Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSustainability
IN THE NEWS

Sustainability

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1999
"The Greening of L.A. Schools" (July 21) is not only uplifting but intriguing. The idea of sustainable schools has considerable value, and such value outweighs the start-up costs for sustainability: 1. Each school becomes a model for community sustainability, making it possible to accommodate more population with less demand on resources and with some effect upon the flow of money into and out of a community. 2. Each school becomes necessarily self-sufficient, in case of electric-grid failure, as will happen when a large earthquake hits.
ARTICLES BY DATE
IMAGE
April 21, 2014 | By Melissa Magsaysay, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Eco-conscious and sustainably produced clothing has long been associated with murky-colored, burlap-reminiscent items focused more on sending an Earth-friendly message than on looking runway-ready. So as Earth Day approaches on Tuesday, it's good to know there are now some chic, sustainable options. From sourcing fabrics to creating hangtags, each of the brands highlighted here considers impact on the Earth in production choices and uses recycled materials as often as possible - in some cases, building an entire line on repurposed materials.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
BEER AND POLITICS According to one report, Democratic-leaning drinkers like Heineken while Republican-leaning imbibers prefer Samuel Adams . [National Journal] McSUSTAINABLE McDonald's wants to tell you what "sustainable" beef is .  [Huffington Post] PROP. 37 LIKELY TO PASS, POLL FINDS Supporters of Proposition 37's call to label genetically engineered food outnumber foes of the initiative by a margin of 2 to 1, according to a USC Dornsife/L.A.
FOOD
April 18, 2014 | By Russ Parsons
Cooking and eating more sustainably doesn't require that you rethink your entire life. Here are some simple things you can do to get started. Start canning some of your own pickles and jams when fruits and vegetables are at the peak of season. It will be cheaper than buying store-bought, and likely the quality will be better as well. Grow your own - either plant vegetables in raised beds in the yard or even just put some herbs in pots on a sunny kitchen windowsill. Eat lower on the food chain - take advantage of the whole animal by using off-cuts of meat that others might pass up, such as beef shanks or lamb's necks, and try cooking the less popular small, oily fish, such as mackerel and sardines that don't extract such an environmental cost compared with high-end fish such as salmon.
FOOD
March 11, 2010 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
When Neal and Amy Knoll Fraser move their restaurant Grace downtown to the rectory of St. Vibiana's later this year, diners will be hard-pressed to miss the earth-to-table connection. Fraser intends to plant a garden — and not just a few containers of herbs, but 450 to 500 square feet, right outside, cater-corner from Los Angeles Police Department headquarters. It will be tended by the kitchen staff, and Fraser says it could yield as much as a quarter of the produce for his kitchen.
HOME & GARDEN
March 20, 2010 | Nan Sterman
"Sustainability" is the buzzword on college campuses across the country, where LEED-certified buildings are the new standard. Pitzer College in Claremont, however, takes sustainability to a new level. Tour Pitzer's campus, and along with its LEED dormitories, you'll see the "trayless" dining hall where students scrape leftovers into compost receptacles. The school runs a "green bike" program that refurbishes and redistributes abandoned bicycles each school year. And Pitzer has a gorgeous, sustainable landscape.
HOME & GARDEN
April 18, 2014 | By Marissa Gluck
It's been more than 40 years since architects started embracing green design principles. Spurred by the environmental movement of the 1960s and 1970s, architects began to think about building homes that were more environmentally friendly. Today, green has become standard even as the term itself reaches saturation. Green features such as solar panels, low-flow shower heads and tankless water heaters, once considered cutting-edge, are now commonplace in Southern California. Nearly a quarter of all newly built homes in the U.S. last year were green, according to industry research firm McGraw Hill Construction.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2008 | Jessica Garrison
It's no surprise that Los Angeles should lag behind such emerald stars as Portland, Ore., San Francisco and Seattle in terms of sustainability . . . but Cleveland? Omaha? Dallas? Apparently so. According to the 2008 SustainLane U.S. City Rankings, which rate the nation's 50 largest cities in terms of urban sustainability, Los Angeles is behind those cities, and 21 others as well. The city fell three spots from last year, to No. 28. Why? Here's one clue: Rankings are based on factors including air quality, roadway congestion, sprawl and housing affordability.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2009 | By Tiffany Hsu
During his more than three decades in real estate David Pogue played many roles, but environmental expert was never one of them. That didn't stop his company, Los Angeles real estate brokerage CB Richard Ellis, from naming him the company guru of all things eco-friendly nearly two years ago. Pogue suddenly found himself in charge of making the firm and its projects more energy efficient and environmentally conscious, an abrupt switch from his previous...
BUSINESS
December 27, 2009 | By Tiffany Hsu
The gig: Since taking the job as UC San Diego's first director of strategic energy initiatives in September 2008, Byron Washom has worked to turn the 1,200-acre campus into a model of sustainability, a "living laboratory." Projects include renewable energy, energy management, greenhouse-gas reduction, energy storage systems and greening the campus transportation fleet. The university generates 80% of its own electricity. "The only thing we're looking at, at the campus, are quantum improvements," he said.
FOOD
April 18, 2014 | By Russ Parsons
There's no way around it. In most cases, eating sustainably is probably going to be more expensive and less convenient than simply running down the street to your neighborhood grocery. But if you're interested in where your food comes from and how it gets from the field to your kitchen, here are some Southern California organizations that are making it easier to cook responsibly. Community Seafood: Though Southern California no longer has the thriving commercial fishing community it once did, three women, Sarah Rathbone, Kim Selkoe and Courtney Dietz, are working to connect 40 to 50 of the remaining local fishermen with home cooks in Santa Barbara and Los Angeles.
HEALTH
April 18, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
Here are some ideas for a more sustainable workout - for you and, perhaps, the planet. Walk. No equipment, no driving, no gym. If you're more ambitious, run. No more disposable water bottles. Or paper towels. Go old-school, with push-ups, jumping jacks and other exercises or yoga routines you can do at home. Try grown-up playgrounds. Some city parks have "fitness zones," with outdoor gym equipment. There's one set in La Cienega Park, at the corner of La Cienega and Olympic boulevards, with kids' equipment nearby.
HOME & GARDEN
April 18, 2014 | By Marissa Gluck
It's been more than 40 years since architects started embracing green design principles. Spurred by the environmental movement of the 1960s and 1970s, architects began to think about building homes that were more environmentally friendly. Today, green has become standard even as the term itself reaches saturation. Green features such as solar panels, low-flow shower heads and tankless water heaters, once considered cutting-edge, are now commonplace in Southern California. Nearly a quarter of all newly built homes in the U.S. last year were green, according to industry research firm McGraw Hill Construction.
SPORTS
March 28, 2014 | By Chris Foster
Moving the UCLA basketball program forward is going to be tricky. The Bruins had a good season, reaching an NCAA regional semifinal for the first time since 2008 and pushing top-ranked Florida to the final minutes. For two days in Memphis - pregame and postgame - Coach Steve Alford talked about the "foundation" that was built. Less than 24 hours later, though, that foundation already had a crack. Freshman guard Zach LaVine will declare for the NBA draft, his family said Friday.
SPORTS
March 20, 2014 | Bill Plaschke
SAN DIEGO - He's been on the job nearly a full calendar year, leading a young basketball team to a conference tournament championship while filling a dormant program with energy and hope. Yet Steve Alford's career as UCLA basketball coach doesn't officially begin until right now. Friday night, Viejas Arena, NCAA tournament, opening game, Tulsa waiting. Despair waiting, relief waiting, ghosts waiting. "This is when the UCLA coaching hot seat gets really hot," said Tracy Murray, former Bruins star and current team radio analyst.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2014 | By Teresa Watanabe
When Catherine Aleman and Ana Renteria learned that L.A. Unified might move or close their small school in East Los Angeles, they did what the Academy of Environmental and Social Policy had taught them to do: They tried to make a difference and organized a protest. The students said the academy - an offshoot of Roosevelt High School in Boyle Heights - transformed their lives. The small campus has created close ties with students and teachers who push them toward college and stay after hours to help them with challenges such as Shakespearean prose.
NATIONAL
January 12, 2010 | By Kim Murphy
William Rees spent much of his childhood on his grandfather's farm in the province of Ontario. What struck him once, after a day of working in the fields, was the sudden realization that everything on the dinner table -- the chicken, the milk, the carrots -- he had helped produce. "I was only about 10 years old, and I have no explanation to this day, but I felt as if the ground had fallen beneath me. I was sinking, sinking, deep into the earth," Rees said. When he moved to Vancouver, he took that sense of "connectedness" with him, and never forgot it. With 75% of the globe's 10 billion people in 2050 expected to live in urban areas, they had better -- if they are to survive -- find a similar sense of connection, Rees figured.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
There are years that are remembered for changing the course of human history:1492. 1776. 1945. Then there are years that were predicted to change the course of history. 1844, when Judgment Day didn't materialize. 1910, when Halley's Comet didn't wipe out humanity. And remember Y2K? But rarely does a year arrive with such a mixture of anticipation and dread as 2012. We speak not of the presidential campaign but of the Maya calendar, and the projection that it — or, more accurately, a cycle within it — will end on Dec. 21, 2012.
SPORTS
February 17, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
TEMPE, Ariz. - His $8.5-million contract guarantees him nothing beyond a pile of money. His spring-training locker is among the five corner cubicles reserved for established starting pitchers, but he is as much of a rotation lock as the reporters milling around it. Joe Blanton is back, which says more about the Angels' lack of pitching depth than his status with the club. But that's irrelevant to Blanton, who looks to bounce back from a dismal season in which he went 2-14 with a 6.04 earned-run average and gave up 29 homers.
WORLD
January 25, 2014 | By Amro Hassan
CAIRO -- Before Jan. 25, 2011, I rarely spent time in Tahrir Square. For me, like millions of other Cairenes, it was no more than a busy downtown traffic hub you'd pass through on the way to somewhere else. So it still seems surreal to recall the first protest against longtime ruler Hosni Mubarak three years ago - and the cascade of events that have taken place in the square since I was there that day reporting for the Los Angeles Times. Police easily dispersed that initial gathering of a few hundred protesters on Jan. 25, and I remember wandering around an almost empty square late that afternoon, trying to find an open eatery.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|