Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSusana Baca
IN THE NEWS

Susana Baca

ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1998
Between 1958, when Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama arrived in New York, and the late 1960s, when performance began to dominate her art, she created a body of work that made a significant contribution to the contemporary scene. A comprehensive exhibition of works from this period, "Love Forever: Yayoi Kusama, 1958-1968," opens Sunday at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art with paintings, collages, sculptures and reconstructions of three of the artist's environmental installations.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1998 | DON HECKMAN
The Global Divas concert at the Veterans Wadsworth Theater on Sunday brought together three gifted artists from distant parts of the world--Peruvian singer Susana Baca, Mexican American singer Tish Hinojosa and African mbira (or thumb piano) player and singer Stella Chiweshe. Representative of different cultures and musical styles, they nonetheless share several qualities.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2002 | Ernesto Lechner, Special to The Times
Think of the voluptuous Eva Ayllon as an uncontrollable force of nature, wondrous and potentially devastating. A human tornado. A woman whose hip movements can make any man blush like a little boy and whose throaty, potent, chocolaty voice recalls the passion and intensity of Celia Cruz and Cesaria Evora. Yes, Ayllon is a world music diva in the making.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tango master Juan Jose Mosalini's determined crusade to maintain the relevance of the large tango orchestra made its way to the Hollywood Bowl on Sunday in the second of the summer's new world music series. The ensemble was essentially the same as the unit Mosalini has brought to Royce Hall in the past, aided by the valuable presence of dancers Gisela Graef-Marino and Segio Molini, and singer Andres Ramos.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1999 | ERNESTO LECHNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Conceived and hosted by Edward James Olmos at the Kennedy Center in Washington in July, the Americanos Concert was meant to be a global celebration of Latin music, encompassing a wide variety of styles and countries. But the TV show that's been culled from the concert, airing tonight on PBS, is as much about the cliches associated with Latin music as it is about Latin music itself.
NEWS
September 19, 2002
General Categories Record of the year: "Y Solo Se Me Ocurre Amarte," Alejandro Sanz (Humberto Gatica & Kenny O'Brien, producers; Chris Brooke, Humberto Gatica & Eric Shilling, engineers-mixers). Album of the year: "MTV Unplugged," Alejandro Sanz (Humberto Gatica & Kenny O'Brien, producers; Humberto Gatica, Eric Schilling & Chris Brooke, engineers-mixers). Song of the year: "Y Solo Se Me Ocurre Amarte," Alejandro Sanz, songwriter and artist. Best new artist: Jorge Moreno.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2000
all day Movies Bruce Willis, who proved adept at working with a child co-star in last year's "The Sixth Sense," tries it again in "Disney's The Kid." This time, Willis plays a 40-year-old image consultant named Russ Duritz, who literally comes face to face with himself as an 8-year-old called Rusty (newcomer Spencer Breslin).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Zimbabwe musician Stella Chiweshe is one of the few women in the world to master the mbira, or, as it is sometimes described, the thumb piano. And she has done so despite a traditional refusal to allow women to play the instrument, which performs a vital role in spiritual ceremonies of the Shona people.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2006 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
IT'S the last call for the Conga Room. After eight years at its Miracle Mile location on Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles' premier Latin music nightclub is going dark at the end of the month -- at least for now. Although owners plan to reopen in about two years at a new, larger location within the downtown entertainment complex being built across from Staples Center, the demise of the trailblazing club's first incarnation leaves a vacuum in the city's cultural landscape.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|