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Susette S Min

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July 31, 1992 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I wanted to discuss things that aren't usually discussed among the women of the Korean-American community," says Susette S. Min. "Things like sex, domestic violence and eating disorders." And discussing she is. Armed with a prestigious Rockefeller grant, Min, a relative newcomer to the art world, has organized an ambitious multimedia project bringing together 22 visual and video artists from throughout the United States as well as several dance and performance artists to do just that.
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July 31, 1992 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I wanted to discuss things that aren't usually discussed among the women of the Korean-American community," says Susette S. Min. "Things like sex, domestic violence and eating disorders." And discussing she is. Armed with a prestigious Rockefeller grant, Min, a relative newcomer to the art world, has organized an ambitious multimedia project bringing together 22 visual and video artists from throughout the United States as well as several dance and performance artists to do just that.
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April 16, 1999 | CLAUDINE ISE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An absorbing group show at the Municipal Art Gallery titled "The Mourning After: Art of Loss" highlights 12 contemporary artists who explore the complex psychological undercurrents involved in experiences of melancholia, mourning and loss. It sounds like a high-concept group-therapy session, led by the ghost of Sigmund Freud. Indeed, guest curator Susette S. Min relies heavily on the Viennese psychoanalyst's essay "Mourning and Melancholia" for her curatorial premise.
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March 11, 2008 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
There isn't an Asian American aesthetic in contemporary art. There are lots of Asian American artists, but there is no singular, unitary guiding principle for how the art those artists make ought to look, never mind what its subjects should be. Why should there be? Merely on a practical level, an American artist whose ancestry is traced to the Philippines is very different from one traced to Vietnam, Pakistan or Singapore. And Filipinos might be Chinese, indigenous, Spanish or another ethnicity.
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