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December 11, 1992 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Susan Seaforth Hayes has been playing the role of Julie Williams off and on for 24 years on the popular NBC soap opera "Days of Our Lives." But she said Thursday she's being given a new role--as "the goodby girl." Hayes, 49, will leave the soap next month in what the producers are calling "a story line-dictated decision." Hayes said she was surprised and saddened by the move. "It's not my decision," Hayes said during a break in filming. "I'm not leaving because I want to.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1992 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Susan Seaforth Hayes has been playing the role of Julie Williams off and on for 24 years on the popular NBC soap opera "Days of Our Lives." But she said Thursday she's being given a new role--as "the goodby girl." Hayes, 49, will leave the soap next month in what the producers are calling "a story line-dictated decision." Hayes said she was surprised and saddened by the move. "It's not my decision," Hayes said during a break in filming. "I'm not leaving because I want to.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1989 | Sue Facter \f7
Susan Seaforth Hayes, who portrayed the popular character Julie Olson Williams on NBC's "Days of Our Lives" for 16 years before leaving in 1984, will resume playing the role in January. Seaforth Hayes joined "Days" in 1968 and met her husband, actor Bill Hayes, on the show. One of soapdom's reigning couples, they were the first soap actors to grace the cover of a non-entertainment national magazine, Time, in 1976.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1989 | Sue Facter \f7
Susan Seaforth Hayes, who portrayed the popular character Julie Olson Williams on NBC's "Days of Our Lives" for 16 years before leaving in 1984, will resume playing the role in January. Seaforth Hayes joined "Days" in 1968 and met her husband, actor Bill Hayes, on the show. One of soapdom's reigning couples, they were the first soap actors to grace the cover of a non-entertainment national magazine, Time, in 1976.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1989 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Hayes to Return to 'Days': Actress Susan Seaforth Hayes will recreate her longtime role of Julie Williams when she rejoins the cast of NBC's popular daytime drama "Days of Our Lives," beginning in mid-February. Hayes earned four Emmy nominations while playing the role from 1968-1984.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1986 | Sue Facter
King of the Soaps Bill Hayes is returning to his throne on "Days of Our Lives"--in the role of Doug Williams that he created in 1970 and abandoned two years ago. (Air date for the royal return: about April 1.) Hayes and wife, Susan Seaforth Hayes, who played his soap wife, Julie Williams, were known as the King and Queen of Soaps. They shocked their fans when they jointly quit (she now toils on "The Young and the Restless").
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1990 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Old habits die hard. Last spring, the Glendale Music Theatre was told that it could no longer perform at Glendale Community College, its longtime home. The college's auditorium was being converted into a considerably smaller stage and badly needed classrooms. But construction was delayed, so the 42-year-old GMT is now staging a fall production of the Broadway musical "42nd Street." And theater officials aren't quite ready to give up on their familiar surroundings.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1989 | NANCY M. REICHARDT
"Days of Our Lives" took a big gamble in 1988. In an effort to boost the show's mediocre ratings, the powers-that-be came up with a plan to incorporate action/adventure into the show's usual romantic story lines. "We were trying to do a better show," says Al Rabin, who recently returned to the helm as the supervising executive producer. "We tried to keep the romantic aspects of the show and add an element of adventure. But the reality is you can only do so much." Apparently so.
NEWS
November 12, 1991 | BILL HIGGINS
The Scene: The party at the Regent Beverly Wilshire Friday night celebrating the 26th anniversary of NBC's daytime drama "Days of Our Lives." This is TV's top-rated soap. It should be running into the next century. Or, as executive producer Ken Corday put it, "There's no light at the end of the tunnel." Who Was There: Among the 400 guests were studio execs, crew, writers and "Days" stars, including Frances Reid, Peter Reckell, Staci Greason, Drake Hogestyn and Matthew Ashford.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | LIBBY SLATE
The Scene: Twentieth anniversary celebration for the CBS soap opera "The Young and the Restless" Tuesday night at the Four Seasons. Created by William J. Bell and his wife, Lee Phillip Bell, the show premiered March 23, 1973. It has been the No. 1-rated daytime drama for the past 220 weeks, and has won four Emmy Awards for Outstanding Daytime Drama.
NEWS
October 23, 1994 | LIBBY SLATE
At the dress rehearsal for the CBS special "50 Years of Soaps: An All-Star Celebration," two-time Daytime Emmy winner Peter Bergman was hopping from empty table to empty table, looking at the seating assignments marked with photos of the soap stars. "He went around saying, 'Oh, so-and-so's going to be here! I haven't seen her for years,' " recounts John C. Moffitt, the show's executive producer-director. The excited Bergman ("The Young and the Restless") was "like a kid," Moffitt recalls.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1994 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Spoleto's New Era: The Spoleto Festival U.S.A. opens a scaled-down 18th season today--without Gian Carlo Menotti, the Pulitzer Prize-winning composer who established the prestigious Charleston, S.C., festival in 1977 as a companion to a similar Italian festival. Menotti, 82, left last fall in a dispute over festival finances and who would head the annual event after he retired. This year's festival--with a reduced budget of $4.2 million--will run only 12 days instead of the traditional 17.
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