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Susan Svrcek

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NEWS
April 22, 2004 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
It wasn't so long ago that Heitor Villa-Lobos and Carlos Chavez were known as one-hit composers. Villa-Lobos wrote a very pretty tune for soprano and eight cellos, "Bachianas brasileira No. 5," that captured even the ear of comedian Ernie Kovacs. He made it a showpiece for his wife, Edie Adams, who sang it, surrounded by a halo of cellos, on his innovative 1950s television program.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
When pianist, pedagogue and Arnold Schoenberg's former secretary Leonard Stein formed Piano Spheres in Los Angeles in 1994, he was providing exposure to four of the best and most imaginative students he had mentored. Gloria Cheng, Vicki Ray, Mark Robson and Susan Svrcek are now among theĀ  best, busiest and least dispensable pianists in Los Angeles, to say nothing of the most dedicated. Nine years after Stein's death, Piano Spheres still thrives and on Saturday celebrates the series' upcoming 20th anniversary by providing a rare opportunity to hear all four pianists on the same stage.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1999 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the post-minimalist age, we tend to incorrectly think of the meditative strain in new music as a domain lorded over by minimalist thinking. But other possibilities, more radical conceptions of meditative music, have also been presented by 20th century icons, such as Karlheinz Stockhausen's bracing work "Mantra," the centerpiece of a Southwest Chamber Music concert Saturday night at the Armory Center for the Arts in Pasadena.
NEWS
April 22, 2004 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
It wasn't so long ago that Heitor Villa-Lobos and Carlos Chavez were known as one-hit composers. Villa-Lobos wrote a very pretty tune for soprano and eight cellos, "Bachianas brasileira No. 5," that captured even the ear of comedian Ernie Kovacs. He made it a showpiece for his wife, Edie Adams, who sang it, surrounded by a halo of cellos, on his innovative 1950s television program.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
When pianist, pedagogue and Arnold Schoenberg's former secretary Leonard Stein formed Piano Spheres in Los Angeles in 1994, he was providing exposure to four of the best and most imaginative students he had mentored. Gloria Cheng, Vicki Ray, Mark Robson and Susan Svrcek are now among theĀ  best, busiest and least dispensable pianists in Los Angeles, to say nothing of the most dedicated. Nine years after Stein's death, Piano Spheres still thrives and on Saturday celebrates the series' upcoming 20th anniversary by providing a rare opportunity to hear all four pianists on the same stage.
NEWS
April 17, 2003 | Daniel Cariaga, Times Staff Writer
Now in its ninth season, the exhilarating Piano Spheres series continues to bring its growing audience rare, unusual and important works. In the process, that audience has been able to observe the steady and growing success of its five founders. Susan Svrcek, who has consistently performed at higher and higher levels in her annual appearances on the series, returned Tuesday night to confront one of the peaks of the modern repertory, Charles Ives' "Concord" or Second Sonata.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1996
Pianist-composer Mark Robson opens the 1996-97 season of Piano Spheres at Neighborhood Church in Pasadena on Sept. 17 with a program introducing his own 24 Preludes for the Left Hand Alone and Liszt's operatic paraphrase, "Reminiscences de Norma." Subsequent recitals on the series will be given by Susan Svrcek (Nov. 19), Vicki Ray (Jan. 14), Leonard Stein (March 18) and Gloria Cheng (May 13). Neighborhood Church is at 301 N. Orange Grove Blvd., Pasadena. Concerts are Tuesday nights at 8.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1993 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Fullerton Friends of Music has announced its 35th season of free Sunday afternoon concerts, to be given at Sunny Hills High School, 1801 Warburton Way. * Oct. 24: The Cleveland Duo (Stephen Warner, violin, and Carolyn Gadiel Warner, piano and violin) and guest cellist Bryan Dumm will play works by Mozart, Leclair, Brahms, Bartok and Frank Bridge. * Dec.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1995 | DANIEL CARIAGA
The world of piano is a continuum: The ghosts of Liszt and Chopin, Czerny and Pischna, Rosina Lhevinne and Adele Marcus, among thousands of others, hover over any ambitious recital, anywhere. Those ghosts should have been pleased Tuesday night when Susan Svrcek continued the repertory-expanding Piano Spheres series at Neighborhood Church in Pasadena with two large-scale works written in the past quarter-century.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1995 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Reports of the demise of the piano recital continue to be exaggerated. Indeed, the genre thrives, despite hall closings and other downsizings in the concert world. Closing a first season, the enterprising and repertorially challenging Piano Spheres series, new in 1994-95, presented Susan Svrcek in the sanctuary at Neighborhood Church in Pasadena on Tuesday night. Svrcek chose a program both bold and heroic, and played it in a big-boned manner.
NEWS
April 17, 2003 | Daniel Cariaga, Times Staff Writer
Now in its ninth season, the exhilarating Piano Spheres series continues to bring its growing audience rare, unusual and important works. In the process, that audience has been able to observe the steady and growing success of its five founders. Susan Svrcek, who has consistently performed at higher and higher levels in her annual appearances on the series, returned Tuesday night to confront one of the peaks of the modern repertory, Charles Ives' "Concord" or Second Sonata.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1999 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the post-minimalist age, we tend to incorrectly think of the meditative strain in new music as a domain lorded over by minimalist thinking. But other possibilities, more radical conceptions of meditative music, have also been presented by 20th century icons, such as Karlheinz Stockhausen's bracing work "Mantra," the centerpiece of a Southwest Chamber Music concert Saturday night at the Armory Center for the Arts in Pasadena.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1995 | HERBERT GLASS
Location, location, location! In real estate it's said to be what ultimately determines the value of the property. And in respect to location--at least during the summer--the Southwest Chamber Music Society's concerts certainly have it at the Loggia of the Huntington Library's main gallery: magnificent visually and less predictable, considering its open-air exposure, acoustically.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1998 | JOHN HENKEN
For a composer of putative abstraction, Elliott Carter is uncommonly sensitive to poetic imagery. On Thursday, Southwest Chamber Music matched three of his text-spurred works with two Ravel pieces, also of literary inspiration, in a tight, compelling program at the Museum of Tolerance. "Of Challenge and of Love" sets five poems by John Hollander with Carter's characteristic clarity of texture and complexity of motivic means.
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