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Susan Toepfer

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BUSINESS
November 8, 2003 | From Associated Press
Rosie O'Donnell said Friday that her publisher had deceived her about how Rosie magazine would be run and that she was the victim of a "coup d'etat." O'Donnell, finishing her testimony in a breach-of-contract case in state Supreme Court in Manhattan, said she had entered the joint venture with Gruner & Jahr USA believing she controlled the editorial content and staff of the magazine. By the end of the summer of 2002, she said, she believed that was no longer true.
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BUSINESS
November 6, 2003 | From Associated Press
A cancer survivor burst into tears Wednesday when she testified that Rosie O'Donnell had suggested she was lying about goings-on at her now-defunct magazine and told her that liars get cancer. Cindy Spengler, who was head of marketing at Rosie magazine, said O'Donnell made the remark after a meeting to discuss the magazine's problems. Spengler said O'Donnell called and told her that her silence in the meeting was tantamount to lying.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2003 | From Associated Press
Rosie O'Donnell told the editor of her now-defunct magazine that because she was a lesbian she strongly objected to a cover photo showing the entertainer with her arms around other women, according to testimony Monday. Susan Toepfer, who became editor in chief in July 2002, said the photo was shot for Rosie magazine's September 2002 cover. Both sides agree the cover started a fight that led to the magazine's demise. The cover featured women from the TV show "The Sopranos," Toepfer said.
NEWS
August 25, 2002 | TARA WEISS, HARTFORD COURANT
Celebrity magazines always seem like such a good idea at the time. The formula is simple: Take a celebrity with a well-established message, and parlay that into a magazine bursting with her personality. As in Martha Stewart Living, Rosie and O, the Oprah Magazine. But what happens when that celebrity's image is tarnished or her talk show ends?
NEWS
September 20, 2002 | SUSAN CARPENTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To her readers, it should have been obvious: Rosie O'Donnell--the bighearted former talk-show host and renowned "queen of nice"--was missing from the cover of Rosie, her own magazine. Gone were the days of O'Donnell hugging Fran Drescher, goofing with Donny Osmond and posing in her hospital gown. After seemingly endless covers of O'Donnell mugging with celebs and yukking it up for the camera, she was slowly being replaced. In September it was "The Sopranos." In October it's Celine Dion.
NEWS
December 12, 1996 | PAUL D. COLFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Paul D. Colford is a columnist for Newsday
Guests filled Caroline's comedy club in midtown Manhattan the other night to learn the winners of Esquire's 35th annual Dubious Achievement Awards. Editor in Chief Edward Kosner reminded the uninitiated that the honors recognize "stupidity, stupidity, mendacity and general corruption." Dick Morris was named Man of the Year, and Roberto Alomar, the spitting second-baseman for the Baltimore Orioles, was Crybaby of the Year.
NEWS
September 25, 2001 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States has long been a society fascinated by--obsessed with--celebrity. We are, after all, the land of Lindbergh and Elvis, of Jackie and Marilyn, of Michael and Madonna. In recent decades, amid the burgeoning growth of mass-market magazines, all-news television networks and such TV magazine shows as "60 Minutes" and "20/20," the coverage (and the creation) of celebrities has become a cottage industry for much of the nation's news media.
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