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Susan Wyatt

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A risky new National Endowment for the Arts controversy--emanating from an art show focusing on the AIDS epidemic and containing sexually explicit gay photographs--has broken out here even as the agency struggles to recover from a bruising political fight. Neither the NEA nor the New York City artist organization sponsoring the show, scheduled to open Nov. 16, would discuss the dispute in detail.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A risky new National Endowment for the Arts controversy--emanating from an art show focusing on the AIDS epidemic and containing sexually explicit gay photographs--has broken out here even as the agency struggles to recover from a bruising political fight. Neither the NEA nor the New York City artist organization sponsoring the show, scheduled to open Nov. 16, would discuss the dispute in detail.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Gallery Director Quits: The executive director of a New York art gallery involved in a National Endowment for the Arts controversy in 1989 has resigned. Susan Wyatt quit Artists Space in New York's TriBeCa district after a 17-year association. In November, 1989, Wyatt and Artists Space were involved in a dispute in which NEA Chairman John E. Frohnmayer rescinded a $10,000 grant to support a controversial exhibition--then reversed himself in the face of a protest by arts groups.
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | From Associated Press
The National Endowment for the Arts today reversed itself and awarded a $10,000 grant to an AIDS art exhibit just hours before the show was scheduled to open. Endowment Chairman John E. Frohnmayer, who toured the show and discussed the grant with a group of New York City artists Wednesday, announced the decision. "After consulting with members of the National Council on the Arts, several of whom have also seen the show, I have agreed to approve the request of Artists Space . . .
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Endowment for the Arts on Wednesday impounded a $10,000 grant to a New York City gallery for a show focusing on social aspects of the AIDS epidemic that contains some sexually explicit photographs and other provocative work. The unprecedented action by John E. Frohnmayer, the NEA's chairman, came after the arts endowment and Artists Space, the Manhattan arts organization, were unable to resolve the latest episode in the political crisis that has wracked the NEA since last spring.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1989 | LEAH OLLMAN
The U.S. border with Mexico may be the busiest in the world, and one of the most volatile, but to many New Yorkers, the Hudson River is the border that really counts, the one that distinguishes between two truly disparate realities: New York and the rest of the country. Such insular thinking pervades even the city's most sophisticated circles, and is deeply entrenched in its art community, whose museums, galleries and publications claim to speak for the entire nation.
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI and JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The National Endowment for the Arts, in a clear bid to defuse a risky censorship controversy over an AIDS-related art show in New York City, reversed course Thursday and agreed to release $10,000 in grant money for the exhibit. The announcement of the decision to rescind an order impounding the grant to Artists Space, a Manhattan gallery, was made by NEA Chairman John E. Frohnmayer, who had previewed the show Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts has called for a special session of the endowment's advisory council to try to resolve the new political crisis threatening the government arts agency. Livingston Biddle, who served as the endowment's third chairman from 1977-81 and remains close to influential arts policy leaders in Congress, made the proposal over the weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Endowment for the Arts has awarded 1990 grants to a half dozen arts groups that played key roles in the ongoing NEA political controversy in the face of opposition from certain conservative politicians and groups, NEA sources said Monday. At the same time, however, a national movement seemed to develop to oppose restrictions on federal funding of arts programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scene was a crowded basement press conference room in New York City a week ago today. The occasion was an appearance by the principals in the political drama that had unfolded around an art show focusing on AIDS at the Manhattan gallery Artists Space. The National Endowment for the Arts rescinded a $10,000 grant to defray part of the $30,000 expenses of the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Politicians, artists and movie stars rallied to support the National Endowment for the Arts here Tuesday, transforming what had previously been an annual civics lesson for the nation's arts community into a series of events dominated by urgings for creative enterprises to adopt a "war footing." The annual National Cultural Advocacy Day was a series of diverse public events and private meetings of arts supporters and members of Congress.
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