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Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono

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WORLD
October 5, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Retired Gen. Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono was declared Indonesia's next president in a landslide victory and will be inaugurated Oct. 20. Yudhoyono won 60.62% of the vote compared with incumbent Megawati Sukarnoputri's 39.38% in the Sept. 20 election, official results showed. Yudhoyono, 55, gave no specifics on his plans to govern the world's largest Muslim nation.
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WORLD
April 11, 2009 | Paul Watson
Boosting President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono's reelection bid and reform effort, the unofficial results of parliamentary elections released Friday showed his Democratic Party with a strong lead. The party received more than 20% of votes cast in Thursday's general election, according to projections by the Indonesian Survey Institute based on a sample of results from polling stations.
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OPINION
October 25, 2004
Re "Indonesia's First Popularly Elected President Sworn In," Oct. 21: I was impressed with your exhaustive coverage of the myriad issues facing Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, especially considering the recent, and misguided, focus in Indonesia reporting on terrorism alone. But it is wrong, however, to call Indonesia a "Muslim country," when in fact Indonesians are quite proud of their multi-religious composition. The state has no official religion, and the judiciary uses Roman-Dutch, not Sharia, law. This misnomer is equivalent to calling the United States a "Christian country," despite the millions of people who adhere to other religions or no religion at all. This distinction is crucial for better understanding of the world's fourth most populous country and its role, or perhaps lack thereof, in terrorism and our "crusade" against it. Evan White Pasadena
OPINION
October 25, 2004
Re "Indonesia's First Popularly Elected President Sworn In," Oct. 21: I was impressed with your exhaustive coverage of the myriad issues facing Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, especially considering the recent, and misguided, focus in Indonesia reporting on terrorism alone. But it is wrong, however, to call Indonesia a "Muslim country," when in fact Indonesians are quite proud of their multi-religious composition. The state has no official religion, and the judiciary uses Roman-Dutch, not Sharia, law. This misnomer is equivalent to calling the United States a "Christian country," despite the millions of people who adhere to other religions or no religion at all. This distinction is crucial for better understanding of the world's fourth most populous country and its role, or perhaps lack thereof, in terrorism and our "crusade" against it. Evan White Pasadena
OPINION
September 27, 2004
The terrorist bombing in Bali in October 2002, a subsequent attack on the JW Marriott Hotel in Jakarta and the explosion outside the Australian Embassy only 11 days before a presidential runoff election demonstrate the threat from radicals in Indonesia, the world's most populous Muslim nation. President Megawati Sukarnoputri's response was listless; Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, a retired army general who beat Megawati last week, should prove more energetic.
WORLD
September 23, 2004 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
Four-star general. Cabinet minister. Singer. President. Any of these accomplishments might be enough for most people -- but not for Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono. He wants to be called doctor too. On Saturday morning, two days before voters overwhelmingly chose him to be Indonesia's next president, the 55-year-old Yudhoyono appeared before a panel of six scholars and gave a Power Point presentation defending his doctoral thesis.
WORLD
September 21, 2004 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
Former security minister Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono seemed set today to win Indonesia's presidential election, a victory that would mark the first time the country's leader was removed by popular vote. Yudhoyono, a U.S.-trained former general who pledged to revive the economy and crack down on terrorism, was leading President Megawati Sukarnoputri 60% to 40%, with about half of the votes counted.
WORLD
October 21, 2004 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, calling himself an "ordinary citizen from an ordinary family," was sworn in as the country's first popularly elected president Wednesday and pledged to lead a national campaign to fight corruption. The former four-star general and chief security minister, who recently received his doctorate in economics, said he would work to revive Indonesia's struggling economy but warned the public not to expect too much too soon.
WORLD
July 4, 2004 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono is a retired four-star general who likes to sing about peace and love. He served two presidents as security minister but was once fired for refusing to call out troops to save his boss' job. Now, as Indonesians prepare to vote Monday in the country's first direct presidential election, the low-key general has vaulted to the top in public opinion polls, outdistancing all four of his rivals, including President Megawati Sukarnoputri.
WORLD
April 11, 2009 | Paul Watson
Boosting President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono's reelection bid and reform effort, the unofficial results of parliamentary elections released Friday showed his Democratic Party with a strong lead. The party received more than 20% of votes cast in Thursday's general election, according to projections by the Indonesian Survey Institute based on a sample of results from polling stations.
WORLD
October 21, 2004 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, calling himself an "ordinary citizen from an ordinary family," was sworn in as the country's first popularly elected president Wednesday and pledged to lead a national campaign to fight corruption. The former four-star general and chief security minister, who recently received his doctorate in economics, said he would work to revive Indonesia's struggling economy but warned the public not to expect too much too soon.
WORLD
October 5, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Retired Gen. Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono was declared Indonesia's next president in a landslide victory and will be inaugurated Oct. 20. Yudhoyono won 60.62% of the vote compared with incumbent Megawati Sukarnoputri's 39.38% in the Sept. 20 election, official results showed. Yudhoyono, 55, gave no specifics on his plans to govern the world's largest Muslim nation.
OPINION
September 27, 2004
The terrorist bombing in Bali in October 2002, a subsequent attack on the JW Marriott Hotel in Jakarta and the explosion outside the Australian Embassy only 11 days before a presidential runoff election demonstrate the threat from radicals in Indonesia, the world's most populous Muslim nation. President Megawati Sukarnoputri's response was listless; Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, a retired army general who beat Megawati last week, should prove more energetic.
WORLD
September 23, 2004 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
Four-star general. Cabinet minister. Singer. President. Any of these accomplishments might be enough for most people -- but not for Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono. He wants to be called doctor too. On Saturday morning, two days before voters overwhelmingly chose him to be Indonesia's next president, the 55-year-old Yudhoyono appeared before a panel of six scholars and gave a Power Point presentation defending his doctoral thesis.
WORLD
September 21, 2004 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
Former security minister Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono seemed set today to win Indonesia's presidential election, a victory that would mark the first time the country's leader was removed by popular vote. Yudhoyono, a U.S.-trained former general who pledged to revive the economy and crack down on terrorism, was leading President Megawati Sukarnoputri 60% to 40%, with about half of the votes counted.
WORLD
July 4, 2004 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono is a retired four-star general who likes to sing about peace and love. He served two presidents as security minister but was once fired for refusing to call out troops to save his boss' job. Now, as Indonesians prepare to vote Monday in the country's first direct presidential election, the low-key general has vaulted to the top in public opinion polls, outdistancing all four of his rivals, including President Megawati Sukarnoputri.
WORLD
January 28, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono offered rebels in tsunami-hit Aceh province autonomy and an amnesty in exchange for a cease-fire. The rebels have long demanded full independence. The warring sides were expected to start talks in Helsinki, Finland, probably today, to try to reach a formal cease-fire.
WORLD
April 4, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Leaders of Australia and Indonesia signed a partnership agreement that they said would lead to a new security pact. Prime Minister John Howard and President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono signed the framework agreement during Yudhoyono's first visit to Australia as leader of his nation. Indonesia scrapped an earlier defense treaty because Australia participated in a military effort against pro-Jakarta militias in East Timor after that region split with Indonesia in 1999.
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