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Susana Higuchi

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NEWS
October 9, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Alberto Fujimori announced he would seek a second five-year term. Fujimori faces numerous challengers in the April election, including former U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar, Lima Mayor Ricardo Belmont and even his wife, Susana Higuchi. Fujimori can stand for reelection under a new constitution approved last year to replace the one he scrapped in April, 1992, when he closed Congress and the courts with military backing and began ruling by fiat.
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NEWS
October 9, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Alberto Fujimori announced he would seek a second five-year term. Fujimori faces numerous challengers in the April election, including former U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar, Lima Mayor Ricardo Belmont and even his wife, Susana Higuchi. Fujimori can stand for reelection under a new constitution approved last year to replace the one he scrapped in April, 1992, when he closed Congress and the courts with military backing and began ruling by fiat.
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NEWS
September 2, 1994 | ADRIANA VON HAGEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A marital soap opera unfolding at Lima's presidential palace has Peruvians spellbound and tuned to their television sets. Unlike the popular imported soaps from Brazil and Venezuela, grist of Peruvian prime-time television, this one is real and made in Peru: a running dispute between President Alberto Fujimori and his estranged wife, Susana Higuchi. And it has upstaged Fujimori's main rival for next year's presidential elections, Javier Perez de Cuellar, 74.
NEWS
September 2, 1994 | ADRIANA VON HAGEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A marital soap opera unfolding at Lima's presidential palace has Peruvians spellbound and tuned to their television sets. Unlike the popular imported soaps from Brazil and Venezuela, grist of Peruvian prime-time television, this one is real and made in Peru: a running dispute between President Alberto Fujimori and his estranged wife, Susana Higuchi. And it has upstaged Fujimori's main rival for next year's presidential elections, Javier Perez de Cuellar, 74.
NEWS
January 21, 1995 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Javier Perez de Cuellar, the former U.N. secretary general now running for the Peruvian presidency, has injected his campaign with all the excitement of a 300-page U.N. report on South American shipping regulations. Opponents of President Alberto Fujimori had hoped that a diplomat of Perez de Cuellar's stature would inspire the confidence of Peruvian voters, thwarting Fujimori's try for a second term in power. But it hasn't happened so far.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2006 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
The words "absurd," "ridiculous" and "surreal" recur frequently in Ellen Perry's documentary, "The Fall of Fujimori," which traces the surprising rise, initial popularity and eventual implosion amid charges of corruption and murder of former Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori. Perry has compared Fujimori's trajectory to a Shakespearean tragedy, complete with a "bitter and estranged wife, a fiercely loyal daughter, a cruel and diabolical enemy and even a treacherous confidant."
WORLD
June 4, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Phantasms stalk Peru's presidential runoff election. There's the ghost of Hugo Chavez, the radical Venezuelan president who haunts Peruvians who are fearful that he is the model that candidate Ollanta Humala plans to follow. There's the ghost of Alberto Fujimori, the jailed, disgraced former president whose daughter, Keiko, is the other candidate. Many fear she's just a proxy for him. There are ghosts from a war that killed 70,000 people and from a virtual dictatorship that eviscerated many of Peru's democratic institutions.
NEWS
September 16, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA and NATALIA TARNAWIECKI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Peruvian government was shaken Friday by a fresh scandal involving its beleaguered spy chief, Vladimiro Montesinos, after the broadcast of a video allegedly showing him bribing a congressman to support President Alberto Fujimori. Enraged leaders of the opposition demanded the ouster and prosecution of Montesinos, one of this nation's most powerful people who, during 10 years at the president's side, has been accused of electoral dirty tricks and ties to drug lords and death squads.
NEWS
September 20, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to fears that the military is resisting his decision to hold new elections and dismantle Peru's intelligence service, President Alberto Fujimori declared Tuesday that he remains in full control of this crisis-ridden nation. Fujimori spoke for the first time since his announcement Saturday that he will step down after the early elections.
NEWS
July 29, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA and NATALIA TARNAWIECKI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With a pall of smoke and tear gas hanging over Lima's colonial downtown and a cloud of uncertainty hanging over Peru's democracy, President Alberto Fujimori took the oath of office for an unprecedented third term Friday as protesters clashed with a cordon of riot police. Outdoor ceremonies preceding the inauguration in the capital were marred by nearby fighting between demonstrators and about 40,000 riot police.
NEWS
November 22, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a marathon debate that became an outpouring of accumulated rage and political grudges, Peru's Congress on Tuesday rejected President Alberto Fujimori's resignation and instead ousted him on the grounds that he is morally unfit to hold office. The ouster was the political equivalent of an indictment and conviction, a symbolic punishment of Fujimori for the collapse of his scandal-plagued regime and for his decision Monday to resign while in Japan and take refuge there.
NEWS
April 28, 1995 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
According to a theory popularized early this century, wayward Japanese fishermen landed on South America's Pacific shore in the 1400s and stayed to start a dynasty that ruled the Andes. Manco Capac, the legendary founding father of the great Inca Empire, was said to have been an immigrant from Japan posing as a god.
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