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Susan Stroman

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2012
Susan Stroman, the Broadway powerhouse who has won five Tony Awards, will direct and choreograph "The Producers" at the Hollywood Bowl in July, the Los Angeles Philharmonic will announce Thursday. The musical is familiar territory for Stroman, who staged the original show on Broadway at the St. James Theatre in 2001 and directed the movie version in 2005. "The Producers" is scheduled to run July 27-29 at the Bowl. No cast has been announced. Based on the 1968 Mel Brooks movie, "The Producers" tells the story of a theatrical impresario and an accountant who try to get rich by securing investments for a guaranteed Broadway flop, "Springtime for Hitler.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
SAN DIEGO - Musicals are supposed to raise your spirits and warm your heart, right? Not necessarily. And certainly not in the case of "The Scottsboro Boys," the fearlessly inventive show about one of the most notorious episodes of racial injustice in America. It disturbs audiences as much as it entertains them. Who else but Kander & Ebb could pull off such a daring combination? Best known for "Cabaret" and "Chicago," John Kander and Fred Ebb were masters of "the concept musical," and "The Scottsboro Boys," created with book writer David Thompson and completed after the death of Ebb in 2004, is arguably the duo's most audacious crack at the form.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2012 | By John Clark, Special to the Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - Director-choreographer Susan Stroman is standing with arms folded, watching a group of dancers run through a number. They have the great athleticism and some serious lung power, all of which is way too big for the rehearsal room. But it won't feel that way once they're onstage. "Make it a small step," Stroman says. "Make it nice and easy. Don't make a big deal out of it. " Facing a mirror, she demonstrates the Charleston. She doesn't make a big deal out of it, even though most 57-year-olds can't move that way. In fact, as she stops the dancers to tweak a position or deliver direction, she doesn't make a big deal out of anything.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2012 | By John Clark, Special to the Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - Director-choreographer Susan Stroman is standing with arms folded, watching a group of dancers run through a number. They have the great athleticism and some serious lung power, all of which is way too big for the rehearsal room. But it won't feel that way once they're onstage. "Make it a small step," Stroman says. "Make it nice and easy. Don't make a big deal out of it. " Facing a mirror, she demonstrates the Charleston. She doesn't make a big deal out of it, even though most 57-year-olds can't move that way. In fact, as she stops the dancers to tweak a position or deliver direction, she doesn't make a big deal out of anything.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1992 | BARBARA ISENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Family night at Susan Stroman's house in Wilmington, Del., was an evening spent huddled around the TV watching old movie musicals. Enamored of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, she was taking dance lessons and imagining dance numbers in her head by the time she was 6. It didn't stop with imagination either for Stroman, who often danced from room to room with canes, shovels and other objects she found around the house.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2007
Broadway bound: A musical version of "Young Frankenstein," with music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, is to arrive on Broadway this fall, Playbill.com reported Thursday. No casting has been announced, but Susan Stroman will direct, as she did with Brooks' "The Producers."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2001 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
At the heart of the three-part 1999 dance musical "Contact" is the power of fantasy in human lives: sex fantasy, of course, but also fantasies of impossible escape and of miraculous personal salvation. In all of these otherwise unconnected stories, the vehicle for these fantasies--the way the central characters define their dreams--is by dancing. Nobody sings (though there are recorded songs galore underscoring the action) and talk belongs to the mundane and often intolerable real world.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
SAN DIEGO - Musicals are supposed to raise your spirits and warm your heart, right? Not necessarily. And certainly not in the case of "The Scottsboro Boys," the fearlessly inventive show about one of the most notorious episodes of racial injustice in America. It disturbs audiences as much as it entertains them. Who else but Kander & Ebb could pull off such a daring combination? Best known for "Cabaret" and "Chicago," John Kander and Fred Ebb were masters of "the concept musical," and "The Scottsboro Boys," created with book writer David Thompson and completed after the death of Ebb in 2004, is arguably the duo's most audacious crack at the form.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2006 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
BROADWAY has always prized director-choreographers who could deliver hit musicals with an individual stamp on them -- masters such as Jerome Robbins, Bob Fosse, Gower Champion, Michael Bennett and Tommy Tune. Even when an individual project failed, they brought a special excitement to the Great White Way: that Broadway rhythm long celebrated on stage and screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2004 | Barbara Isenberg, Special to The Times
When Broadway director and choreographer Susan Stroman got a call some months ago from Peter Martins, head of the New York City Ballet, she wasn't particularly surprised. A few years earlier, she'd created a 12-minute ballet for the company as part of a salute to Duke Ellington. But this time, the salute Martins was calling about was to George Balanchine, the fabled choreographer who co-founded City Ballet in 1948 and is now the subject of a yearlong centennial celebration by the troupe.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2012
Susan Stroman, the Broadway powerhouse who has won five Tony Awards, will direct and choreograph "The Producers" at the Hollywood Bowl in July, the Los Angeles Philharmonic will announce Thursday. The musical is familiar territory for Stroman, who staged the original show on Broadway at the St. James Theatre in 2001 and directed the movie version in 2005. "The Producers" is scheduled to run July 27-29 at the Bowl. No cast has been announced. Based on the 1968 Mel Brooks movie, "The Producers" tells the story of a theatrical impresario and an accountant who try to get rich by securing investments for a guaranteed Broadway flop, "Springtime for Hitler.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2007
Broadway bound: A musical version of "Young Frankenstein," with music and lyrics by Mel Brooks, is to arrive on Broadway this fall, Playbill.com reported Thursday. No casting has been announced, but Susan Stroman will direct, as she did with Brooks' "The Producers."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2006 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
BROADWAY has always prized director-choreographers who could deliver hit musicals with an individual stamp on them -- masters such as Jerome Robbins, Bob Fosse, Gower Champion, Michael Bennett and Tommy Tune. Even when an individual project failed, they brought a special excitement to the Great White Way: that Broadway rhythm long celebrated on stage and screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2004 | Barbara Isenberg, Special to The Times
When Broadway director and choreographer Susan Stroman got a call some months ago from Peter Martins, head of the New York City Ballet, she wasn't particularly surprised. A few years earlier, she'd created a 12-minute ballet for the company as part of a salute to Duke Ellington. But this time, the salute Martins was calling about was to George Balanchine, the fabled choreographer who co-founded City Ballet in 1948 and is now the subject of a yearlong centennial celebration by the troupe.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2001 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
At the heart of the three-part 1999 dance musical "Contact" is the power of fantasy in human lives: sex fantasy, of course, but also fantasies of impossible escape and of miraculous personal salvation. In all of these otherwise unconnected stories, the vehicle for these fantasies--the way the central characters define their dreams--is by dancing. Nobody sings (though there are recorded songs galore underscoring the action) and talk belongs to the mundane and often intolerable real world.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2000 | PATRICK PACHECO, Patrick Pacheco is a regular contributor to Calendar
When director-choreographer Susan Stroman levels her blue eyes at you and says, "Musical theater is such a life force for me," you believe her. You believe her because she has managed to ride that personal credo to the pinnacle of theatrical success. She has won Tony Awards as choreographer for "Crazy for You" and the revival of "Show Boat," and last year she garnered raves from the British critics for her dances in Trevor Nunn's revival of "Oklahoma!" at the Royal National Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2000 | PATRICK PACHECO, Patrick Pacheco is a regular contributor to Calendar
When director-choreographer Susan Stroman levels her blue eyes at you and says, "Musical theater is such a life force for me," you believe her. You believe her because she has managed to ride that personal credo to the pinnacle of theatrical success. She has won Tony Awards as choreographer for "Crazy for You" and the revival of "Show Boat," and last year she garnered raves from the British critics for her dances in Trevor Nunn's revival of "Oklahoma!" at the Royal National Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1993 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nations press
The American musical "Crazy for You" and the American urban drama "Six Degrees of Separation" have won top honors at London's Laurence Olivier awards. In addition to the top musical prize, the Gershwin show "Crazy for You" won best choreography for Susan Stroman, who won a Tony for the same musical in New York in June.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1992 | BARBARA ISENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Family night at Susan Stroman's house in Wilmington, Del., was an evening spent huddled around the TV watching old movie musicals. Enamored of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, she was taking dance lessons and imagining dance numbers in her head by the time she was 6. It didn't stop with imagination either for Stroman, who often danced from room to room with canes, shovels and other objects she found around the house.
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