughout the entirety of this audio. And, yes, she is a bit much. She is not, however, boring. Powter writes in a conversational and confrontational manner. While you miss out on a few tidbits, such as recipes and resources found in the printed version, you hear this exactly as she wrote it.
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BUSINESS
January 16, 1995 | JAMES BATES
Exercise guru Susan Powter may want to "stop the insanity," but there seems to be no stopping the growing curiosity in her financial matters. Since Powter filed for Chapter 11 protection earlier this month, the infomercial star, author and talk show host's bankruptcy papers have fast become one of the most sought-after files at the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Los Angeles, officials there say.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1995 | JAMES BATES
Exercise guru Susan Powter may want to "stop the insanity," but there seems to be no stopping the growing curiosity in her financial matters. Since Powter filed for Chapter 11 protection earlier this month, the infomercial star, author and talk show host's bankruptcy papers have fast become one of the most sought-after files at the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Los Angeles, officials there say.
HEALTH
January 19, 1998 | ROCHELLE O'GORMAN FLYNN
Fitness guru Powter is one angry lady. As she also has an extremely high energy level, she is able to maintain that anger throughout the entirety of this audio. And, yes, she is a bit much. She is not, however, boring. Powter writes in a conversational and confrontational manner. While you miss out on a few tidbits, such as recipes and resources found in the printed version, you hear this exactly as she wrote it.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1994 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What do a sitcom star, a former sitcom star, a 6-foot-7 Australian, a screaming diet guru and three local radio personalities have in common? * They all want to be this year's Ricki Lake. Seven new daytime talk shows, most doing little more than tweaking the same old formula pioneered by Phil Donahue and perfected by Oprah Winfrey, will join the already overpopulated landscape of television talk. Five of them arrive Monday, two the following week.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fitness Guru Susan Powter Files Chapter 11: The bankruptcy filing by Powter, known for her infomercials and the phrase "Stop the Insanity," comes three months after she sued her former business partners, claiming they forced her to sign a contract that gave them 50% of her business. Details of Powter's bankruptcy filing were not immediately available. Her Dallas company, the privately held Susan Powter Corp., is estimated to have annual sales of more than $50 million.
MAGAZINE
June 12, 1994 | Patt Morrison
There are such nice, redemptive, even cathartic feelings attached to swapping bad things for good ones, like trading Uzis for Janet Jackson concert tickets. Give up that century-old Mauser carbine and get seats at a Mighty Ducks game. Hand over the .38 Smith & Wesson and walk--well, drive--away with $75 worth of transmission work. Exchange a .22 for a carwash and wax.
NEWS
September 7, 1999
Question from Aug. 31: Hasbro is looking for 35 individuals who embody the spirit of G.I. Joe. Whom do you nominate? Linda Tripp. She already looks like a drill sergeant. --PAUL ECKER, Diamond Bar Charlton Heston, who embodies the spirit of G.I. Joe because he already has all the guns and ammunition. --BARBARA FARBER, San Bernardino Madonna. She swears like a sailor. --GRACE E. HAMPTON, Burbank I nominate Susan Powter--she has the hair. And I will bet she has the kung fu grip as well.
BOOKS
November 21, 1993 | Leah Rozen
That's how it used to work. No more. Nowadays, you become famous first. You land a radio or television show or play a juicy role in a headline-grabbing scandal and then, and only then, do publishers come calling. Just check out the current Non-fiction Bestsellers list: Howard Stern, Jerry Seinfeld, Rush Limbaugh and Kathie Lee Gifford. The latest author to join this self-promoting crew is Susan Powter, infomercial diva and fitness queen, with her book, "Stop the Insanity!"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1994 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What do a sitcom star, a former sitcom star, a 6-foot-7 Australian, a screaming diet guru and three local radio personalities have in common? * They all want to be this year's Ricki Lake. Seven new daytime talk shows, most doing little more than tweaking the same old formula pioneered by Phil Donahue and perfected by Oprah Winfrey, will join the already overpopulated landscape of television talk. Five of them arrive Monday, two the following week.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1993 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Mirage Hotel here is merely one of several casinos around town where thousands of people come hoping to make a fast buck. This week, more than a thousand others have descended on it in hopes of making a fast pitch.
NEWS
September 14, 1994 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the applause from the studio audience finally dies down, Susan Powter gets some congratulations from the man upstairs. It's not God, exactly, but Executive Producer Woody Fraser, whose voice comes through Powter's tiny earphone. "Thank you, Woody, thank you very much," she says into her body mike, although it looks as if she's speaking to no one. Beaming, she turns to her staff and squeals, "My daddy said I did a good job! "God," she adds at a normal octave, "I've just gone back 25 years."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1993
I recently attended a reception for pop-portrait artist Rick Ambrose's "Fame Before Cable" exhibit at Melrose Place restaurant and found myself in a lively discussion with the artist, who expressed sentiments similar to those of your Halloween cover story ("The Hobgoblins of Pop Culture," Oct. 31). While wholeheartedly agreeing with your writer Chris Willman that the value of fame has been seriously eroded, Ambrose believes the evidence your writer cited--instant celebrities Susan Powter and Heidi Fleiss--to be merely the symptoms, the real cause of the death of fame being the birth of cable television.
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