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Susan Salter Reynolds

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BOOKS
September 19, 1999
There once were two brothers from Limerick, who came up with an excellent gimmick. We'll tell our life's tale, And the whole world will wail for these brilliant poor blokes from Limerick. First up was young Frank and his mum, whose life was incredibly glum. His da in the drink when not in the clink, on the table not even a crumb. For Malachy life was a lark, a hair-raising binge in the park, No Irish apply except Malachy, who made most of his bets in the dark.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2009
I appreciate the profile Susan Salter Reynolds wrote of me ("A Stillness Within Stephen Mitchell," April 12) and the kindness, sincerity and interest she brought to it. But there are a few points that I would like to clarify. Reynolds wrote that I found solace in the Book of Job. What I found was not solace but its opposite: a ferociously demanding question about human suffering. She also wrote that I felt I had a right to the material I work with. I don't feel that I have a right to anything.
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NEWS
May 11, 2003
Thank you, Susan Salter Reynolds, for the thought-provoking article "Hunting Whales in West L.A." (April 27). I'm a supporter of environmental causes, including the efforts of the Natural Resources Defense Council, and this sensitive article broadened my perspective and made me acutely aware of the trap of "cultural imperialism." Erika Kingett La Jolla
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2008
RE "Mom's in the Clear This Time," by Susan Salter Reynolds, June 4: It may be true that mothers alone are not totally responsible for our consumer culture, our pushing kids to do more than they can and our obsession with the Ivy Leagues, but it is equally true that parents are the best protectors of their children and ultimately must take responsibility for their well-being. These books might help, but unless parents spend more time with their children, have more meals with them and more time hanging out, all the books in the world will not make them good parents.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1998
What a lark! James Joyce's novel "Ulysses" was scarcely "later" than Virginia Woolf's "Mrs. Dalloway," as it was published in 1922, a full three years before "Mrs. Dalloway" appeared ("A Woolf at Her Door," by Susan Salter Reynolds, Feb. 16). What's more, Woolf was well-acquainted with, if admittedly nonplused by, Joyce's masterpiece, so the implication that she was the originator of the single-day-in-June setting is misleading indeed. FELICITY FITZPATRICK Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2008
RE "Mom's in the Clear This Time," by Susan Salter Reynolds, June 4: It may be true that mothers alone are not totally responsible for our consumer culture, our pushing kids to do more than they can and our obsession with the Ivy Leagues, but it is equally true that parents are the best protectors of their children and ultimately must take responsibility for their well-being. These books might help, but unless parents spend more time with their children, have more meals with them and more time hanging out, all the books in the world will not make them good parents.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2009
I appreciate the profile Susan Salter Reynolds wrote of me ("A Stillness Within Stephen Mitchell," April 12) and the kindness, sincerity and interest she brought to it. But there are a few points that I would like to clarify. Reynolds wrote that I found solace in the Book of Job. What I found was not solace but its opposite: a ferociously demanding question about human suffering. She also wrote that I felt I had a right to the material I work with. I don't feel that I have a right to anything.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2003
It is precisely because of Julie Shigekuni being told at her University of New Mexico teaching position interview that "Amy Tan has already written the American experience" that young writers ought to show more respect for others who paved the way for them ("That Was 'Joy Luck,' This Is Now," by Susan Salter Reynolds, June 29). Race continues to matter in this world. Whether Tan's books were smarmy or another narrative of the "model minority," they were also a reflection of the cultural times and social constraints in which she wrote.
NEWS
April 27, 2003
Susan Salter Reynolds did a balanced, thorough and commendable job of describing the complicated literary debt that Wallace Stegner owes to Mary Hallock Foote, and I am extremely grateful to Reynolds and The Times for bringing this important story to light ("Tangle of Repose," March 23). But it is ironic that Reynolds did not acknowledge where she acquired much of the material that composed her article: the premise and arguments put forth in my play "Fair Use." In addition to a copy of the play, I handed Reynolds years of research that went into the writing of it: the Stegner letters, Foote letters and documents attached to the issue; salient quotes pulled from books and interviews about and with Stegner; work I had done tying Stegner's work to Foote's work; even introductions to the Foote family members whom she interviewed.
BOOKS
March 31, 1996
Do the "In Brief" reviews in the book review section mean that the reviewer only briefly looks over the books reviewed rather than actually reads them? It seems so from Susan Salter Reynolds' review of "You'll Never Make Love in This Town Again" (March 17). Her review was so filled with inaccuracies that it seemed to me (I edited and wrote some sections of the book) that Reynolds read only parts of the book--certainly not all of it. First, she said the book was the stories of "four prostitutes."
NEWS
June 28, 2005 | Susan Salter Reynolds
May 29, 2004. About 50 tornadoes set down from North Dakota to Oklahoma. In Missouri, three people are killed and about 18 injured. One man dies shielding his children as his mobile home is blown across the road. Farther north, two women are killed when their home is swept away. It's a beautiful day in the heartland of America.
NEWS
December 30, 2003 | Susan Salter Reynolds
Silence isn't golden. It's pure white, powdery and endless. The quiet is broken only by the sound of "snow bombs" falling from Douglas firs and Jeffrey pines or the scratchy cries of Stellar's jays. No grinding gears of chairlifts, no whining snowmobiles, no lift rides with skiers jabbering on cellphones. Just nature, same as it ever was. You're kicking and gliding, you're in the zone. At 21 degrees, you're downright hot. Peel off another layer. Stop. Look up at the clear sky, smell the sweet air. Feel as if you are the first person to discover this spot, this view, this exhilarating aloneness.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2003
It is precisely because of Julie Shigekuni being told at her University of New Mexico teaching position interview that "Amy Tan has already written the American experience" that young writers ought to show more respect for others who paved the way for them ("That Was 'Joy Luck,' This Is Now," by Susan Salter Reynolds, June 29). Race continues to matter in this world. Whether Tan's books were smarmy or another narrative of the "model minority," they were also a reflection of the cultural times and social constraints in which she wrote.
NEWS
May 11, 2003
Thank you, Susan Salter Reynolds, for the thought-provoking article "Hunting Whales in West L.A." (April 27). I'm a supporter of environmental causes, including the efforts of the Natural Resources Defense Council, and this sensitive article broadened my perspective and made me acutely aware of the trap of "cultural imperialism." Erika Kingett La Jolla
NEWS
April 27, 2003
Susan Salter Reynolds did a balanced, thorough and commendable job of describing the complicated literary debt that Wallace Stegner owes to Mary Hallock Foote, and I am extremely grateful to Reynolds and The Times for bringing this important story to light ("Tangle of Repose," March 23). But it is ironic that Reynolds did not acknowledge where she acquired much of the material that composed her article: the premise and arguments put forth in my play "Fair Use." In addition to a copy of the play, I handed Reynolds years of research that went into the writing of it: the Stegner letters, Foote letters and documents attached to the issue; salient quotes pulled from books and interviews about and with Stegner; work I had done tying Stegner's work to Foote's work; even introductions to the Foote family members whom she interviewed.
BOOKS
September 19, 1999
There once were two brothers from Limerick, who came up with an excellent gimmick. We'll tell our life's tale, And the whole world will wail for these brilliant poor blokes from Limerick. First up was young Frank and his mum, whose life was incredibly glum. His da in the drink when not in the clink, on the table not even a crumb. For Malachy life was a lark, a hair-raising binge in the park, No Irish apply except Malachy, who made most of his bets in the dark.
MAGAZINE
February 8, 1998 | Susan Salter Reynolds last wrote for the magazine on Danish novelist Peter Hoeg
I'm not going to tell you about about the ice wagon," says Harriet Doerr ever so firmly. It was in all the papers 50 years ago. Then again," she says, wavering, "they were Hearst papers." The author of "Stones for Ibarra," a classic of this century, is the mother of spare prose, a patron saint of life's enduring details.
NEWS
June 28, 2005 | Susan Salter Reynolds
May 29, 2004. About 50 tornadoes set down from North Dakota to Oklahoma. In Missouri, three people are killed and about 18 injured. One man dies shielding his children as his mobile home is blown across the road. Farther north, two women are killed when their home is swept away. It's a beautiful day in the heartland of America.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1998
What a lark! James Joyce's novel "Ulysses" was scarcely "later" than Virginia Woolf's "Mrs. Dalloway," as it was published in 1922, a full three years before "Mrs. Dalloway" appeared ("A Woolf at Her Door," by Susan Salter Reynolds, Feb. 16). What's more, Woolf was well-acquainted with, if admittedly nonplused by, Joyce's masterpiece, so the implication that she was the originator of the single-day-in-June setting is misleading indeed. FELICITY FITZPATRICK Los Angeles
MAGAZINE
February 8, 1998 | Susan Salter Reynolds last wrote for the magazine on Danish novelist Peter Hoeg
I'm not going to tell you about about the ice wagon," says Harriet Doerr ever so firmly. It was in all the papers 50 years ago. Then again," she says, wavering, "they were Hearst papers." The author of "Stones for Ibarra," a classic of this century, is the mother of spare prose, a patron saint of life's enduring details.
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