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Susanne Blakeslee

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1994 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You have to know musicals to appreciate "Forbidden Broadway 1994," the revue at the Tiffany. Its clever lampoons of Broadway icons might be lost on those who don't. Among its two-dozen sketches is a "Sunset Boulevard" takeoff mounted by the New York-based company for L.A. Without giving away the jokes, let's just say that writer-director Gerard Alessandrini not only puts Glenn Close (Susanne Blakeslee) and Patti LuPone (Christine Pedi) on the same stage and incorporates elements of the "Sunset" plot into their rivalry, but he also throws in Joe (Brad Oscar)
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"A Fairly Odd Christmas," which premieres Thursday on Nickelodeon, is the second (mostly) live-action TV movie to be sprung from the network's long-running cartoon series "The Fairly OddParents" (ninth season coming! 2013!). Though its appeal will be primarily to fans of the show, and its details confusing to everybody else, it should be diverting enough to anyone wanting to consume a few holiday tropes prepared with a pinch of attitude. Written by "OddParents" creator Butch Hartman, and directed, as was last year's "A Fairly Odd Movie: Grow Up, Timmy Turner!
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2009 | Charlotte Stoudt
Mandy Patinkin, watch out. Daniel Radcliffe, take cover (literally). The satirical revue "Forbidden Broadway Greatest Hits, Volume I" has come to Long Beach's Carpenter Performing Arts Center, and it's only just begun. Even the Wicked Witch of the West isn't safe. Gerard Alessandrini's ever-evolving takeoff on American musical theater began in a supper club in 1982 and ran in New York for an astonishing 27 years, spawning international tours and a string of cast albums. With only four performers, a pianist and no set, the show's format is a cash-strapped artistic director's dream.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2009 | Charlotte Stoudt
Mandy Patinkin, watch out. Daniel Radcliffe, take cover (literally). The satirical revue "Forbidden Broadway Greatest Hits, Volume I" has come to Long Beach's Carpenter Performing Arts Center, and it's only just begun. Even the Wicked Witch of the West isn't safe. Gerard Alessandrini's ever-evolving takeoff on American musical theater began in a supper club in 1982 and ran in New York for an astonishing 27 years, spawning international tours and a string of cast albums. With only four performers, a pianist and no set, the show's format is a cash-strapped artistic director's dream.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2001 | BY MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the past 15 years, "Forbidden Broadway" has enabled Susanne Blakeslee to become a grand stage diva, multiplied many times over--and so what if it's only pretend and just for laughs? During the same span, Brad Ellis has put his heartinto making the show rollick and lilt as its piano-pounding sole accompanist and musical director.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"A Fairly Odd Christmas," which premieres Thursday on Nickelodeon, is the second (mostly) live-action TV movie to be sprung from the network's long-running cartoon series "The Fairly OddParents" (ninth season coming! 2013!). Though its appeal will be primarily to fans of the show, and its details confusing to everybody else, it should be diverting enough to anyone wanting to consume a few holiday tropes prepared with a pinch of attitude. Written by "OddParents" creator Butch Hartman, and directed, as was last year's "A Fairly Odd Movie: Grow Up, Timmy Turner!
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2000 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Can you feel the claws tonight? Incoming monsters such as "The Lion King," ninth-life stragglers such as "Cats" and somber whatzits like "Martin Guerre" all get shredded but good--in the nicest way--by the latest incarnation of "Forbidden Broadway," now happily tearing up the curtains at the Tiffany Theater. Musical comedy circa 2000 is the straight man. Writer-director Gerard Alessandrini and his evil henchfolk write the punch lines, the songs that make the whole world sting.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2000 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's an implicit rule of parody that the performer has to be as good as the target, and the touring production of "Forbidden Broadway" at the Hermosa Beach Playhouse handily fulfills that mandate. Under Brad Ellis' musical direction, a quartet of veterans from the off-Broadway revue make hay with Gerard Alessandrini's wickedly satirical lyrics set to show tunes. The selections, culled from a repertoire spanning nearly 20 years, are predominantly aimed at shows and personalities familiar to L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The theater is always losing writers to Hollywood. Now Gerard Alessandrini, the razor-sharp satirist who for years in his revue "Forbidden Broadway" has used theater songs to skewer the foibles of theater folk, turns his scalpel to the movies. I can't imagine anyone will complain about this delightful defection. Except perhaps Patrick Swayze. "Forbidden Hollywood" opened Sunday at the Coronet Theatre, and Patrick, if you're reading, don't see this show.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1994 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some critics make words sing. Gerard Alessandrini, who has an enviable ear for the foibles of Broadway, sings his zingers, or rather his four-person cast does in "Forbidden Broadway '94," now in a marvelously funny production at The Theatre in Old Town. "Forbidden Broadway" began in New York in 1982 when Alessandrini wrote, directed and starred in a small-cast revue poking fun at shows and stars by setting new, wickedly on-target lyrics to familiar melodies.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2001 | BY MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the past 15 years, "Forbidden Broadway" has enabled Susanne Blakeslee to become a grand stage diva, multiplied many times over--and so what if it's only pretend and just for laughs? During the same span, Brad Ellis has put his heartinto making the show rollick and lilt as its piano-pounding sole accompanist and musical director.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1994 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You have to know musicals to appreciate "Forbidden Broadway 1994," the revue at the Tiffany. Its clever lampoons of Broadway icons might be lost on those who don't. Among its two-dozen sketches is a "Sunset Boulevard" takeoff mounted by the New York-based company for L.A. Without giving away the jokes, let's just say that writer-director Gerard Alessandrini not only puts Glenn Close (Susanne Blakeslee) and Patti LuPone (Christine Pedi) on the same stage and incorporates elements of the "Sunset" plot into their rivalry, but he also throws in Joe (Brad Oscar)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1996 | SCOTT COLLINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A man rushes into a cafe. He's distraught; it seems nothing is turning out the way he wants it to. "Relax," a friend tells him. "You're in a Philadelphia." The sufferer of a Philadelphia, we learn, gets exactly the opposite of his stated desire. OK, so maybe "All in the Timing" won't coin a popular catch phrase. But neither will David Ives' anthology of six short comic plays, now at International City Theatre in Long Beach, put viewers in that dreaded Philly mind-set.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
The crackerjack cast of "Forbidden Hollywood" at Hermosa Civic Theatre can't hide the fact that this satirical revue, like many of the aging movie stars it lampoons, isn't getting any younger. Born at L.A.'s Coronet Theatre in 1995, "Forbidden Hollywood" was an attempt by Gerard Alessandrini to apply his wicked wit, famous from his "Forbidden Broadway" revues, to the movies.
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