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Susie Bright

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1990 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Susie Bright, like many feminists, has a strong point of view about pornographic films, but it's not what you think. She is in favor of them. In a big way. And she loves to talk about them, which she will do tonight and Thursday at the Nuart, in a presentation titled "How to Read a Dirty Movie." The program is a combination of hard-core film clips and commentary designed to help curb what Bright sees as the "sexual illiteracy" or "erotophobia" plaguing the moral left as well as the right.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2006 | From Times Staff Reports
William O. Bright, a linguist who studied Native American tongues and worked to preserve the language of California's Karuk tribe, died Sunday of a brain tumor at a hospice near his home in Boulder, Colo. He was 78. Bright was among the first professors of linguistics at UCLA, where he taught for 29 years, retiring in 1988. For 21 years, through 1987, he was editor of Language, the journal of the Linguistic Society of America.
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MAGAZINE
July 24, 1994 | Mark Ehrman, Mark Ehrman, a free-lance writer based in Los Angeles, writes frequently for the magazine's Palm Latitudes section
SUSIE BRIGHT WANTS TO TALK ABOUT SEX. AND somebody, it seems, is always trying to shut her up. Back in 1990, for instance, at one of her erotica lectures, a women's studies class passed out flyers that read: "First, slavery in the Roman Empire . . . then the Holocaust . . . Now, Susie Bright comes to the University of Minnesota." In Northampton, Mass., a hotbed of radical feminist activity, police advised her not to eat out because they feared she'd be attacked by anti-porn fanatics.
HEALTH
September 29, 1997 | ROCHELLE O'GORMAN FLYNN
By Susie Bright, Mollie Katzen, Harriet Lerner, PhD. Sounds True Two cassettes 3 hours, $18.95 Read by the authors Three hours with these women will not cure you of chocoholism, frigidity or that nagging Oedipus complex, but it will surely entertain you. It will also put you on the track of further helpful material. Each woman is refreshingly bright and has something enlightening to say in her area of expertise.
HEALTH
September 29, 1997 | ROCHELLE O'GORMAN FLYNN
By Susie Bright, Mollie Katzen, Harriet Lerner, PhD. Sounds True Two cassettes 3 hours, $18.95 Read by the authors Three hours with these women will not cure you of chocoholism, frigidity or that nagging Oedipus complex, but it will surely entertain you. It will also put you on the track of further helpful material. Each woman is refreshingly bright and has something enlightening to say in her area of expertise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2006 | From Times Staff Reports
William O. Bright, a linguist who studied Native American tongues and worked to preserve the language of California's Karuk tribe, died Sunday of a brain tumor at a hospice near his home in Boulder, Colo. He was 78. Bright was among the first professors of linguistics at UCLA, where he taught for 29 years, retiring in 1988. For 21 years, through 1987, he was editor of Language, the journal of the Linguistic Society of America.
MAGAZINE
August 21, 1994
"Susie Bright Tells All" (by Mark Ehrman, July 24) reveals more than perhaps the subject intended. This crusading sexpert (whatever that is) feels what is wrong with society can be laid at the doorstep of sexual hang-ups and social restrictions. Yet she had a child from an "on and off affair" with a gentleman who "had a fetish for impregnating women." Bright apparently had no other reason for bringing a child into the world other than that he "popped the question just as her biological alarm clock was ringing."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The witty, steamy and audacious "Erotique" is composed of three deft, sexy tales from three of today's most venturesome female filmmakers--the U.S.' Lizzie Borden, Germany's Monika Treut and Hong Kong's Clara Law. Although the film has been rated NC-17 for explicit sex, "Erotique" is not actually hard-core. The filmmakers' clear intent is not pornographic but rather to express a woman's bemused, often complex, view of sexuality.
NEWS
October 13, 1997 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A couple of years ago, Courtney Weaver, overeducated and underwhelmed with the literary job market for twentysomethings, was living the glamorous life of a freelance writer: waiting tables and ripping open the mail to find anonymous rejection slips. Then she read an article about a new Internet magazine and thought she had the perfect topic for a column: her sex life. The fortysomething male editors behind Salon, the Internet start-up, weren't so sure.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Playing with Charles Chaplin's "The Gold Rush" (1925), with its famous shoe-eating sequence, on Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. at the Silent Movie is one of the most rarely seen Louise Brooks films, the 1926 "Love 'Em and Leave 'Em." Based on a novel in verse by John V. A.
MAGAZINE
July 24, 1994 | Mark Ehrman, Mark Ehrman, a free-lance writer based in Los Angeles, writes frequently for the magazine's Palm Latitudes section
SUSIE BRIGHT WANTS TO TALK ABOUT SEX. AND somebody, it seems, is always trying to shut her up. Back in 1990, for instance, at one of her erotica lectures, a women's studies class passed out flyers that read: "First, slavery in the Roman Empire . . . then the Holocaust . . . Now, Susie Bright comes to the University of Minnesota." In Northampton, Mass., a hotbed of radical feminist activity, police advised her not to eat out because they feared she'd be attacked by anti-porn fanatics.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1990 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Susie Bright, like many feminists, has a strong point of view about pornographic films, but it's not what you think. She is in favor of them. In a big way. And she loves to talk about them, which she will do tonight and Thursday at the Nuart, in a presentation titled "How to Read a Dirty Movie." The program is a combination of hard-core film clips and commentary designed to help curb what Bright sees as the "sexual illiteracy" or "erotophobia" plaguing the moral left as well as the right.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1999 | ROBIN RAUZI
It's amazing. Lines and dots and circles turn into letters, letters in certain order turn into words and words strung into sentences turn into stories that transport readers across time, around the globe or into other worlds. Newspapers, magazines, Internet sites--all rely on this ancient system, but none embodies the full weight of such magic like books. Today If you haven't done it yet, get your tickets to the event of your choice at the Festival of Books.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2008 | Swati Pandey, Times Staff Writer
It's hard not to judge Melanie Abrams' recently published debut novel by its cover. Against a background of sensually rumpled burgundy satin sheets is a head of sensually rumpled blond curls, looking downward, eyes in shadow, betraying no expression. Two pale arms stretch upward, spotlighted so they're nearly white, fists clenched, wrists tied with a dark green sash. To the left, the title swoons in matte gold script: "Playing." Abrams, 35, loves the cover. At her reading at Book Soup earlier this month, she flashed the book suggestively, like a trench-coated peddler of dirty magazines, and it won a titter from the crowd.
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