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Susan Wojcicki

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BUSINESS
November 2, 2011 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
A lot of people still don't understand why certain advertisers target them while they are searching the Web. Google is rolling out a new feature that explains why its users see certain ads when they search Google or check their Gmail. The move comes as Google, like other Internet companies, finds itself in the cross hairs of lawmakers and regulators as they scrutinize how consumers' personal information is collected and used online. Google says it tries to be transparent about the information it collects and show consumers the most relevant ads. "Our advertising system is designed to show the right ad to the right person at the right time.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2014 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, This post has been updated, as indicated below
The Internet's most dominant online video site is about to get a new boss. Google ad executive Susan Wojcicki appears will become the next head of YouTube, according to reports published by online sites The Information and Re/code. The executive would succeed Salar Kamangar, who has run the unit since YouTube co-founder Chad Hurley left the company in 2010. A YouTube spokeswoman could not be immediately reached for comment. UPDATE: Confirming the appointment, Google chief executive Larry Page said in a statement, "Salar and the whole YouTube team have built something amazing.  Like Salar, Susan has a healthy disregard for the impossible and is excited about improving YouTube in ways that people will love.
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BUSINESS
November 3, 2011 | By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
Google Inc. is about to add some muscle to its Southern California operations. On Thursday afternoon the company is hosting an opening event for its new 100,000-square-foot campus, located just a few blocks from Venice Beach. Speakers at the event will include Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, who plans to hail the new Google campus a sign of the progress of the city's technology industry, which advocates have begun to call "Silicon Beach. " Google first opened an office in L.A. in 2003 when it acquired Santa Monica-based Applied Semantics, and at that time had only a dozen employees in the area.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
MENLO PARK, Calif. -- Google went back to where it all began Thursday, to the Menlo Park garage where founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin first dreamed of a better search engine. The company opened up the Silicon Valley landmark to the media to celebrate its 15 th birthday. Neighbors say the garage doesn't get the busloads of tourists that regularly visit the Palo Alto garage of Hewlett-Packard or the Los Altos garage where Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak built the first Apple computers.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
MENLO PARK, Calif. -- Google went back to where it all began Thursday, to the Menlo Park garage where founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin first dreamed of a better search engine. The company opened up the Silicon Valley landmark to the media to celebrate its 15 th birthday. Neighbors say the garage doesn't get the busloads of tourists that regularly visit the Palo Alto garage of Hewlett-Packard or the Los Altos garage where Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak built the first Apple computers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2014 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, This post has been updated, as indicated below
The Internet's most dominant online video site is about to get a new boss. Google ad executive Susan Wojcicki appears will become the next head of YouTube, according to reports published by online sites The Information and Re/code. The executive would succeed Salar Kamangar, who has run the unit since YouTube co-founder Chad Hurley left the company in 2010. A YouTube spokeswoman could not be immediately reached for comment. UPDATE: Confirming the appointment, Google chief executive Larry Page said in a statement, "Salar and the whole YouTube team have built something amazing.  Like Salar, Susan has a healthy disregard for the impossible and is excited about improving YouTube in ways that people will love.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
This week Google announced that it will be adding a 'do not track' ( DNT ) option to Chrome, its popular Web browser, by the end of the year. This sounds like a good thing, right? Who likes feeling that their every move is being followed on the Internet? But Google didn't make much of a deal about it. "We undertook to honor an agreement on DNT that the industry reached with the White House early  this year ," a spokesman for the company said in a statement emailed to the Los Angeles Times . "To that end we're making this setting visible in our Chromium developer channel, so that it will be available in upcoming versions of Chrome by year's end. " Not exactly a lot of enthusiasm in there.
BUSINESS
December 1, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera and David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
The decision by European officials to open a formal antitrust investigation of Google Inc. highlights a reality for the online search giant ? its size matters to regulators more than it ever has. Until now, Google has largely faced inquiries focused on specific acquisitions or narrow complaints. A much-rumored deal to buy online discount coupon company Groupon Inc., for example, would be an action that typically would spark an antitrust examination, legal experts said. But the European inquiry announced Tuesday is the broadest yet, investigating whether Google has abused its search-engine dominance to squelch online rivals.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Google's senior ranks continue to shuffle with Jeff Huber stepping down as head of mapping and commerce. Huber will move to Google X, the lab run by Google co-founder Sergey Brin that is working on experimental projects such as the wearable computer Google Glass and self-driving cars, a person familiar with the situation said. The move was first reported by the Wall Street Journal. With Huber's departure, the mapping division will join the Google search team led by Alan Eustace and the commerce division will move under the advertising group led by Susan Wojcicki.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2005 | Chris Gaither, Times Staff Writer
Google Inc.'s stock is cooking, but the Internet giant is having trouble in the kitchen. Google on Thursday announced a global search for two executive chefs to oversee preparation of the company's most celebrated employee perk: free gourmet meals. To help feed the rapidly growing company, Google advertised an opening in December for a second lead chef to help Charlie Ayers, who formerly cooked for the Grateful Dead. Then, in May, Ayers quit to start his own chain of restaurants.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
This week Google announced that it will be adding a 'do not track' ( DNT ) option to Chrome, its popular Web browser, by the end of the year. This sounds like a good thing, right? Who likes feeling that their every move is being followed on the Internet? But Google didn't make much of a deal about it. "We undertook to honor an agreement on DNT that the industry reached with the White House early  this year ," a spokesman for the company said in a statement emailed to the Los Angeles Times . "To that end we're making this setting visible in our Chromium developer channel, so that it will be available in upcoming versions of Chrome by year's end. " Not exactly a lot of enthusiasm in there.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2011 | By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
Google Inc. is about to add some muscle to its Southern California operations. On Thursday afternoon the company is hosting an opening event for its new 100,000-square-foot campus, located just a few blocks from Venice Beach. Speakers at the event will include Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, who plans to hail the new Google campus a sign of the progress of the city's technology industry, which advocates have begun to call "Silicon Beach. " Google first opened an office in L.A. in 2003 when it acquired Santa Monica-based Applied Semantics, and at that time had only a dozen employees in the area.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2011 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
A lot of people still don't understand why certain advertisers target them while they are searching the Web. Google is rolling out a new feature that explains why its users see certain ads when they search Google or check their Gmail. The move comes as Google, like other Internet companies, finds itself in the cross hairs of lawmakers and regulators as they scrutinize how consumers' personal information is collected and used online. Google says it tries to be transparent about the information it collects and show consumers the most relevant ads. "Our advertising system is designed to show the right ad to the right person at the right time.
BUSINESS
December 1, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera and David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
The decision by European officials to open a formal antitrust investigation of Google Inc. highlights a reality for the online search giant ? its size matters to regulators more than it ever has. Until now, Google has largely faced inquiries focused on specific acquisitions or narrow complaints. A much-rumored deal to buy online discount coupon company Groupon Inc., for example, would be an action that typically would spark an antitrust examination, legal experts said. But the European inquiry announced Tuesday is the broadest yet, investigating whether Google has abused its search-engine dominance to squelch online rivals.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2009 | Alana Semuels
Continuing its retreat from traditional media, Google Inc. is bowing out of the radio advertising business. It plans to keep trying to sell ads for streaming audio on the Web. The cutback reflects a general belt-tightening at the Internet giant, which is trying to curb its big spending by shutting down businesses that aren't working.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Internet search leader Google Inc. has added a landmark to its rapidly expanding empire -- the Silicon Valley home where co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin rented a garage eight years ago as they set out to change the world. The Mountain View, Calif.-based company bought the 1,900-square-foot home in nearby Menlo Park from one of its own employees, Susan Wojcicki, who had agreed to lease her garage to the men for $1,700 a month because she wanted some help paying the mortgage.
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