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Susan Stamberg

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1986
I haven't laughed out loud after reading a newspaper editorial for a long time. Your editorial tribute (Sept. 19) to Susan Stamberg was a real treat. She deserves every nice, thoughtful word written about her services to National Public Radio and "All Things Considered." MARTHA SCUDDER Rancho Cucamonga
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2001 | DONNA PERLMUTTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The voice--earthy, warm and New Yorkish--is unmistakable. As anyone familiar with National Public Radio over the last few decades would know, it belongs to Susan Stamberg, virtually synonymous with the broadcasting system that now reaches roughly 20 million listeners. Stamberg is not falsely modest. On the phone from Washington, D.C.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2001 | DONNA PERLMUTTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The voice--earthy, warm and New Yorkish--is unmistakable. As anyone familiar with National Public Radio over the last few decades would know, it belongs to Susan Stamberg, virtually synonymous with the broadcasting system that now reaches roughly 20 million listeners. Stamberg is not falsely modest. On the phone from Washington, D.C.
FOOD
December 5, 1996
Perhaps your readers would like to know that the recipe for Olga's Cranberry Sauce ("A Few Good Sides," Nov. 21) was a creation of the late Mike Roy and was broadcast over his radio show approximately 20 years ago. Mike's recipe did not require freezing--only refrigeration--but did require whipping before serving. (I usually add a pinch of salt to the other ingredients.) This is an excellent sauce, which goes well with roast beef and lamb as well as turkey. SUE ROTH Los Angeles I'm about 99% sure the origin of Olga's Cranberry Sauce is Susan Stamberg, longtime host of National Public Radio's "All Things Considered."
BOOKS
May 23, 1993 | CHRIS GOODRICH
TALK: NPR's Susan Stamberg Considers All Things by Susan Stamberg (Turtle Bay Books: $24; 374 pp.) Radio is something we typically listen to while doing something else--driving, sunning, cooking dinner. And that means we don't tend to take it very seriously, that we underestimate the kind of work and intelligence that goes into a superior radio broadcast.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1986
Susan Stamberg, a 15-year veteran of National Public Radio's daily news magazine, "All Things Considered," said farewell to her co-host role Monday to begin preparation for hosting NPR's new Sunday morning "Weekend Edition," scheduled to premiere next winter. "I'm not saying goodby to listeners," she said on the air Monday night, "just getting ready to greet them on a whole new day."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1986
Like millions of others who have made National Public Radio's news magazine "All Things Considered" a nightly habit, we're going to miss the program's co-host--or, as they insist on saying in that line of journalism, co-anchor--Susan Stamberg. We've grown accustomed to her voice. We've also grown accustomed to her style, which includes an occasional outburst of hearty laughter when something said in an interview strikes her as worth laughing about.
FOOD
December 5, 1996
Perhaps your readers would like to know that the recipe for Olga's Cranberry Sauce ("A Few Good Sides," Nov. 21) was a creation of the late Mike Roy and was broadcast over his radio show approximately 20 years ago. Mike's recipe did not require freezing--only refrigeration--but did require whipping before serving. (I usually add a pinch of salt to the other ingredients.) This is an excellent sauce, which goes well with roast beef and lamb as well as turkey. SUE ROTH Los Angeles I'm about 99% sure the origin of Olga's Cranberry Sauce is Susan Stamberg, longtime host of National Public Radio's "All Things Considered."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1993 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As secretary of state during the 1980s, George P. Shultz had to contend with the Cold War, terrorism and a host of other pressing foreign policy issues. Although his new book provides a detailed examination of those tumultuous years, Shultz told a book-and-author luncheon Thursday that the Reagan Administration was not without its fun.
BOOKS
May 23, 1993 | CHRIS GOODRICH
TALK: NPR's Susan Stamberg Considers All Things by Susan Stamberg (Turtle Bay Books: $24; 374 pp.) Radio is something we typically listen to while doing something else--driving, sunning, cooking dinner. And that means we don't tend to take it very seriously, that we underestimate the kind of work and intelligence that goes into a superior radio broadcast.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1993 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Susan Stamberg loves to retell the "Nancy" story. Back in 1980, the veteran National Public Radio reporter had to wait for an hour--half of it spent in the freezing snow outside the Reagans' Virginia home--before Nancy Reagan was ready to be interviewed. But when the moment finally arrived, the soon-to-be First Lady hardly rushed to greet Stamberg.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1993 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As secretary of state during the 1980s, George P. Shultz had to contend with the Cold War, terrorism and a host of other pressing foreign policy issues. Although his new book provides a detailed examination of those tumultuous years, Shultz told a book-and-author luncheon Thursday that the Reagan Administration was not without its fun.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1986
I haven't laughed out loud after reading a newspaper editorial for a long time. Your editorial tribute (Sept. 19) to Susan Stamberg was a real treat. She deserves every nice, thoughtful word written about her services to National Public Radio and "All Things Considered." MARTHA SCUDDER Rancho Cucamonga
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1986
Like millions of others who have made National Public Radio's news magazine "All Things Considered" a nightly habit, we're going to miss the program's co-host--or, as they insist on saying in that line of journalism, co-anchor--Susan Stamberg. We've grown accustomed to her voice. We've also grown accustomed to her style, which includes an occasional outburst of hearty laughter when something said in an interview strikes her as worth laughing about.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1993 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Susan Stamberg loves to retell the "Nancy" story. Back in 1980, the veteran National Public Radio reporter had to wait for an hour--half of it spent in the freezing snow outside the Reagans' Virginia home--before Nancy Reagan was ready to be interviewed. But when the moment finally arrived, the soon-to-be First Lady hardly rushed to greet Stamberg.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1989 | From Associated Press
Liane Hansen, current host of National Public Radio's "Performance Today" show, will replace Sunday "Weekend Edition" host Susan Stamberg, who is becoming a special correspondent, NPR said Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1986
Susan Stamberg, a 15-year veteran of National Public Radio's daily news magazine, "All Things Considered," said farewell to her co-host role Monday to begin preparation for hosting NPR's new Sunday morning "Weekend Edition," scheduled to premiere next winter. "I'm not saying goodby to listeners," she said on the air Monday night, "just getting ready to greet them on a whole new day."
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