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Susannah Mccorkle

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2001 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Susannah McCorkle, a leading cabaret singer who was considered one of the finest interpreters of lyrics in the world of jazz, died Saturday in New York City. She was 55. Police were investigating her death as a suicide, wire services reported, saying she apparently jumped from her Manhattan apartment. Authorities found a suicide note in her apartment but did not reveal its contents.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2001 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Susannah McCorkle, a leading cabaret singer who was considered one of the finest interpreters of lyrics in the world of jazz, died Saturday in New York City. She was 55. Police were investigating her death as a suicide, wire services reported, saying she apparently jumped from her Manhattan apartment. Authorities found a suicide note in her apartment but did not reveal its contents.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1986 | LEONARD FEATHER
Susannah McCorkle has two problems. When she was earning recognition as a writer--one of her short stories won a college fiction contest held by Mademoiselle magazine; another appeared in an O. Henry collection of prize short stories--her literary agent, hearing about her latest singing engagement, cried out: "Singing? Why are you going off on a tangent?"
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1994 | LEONARD FEATHER
Susannah McCorkle, who opened on Tuesday at Catalina Bar & Grill, is a vocal charmer who seems to have a love affair with every song she sings. Whether the lyrics are as hip as Dave Frishberg or as old as Irving Berlin, she is seldom less than totally at ease. Several of her selections Tuesday were drawn from a generally admirable album, "From Bessie to Brazil," that shows the range of her repertoire. Occasionally, however, she trips up.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
There may be more than one living singer who can bring together the songs of Irving Berlin, Bessie Smith, Zoot Sims, Dave Frishberg, Antonio Carlos Jobim and Cole Porter, but none is likely to do so with the seamlessly logical panache that Susannah McCorkle brought to them during her opening show Tuesday at Catalina Bar and Grill in Hollywood. McCorkle interprets every lyric as if she had written it herself--which, in several instances, she did.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1994 | LEONARD FEATHER
Susannah McCorkle, who opened on Tuesday at Catalina Bar & Grill, is a vocal charmer who seems to have a love affair with every song she sings. Whether the lyrics are as hip as Dave Frishberg or as old as Irving Berlin, she is seldom less than totally at ease. Several of her selections Tuesday were drawn from a generally admirable album, "From Bessie to Brazil," that shows the range of her repertoire. Occasionally, however, she trips up.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1987 | DON HECKMAN
Herewith a warning: Susannah McCorkle already has done two shows at the Hollywood Roosevelt's Cinegrill. Only six more nights remain to see and hear one of the country's finest performers of classic American song. In her opening Thursday night, McCorkle quickly made it clear that she is not a singer who takes the easy path. Starting with a rapid-fire rendition of "That's Entertainment," she immediately demonstrated her versatility by easing smoothly into Oscar Brown, Jr.'
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1986 | DON HECKMAN
Susannah McCorkle is an enigma. Described as the best new jazz singer of the '80s, and a self-identified follower of Billie Holiday, she seems to have few of the qualities generally associated with jazz vocalizing. Her Los Angeles debut Sunday night at the Vine St.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1990 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Susannah McCorkle is growing up. Or, at least, her voice is showing definite signs of change. The slightly manic, effervescently off-the-wall McCorkle personality is fine just the way it is. The gifted singer--one of the most visible of the younger performers who are revitalizing the American classic pop song catalogue--opened at Catalina Bar & Grill in Hollywood Tuesday with a richer, darker tone to her singing. "Gosh, it's really exciting," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1986 | LEONARD FEATHER
The quality and quantity of jazz-influenced female vocalists seems to be improving by the month. Following are some of the more interesting items among dozens received in recent weeks: "HOW DO YOU KEEP THE MUSIC PLAYING?" Susannah McCorkle. Pausa 7195. This intelligent, richly rewarding set of a dozen interpretations will appeal to everyone concerned with the classic American popular song tradition. McCorkle's tone, phrasing and sensitivity match her taste in songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
There may be more than one living singer who can bring together the songs of Irving Berlin, Bessie Smith, Zoot Sims, Dave Frishberg, Antonio Carlos Jobim and Cole Porter, but none is likely to do so with the seamlessly logical panache that Susannah McCorkle brought to them during her opening show Tuesday at Catalina Bar and Grill in Hollywood. McCorkle interprets every lyric as if she had written it herself--which, in several instances, she did.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1990 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Susannah McCorkle is growing up. Or, at least, her voice is showing definite signs of change. The slightly manic, effervescently off-the-wall McCorkle personality is fine just the way it is. The gifted singer--one of the most visible of the younger performers who are revitalizing the American classic pop song catalogue--opened at Catalina Bar & Grill in Hollywood Tuesday with a richer, darker tone to her singing. "Gosh, it's really exciting," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1987 | DON HECKMAN
Herewith a warning: Susannah McCorkle already has done two shows at the Hollywood Roosevelt's Cinegrill. Only six more nights remain to see and hear one of the country's finest performers of classic American song. In her opening Thursday night, McCorkle quickly made it clear that she is not a singer who takes the easy path. Starting with a rapid-fire rendition of "That's Entertainment," she immediately demonstrated her versatility by easing smoothly into Oscar Brown, Jr.'
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1986 | DON HECKMAN
Susannah McCorkle is an enigma. Described as the best new jazz singer of the '80s, and a self-identified follower of Billie Holiday, she seems to have few of the qualities generally associated with jazz vocalizing. Her Los Angeles debut Sunday night at the Vine St.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1986 | LEONARD FEATHER
Susannah McCorkle has two problems. When she was earning recognition as a writer--one of her short stories won a college fiction contest held by Mademoiselle magazine; another appeared in an O. Henry collection of prize short stories--her literary agent, hearing about her latest singing engagement, cried out: "Singing? Why are you going off on a tangent?"
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1986 | LEONARD FEATHER
The quality and quantity of jazz-influenced female vocalists seems to be improving by the month. Following are some of the more interesting items among dozens received in recent weeks: "HOW DO YOU KEEP THE MUSIC PLAYING?" Susannah McCorkle. Pausa 7195. This intelligent, richly rewarding set of a dozen interpretations will appeal to everyone concerned with the classic American popular song tradition. McCorkle's tone, phrasing and sensitivity match her taste in songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1993 | LEONARD FEATHER
SUSANNAH McCORKLE "From Bessie to Brazil" Concord Jazz * * * The improbable title is justified: In 1923 Bessie Smith recorded "My Sweetie Went Away," to which vocalist McCorkle brings a Smith-like growl; "Adeus America" (English lyrics by McCorkle) and Jobim's "The Waters of March" are sung in English and Portuguese.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
Susannah McCorkle is infatuated with words. You don't have to know that she speaks four languages to realize this (though it helps). As she wove her way through a somewhat excessively eclectic program Thursday at the Vine St. Bar & Grill, it became clear that she wants to tackle every lyrical obstacle. A tall, attractive blonde who immediately puts you in a New York state of mind, McCorkle has a weakness for schmaltzy songs about show business.
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