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Susan Rankaitis

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May 28, 2000 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
In an art world organized by categories and "isms," Susan Rankaitis would appear to be a hopeless misfit. Propelled by an inquiring mind, a wandering spirit and a profound disrespect for traditional boundaries, she reads voraciously, grapples with scientific theories and produces artistic hybrids that merge photography, painting and sculpture.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2000 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
In an art world organized by categories and "isms," Susan Rankaitis would appear to be a hopeless misfit. Propelled by an inquiring mind, a wandering spirit and a profound disrespect for traditional boundaries, she reads voraciously, grapples with scientific theories and produces artistic hybrids that merge photography, painting and sculpture.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1989 | SUVAN GEER
Once again Susan Rankaitis presents enormous photo-based images that combine bits and pieces of technology and human experience in a dark and light jumble of Cubist space. They mimic the fragmentation of the contemporary mind. Her newest works are increasingly lush, with metallic color adding a sensuous industrial patina. Color washes over fractured space in copper and electric blue fields in "Black Reach," adding a gleaming mystical illumination to an outstretched arm.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1989 | SUVAN GEER
Once again Susan Rankaitis presents enormous photo-based images that combine bits and pieces of technology and human experience in a dark and light jumble of Cubist space. They mimic the fragmentation of the contemporary mind. Her newest works are increasingly lush, with metallic color adding a sensuous industrial patina. Color washes over fractured space in copper and electric blue fields in "Black Reach," adding a gleaming mystical illumination to an outstretched arm.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1987 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
Degrees aren't granted in creativity, Mark Johnstone's subject of choice, so he opted for photography. It wasn't a whimsical decision. Johnstone was already an experienced photographer and teacher in 1977 when he packed all his belongings in a U-Haul trailer and left Colorado for California. Nor was photography a constricting choice.
NEWS
May 2, 1985
They call it the Rites of Spring, and for the second year in a row, students and faculty members at Chapman College in Orange came together Tuesday to, as art department chairman Susan Rankaitis put it, "celebrate the arts at Chapman and celebrate spring in general." The theme of this year's Rites of Spring festival, "Arts and Politics," was carried out in student drawings, paintings, photography, instrumental and choral music, ceramics, drama and poetry readings.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2000 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Until the 1980s, the question of how to reconcile the imaginative realm of painting and the reality-based world of photography was a strong undercurrent in art. For 140 years, the subject was fraught. Susan Rankaitis is among those artists for whom the question has had a special resonance. I think of Rankaitis as a painter.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1988 | CATHY CURTIS, Times Staff Writer
Last November, Sotheby's auctioneer John Marion banged his gavel to record the $53.9-million sale of the most expensive work of art ever bought at auction: Vincent van Gogh's "Irises." On Saturday night, when Marion presides over Art Auction '88 at Newport Harbor Art Museum, the numbers are expected to creep no higher than five figures.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1985 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
A panel discussion on "Two Views of Contemporary Indian Art: The Collector and The Artist" (today at 3 p.m. in Dickson Auditorium at UCLA) introduces an exhibition of Neo-Tantra art at UCLA's Frederick S. Wight Gallery. Panel participants include Chester Herwitz, an art collector and lender to the exhibition; painter and UCLA art professor Lee Mullican and gallery director Edith Tonelli. The exhibition, "Neo-Tantra: Contemporary Indian Painting Inspired by Tradition" (Tuesday through Feb.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1987 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
Degrees aren't granted in creativity, Mark Johnstone's subject of choice, so he opted for photography. It wasn't a whimsical decision. Johnstone was already an experienced photographer and teacher in 1977 when he packed all his belongings in a U-Haul trailer and left Colorado for California. Nor was photography a constricting choice.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2001 | HOLLY MYERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
All art has an economic subtext, but it usually only reveals itself to the public in the form of a price tag. The money that goes into a work before it enters the market is a far less visible detail of the system, although it may involve a considerable investment by the artist, usually made in blind faith and often without the expectation of a return. In showcasing the 10 recipients of its 2000-01 Cultural Grants to Individual Artists (a.k.a.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1990 | KRISTINE McKENNA
"All things of the Earth go back to the earth," observes Michael C. McMillen, whose current exhibition at the L.A. Louver Gallery, "Engine of Mercy," takes a metaphysical look at the themes of time, transformation, decay and mortality. An ambitious show that includes 30 sculptures and a massive installation, this haunting show is about time, yet it seems to exist outside of time, residing instead in a dreamer's world where the pace is languid and slow.
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