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Susan Sontag

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December 31, 2004 | From Associated Press
Sarajevo authorities will name a street after writer Susan Sontag, who helped the city's residents during the 1992-95 Bosnian war. Sontag, 71, died Tuesday in New York from complications of leukemia. "The city of Sarajevo [and] its citizens express their sincere thanks to an author and a humanist who actively participated in the creation of the history of Sarajevo and Bosnia," said a statement Thursday from the office of Mayor Muhidin Hamamdzic. Sontag made numerous visits during the war and lobbied for the end of the siege of the Bosnian capital.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
¡Feliz cumpleaños, Susan Sontag! The great critic, novelist and iconoclast was born Jan. 16, 1933. Today would've been her 81st birthday. Many readers associate Sontag with New York: She was born in the Big Apple and first made her name there as a critic in her late 20s. But we Angelenos know that Sontag, the author of 17 books that have been translated into 32 languages, is also one of our own. Long before she wrote her hugely influential "On...
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2005
Thank you for the splendid, personal account by Tim Rutten of his friendship with Susan Sontag ["The Life of a Restless Mind," Dec. 29]. I too feel the loss of this lively, intellectual woman -- almost as though we had been personal friends. Sontag has influenced my reading over the years, led me to writers I might never have encountered (Sandor Marai, Karoly Pap, many more) and thus been denied the brilliance and humanity of their work. How sorely this distorted world needs people who offer their humane vision, bravely.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Geoff Dyer
I wonder if the curators of the excellent "War/Photography" show at the Annenberg Space for Photography were tempted to include Jeff Wall's "Dead Troops Talk (A Vision After an Ambush of a Red Army Patrol, Near Moqor, Afghanistan, Winter, 1986)". It certainly made a strong impression on Susan Sontag, whose book "Regarding the Pain of Others" ends with a long discussion of a work she considers "exemplary in its thoughtfulness and power. " An image of a "made-up event," this huge photograph was constructed in Wall's studio.
BOOKS
January 2, 2005 | Richard Howard, Richard Howard is the author, most recently, of "Inner Voices: Selected Poems, 1963-2003" and "Paper Trail: Selected Prose, 1965-2003."
When Susan Sontag died last week, at age 71, after her third bout with cancer, this country lost the most versatile and passionate intellectual of her generation, a patiently experimental artist and a social conscience of unflinching principle.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2009 | Laurie Stone, Stone is the author of "Starting With Serge," "Close to the Bone" and "Laughing in the Dark."
Reborn Journals & Notebooks 1947-1963 Susan Sontag, edited by David Rieff Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 318 pp., $25 -- In September 2006, an excerpt of Susan Sontag's diaries, edited by her son, David Rieff, was published in the New York Times magazine, and that night I went to a dinner party where a woman poet in her 50s exhaled a sigh of disgust. Sontag is shown in her 20s, cutting a swath through literary hedges in Paris and New York and reeling from heartbreaking affairs with women.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2011 | By Regina Marler, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Sempre Susan A Memoir of Susan Sontag Sigrid Nunez Atlas & Co.: 140 pp., $20 When novelist Sigrid Nunez accepted a part-time job helping Susan Sontag cope with correspondence that had built up during her first bout with cancer, she thought that she'd found exactly the job she needed: one that would not interfere with her own writing. She didn't realize she would also find a mentor, a friend and an antagonist in Sontag, and that 30 years later she would still be organizing her bookshelves and watching movies in the way that Susan — for she was always "Susan," as the title suggests — thought best.
NEWS
May 10, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Over the pleas of peace activists in Israel, American writer Susan Sontag accepted the country's top literary award--but used her speech to criticize the Jewish state's treatment of Palestinians. Some activists had pressured Sontag, 68, not to accept the Jerusalem Prize, saying it would be seen as indirect support for hawkish Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2000 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Susan Sontag's just-released novel "In America" is the story of Maryna Zalewsky, a famous Polish actress who, in the late 19th century, moves to Anaheim with her husband, son and a group of friends to establish a Utopian farming community. When the farm fails financially, Maryna returns to the stage to become one of the world's most successful actresses. This Sunday, Sontag will talk about her work at the downtown Central Library.
OPINION
January 4, 2005 | Patrick Moore, Patrick Moore is the author of "Beyond Shame: Reclaiming the Abandoned History of Radical Gay Sexuality" (Beacon Press, 2004).
On Dec. 29, 2004, major gay and lesbian news organizations announced that "lesbian writer Susan Sontag" had died. In its obituary of Sontag, the New York Daily News wrote, "Famed photographer Annie Leibovitz had been her longtime companion." On Dec. 29, 2004, the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times reported Sontag's death on their front pages, with more stories inside. Yet neither paper mentioned Sontag's relationships with Leibovitz and other women.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2011 | By Regina Marler, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Sempre Susan A Memoir of Susan Sontag Sigrid Nunez Atlas & Co.: 140 pp., $20 When novelist Sigrid Nunez accepted a part-time job helping Susan Sontag cope with correspondence that had built up during her first bout with cancer, she thought that she'd found exactly the job she needed: one that would not interfere with her own writing. She didn't realize she would also find a mentor, a friend and an antagonist in Sontag, and that 30 years later she would still be organizing her bookshelves and watching movies in the way that Susan — for she was always "Susan," as the title suggests — thought best.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2011 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If there is one aspect of Susan Sontag's multifaceted life that has resisted enshrinement, it is her film career. Sontag was not primarily a film critic ? having avowed more than once that she valued her fiction over her essays, she might even have contested the notion that she was primarily a critic. But she was a central figure in film culture. The essays she published on movies ? her first collection, "Against Interpretation," included pieces on science fiction and Jean-Luc Godard ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2009 | Larry Gordon
Pomona College has received a $7.5-million donation to help build a new residence hall with high levels of energy efficiency and the use of solar power, officials announced. The gift comes from Rick and Susan Sontag. Susan Sontag is a Pomona alumna, and the couple have a daughter who graduated from Pomona. Rick's late uncle taught in Pomona's philosophy department over 50 years. -- Larry Gordon
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2009 | Laurie Stone, Stone is the author of "Starting With Serge," "Close to the Bone" and "Laughing in the Dark."
Reborn Journals & Notebooks 1947-1963 Susan Sontag, edited by David Rieff Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 318 pp., $25 -- In September 2006, an excerpt of Susan Sontag's diaries, edited by her son, David Rieff, was published in the New York Times magazine, and that night I went to a dinner party where a woman poet in her 50s exhaled a sigh of disgust. Sontag is shown in her 20s, cutting a swath through literary hedges in Paris and New York and reeling from heartbreaking affairs with women.
BOOKS
January 6, 2008 | Thomas Lynch, Thomas Lynch is a poet, essayist and funeral director. His books include "The Undertaking: Life Studies From the Dismal Trade" and "Still Life in Milford."
LIKE Susan Sontag, my mother died of cancer. Soon after that, my father died. So, just as Sontag's son, David Rieff, had been orphaned in his early 50s, I was orphaned in my early 40s. We both took up our family trades and inherited, likewise, a version, however modified, of our mothers' core beliefs. Mine was a "Bells of St. Mary's" Irish Catholicism.
OPINION
January 9, 2005
Re "Susan Sontag and a Case of Curious Silence," Commentary, Jan. 4: When I think of Sontag, I think of liberated hearts and minds that transcend the "conditioned" to see more clearly into the nature of the issue at hand. To better understand ourselves by seizing life with an openness that is discerning and passionate is what Susan Sontag taught us. This is what we respond to. Reducing her character to a particular niche, be it sexual, political or otherwise, is self-serving, shortsighted and not deserving of our attention.
BOOKS
August 26, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
In this extraordinarily cogent essay, Susan Sontag considers how the art of photography is perceived in Western society and how it has affected perception.
BOOKS
February 4, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Written while the author was undergoing treatment for cancer in 1978, "Illness as Metaphor" examines an abuse of language. Susan Sontag demonstrates how the imagery associated with tuberculosis, syphilis and, especially, cancer reveals societal attitudes toward the maladies and people who contract them. An unclear understanding of the diseases and their effects produces inappropriate language, which further impairs perception.
OPINION
January 9, 2005
The death of Susan Sontag on Dec. 29 unleashed the greatest volume of intellectual and pseudo-intellectual eulogizing since ... well, since the death of Jacques Derrida on Oct. 8. So which celebrity thinker fared best in 2004's excessively polysyllabic Obituary Bowl? Compiled by Michael Soller * Born * Sontag: New York, Jan.
OPINION
January 6, 2005
Underlying Patrick Moore's Jan. 4 commentary, "Susan Sontag and a Case of Curious Silence," runs the observation that most, if not all, gays and lesbians inherently know that their penchant for those of the same gender is an aberration, physiologically contrary and conflicted, and therefore a situation to keep in the dark, as Sontag apparently did and understood. It is likewise understandable that even the liberal news media may have subliminally avoided making Sontag's lifestyle an issue or paramount to what she had accomplished in life.
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