Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSustainable Fashion
IN THE NEWS

Sustainable Fashion

FEATURED ARTICLES
IMAGE
October 14, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Call it the H&M effect, or fast fashion. Americans are buying, and discarding, clothes more quickly than ever. On average, each of us throws 54 pounds of clothes and shoes into the trash each year. That adds up to about 9 million tons of shoes, jackets and other wearables that are sent into the waste stream annually, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Traditionally, the options for dealing with that waste have started with an R: Reduce, reuse or recycle. But a clutch of designers, some of them high-end, are pursuing a different tack.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | By Lisa Boone
Early last year, Scott Tannen and his wife, Missy Tannen , were shopping for sheets when they experienced firsthand the confusion that comes in trying to find quality sheets. “I just wanted a beautiful, soft set of white sheets,” Missy Tannen said. “Every display was full of nebulous buzzwords like 'thread count,' and the prices seemed really high. The longer I stared at the shelves, the more confused I became. I had no confidence that I would walk out of the store with something great.” Motivated by that shopping experience, the couple founded Boll & Branch in January in an effort to offer 100% organic cotton sheets directly to consumers from Chetna Organic, an Indian cooperative that supports sustainable farming and community development.
Advertisement
IMAGE
March 21, 2010 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
In a new twist on sustainable fashion, designers aren't just embracing new fabrics made from organic cotton, hemp or bamboo, they're pawing through piles of clothing waste, crafting high-fashion, hand-made items from old cashmere sweaters, T- shirts and other castoffs. In the U.S., there's a lot to choose from. Almost 9 million tons of clothes and shoes end up in the municipal waste stream each year, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. "Most sustainable fashion is focused on substituting materials, whether it's going from conventional cotton to organic, or from [synthetic]
NATIONAL
May 31, 2013 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE - The seal looked appealing, a daisy on a field of green, with the words “Tested Green.” It was issued to more than 120 products as a guarantee of environmental responsibility. The problem, federal trade regulators announced in 2011, was that almost anybody who wanted to pay the $189.95 for a “rapid” certification got a logo. “It took us about 30 seconds to have the Federal Trade Commission certified as 'tested green,' and we were neither tested nor green,” Jim Kohm, head of the FTC's enforcement division, said Thursday.
IMAGE
April 25, 2010 | By Sophia Kercher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For almost a year, Sheena Matheiken has lived her life as a calendar girl for sustainable fashion. A New Yorker who is originally from India, she is the creator of the Uniform Project, a fashion blog that has steadily gained followers worldwide. The blog features the pixie-like Matheiken wearing one of seven identical little black dresses every day of the year, transforming the simple garment into a year's worth of eclectic looks by inventive accessorizing. She never repeats an ensemble.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | By Lisa Boone
Early last year, Scott Tannen and his wife, Missy Tannen , were shopping for sheets when they experienced firsthand the confusion that comes in trying to find quality sheets. “I just wanted a beautiful, soft set of white sheets,” Missy Tannen said. “Every display was full of nebulous buzzwords like 'thread count,' and the prices seemed really high. The longer I stared at the shelves, the more confused I became. I had no confidence that I would walk out of the store with something great.” Motivated by that shopping experience, the couple founded Boll & Branch in January in an effort to offer 100% organic cotton sheets directly to consumers from Chetna Organic, an Indian cooperative that supports sustainable farming and community development.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Adam Tschorn
We've just received word that due to the effects of super storm Sandy, the deadline for designer submissions to the 2 013 Red Carpet Green Dress competition , initially set for Nov. 5, has been extended by 10 days to Nov. 15. Organizers of the challenge released the following statement: "To accommodate designers in the USA, Cuba and Haiti who have been struggling, due to Superstorm Sandy, to finish materials by November 5th, Suzy Amis...
NEWS
November 13, 2012 | By Susan Denley
Young lovers Selena Gomez and Justin Bieber have reportedly split up, due to the conflicting demands of their busy careers. [Los Angeles Times] The news broke on the day Gomez was being honored as one of Glamour's Women of the Year at a fete in New York's Carnegie Hall, where Ethan Hawke presented her with the Independent Spirit Award. Among other honorees were actress Lena Dunham, photographer Annie Liebovitz, J. Crew's Jenna Lyons and Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg.
IMAGE
February 26, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Despite a growing embrace of environmentalism among many designers, so-called sustainable fashion continues to conjure notions of burlap. Awards show commentators rarely use the term - elegance just isn't synonymous with eco-friendly living. But at the Academy Awards, Missi Pyle, part of the ensemble cast of"The Artist," will walk the red carpet in a flowing blue gown made from organic silk, hand-dyed with natural mineral pigments and lined with recycled polyester. The gown was designed by Valentina Delfino, one of hundreds of designers around the world who submitted sketches to the third annual sustainable couture competition known as Red Carpet Green Dress in the hopes of presenting their creations on the most glamorous - and watched - red carpet in the world.
NATIONAL
May 31, 2013 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE - The seal looked appealing, a daisy on a field of green, with the words “Tested Green.” It was issued to more than 120 products as a guarantee of environmental responsibility. The problem, federal trade regulators announced in 2011, was that almost anybody who wanted to pay the $189.95 for a “rapid” certification got a logo. “It took us about 30 seconds to have the Federal Trade Commission certified as 'tested green,' and we were neither tested nor green,” Jim Kohm, head of the FTC's enforcement division, said Thursday.
NEWS
November 13, 2012 | By Susan Denley
Young lovers Selena Gomez and Justin Bieber have reportedly split up, due to the conflicting demands of their busy careers. [Los Angeles Times] The news broke on the day Gomez was being honored as one of Glamour's Women of the Year at a fete in New York's Carnegie Hall, where Ethan Hawke presented her with the Independent Spirit Award. Among other honorees were actress Lena Dunham, photographer Annie Liebovitz, J. Crew's Jenna Lyons and Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Adam Tschorn
We've just received word that due to the effects of super storm Sandy, the deadline for designer submissions to the 2 013 Red Carpet Green Dress competition , initially set for Nov. 5, has been extended by 10 days to Nov. 15. Organizers of the challenge released the following statement: "To accommodate designers in the USA, Cuba and Haiti who have been struggling, due to Superstorm Sandy, to finish materials by November 5th, Suzy Amis...
IMAGE
October 14, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Call it the H&M effect, or fast fashion. Americans are buying, and discarding, clothes more quickly than ever. On average, each of us throws 54 pounds of clothes and shoes into the trash each year. That adds up to about 9 million tons of shoes, jackets and other wearables that are sent into the waste stream annually, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Traditionally, the options for dealing with that waste have started with an R: Reduce, reuse or recycle. But a clutch of designers, some of them high-end, are pursuing a different tack.
IMAGE
February 26, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Despite a growing embrace of environmentalism among many designers, so-called sustainable fashion continues to conjure notions of burlap. Awards show commentators rarely use the term - elegance just isn't synonymous with eco-friendly living. But at the Academy Awards, Missi Pyle, part of the ensemble cast of"The Artist," will walk the red carpet in a flowing blue gown made from organic silk, hand-dyed with natural mineral pigments and lined with recycled polyester. The gown was designed by Valentina Delfino, one of hundreds of designers around the world who submitted sketches to the third annual sustainable couture competition known as Red Carpet Green Dress in the hopes of presenting their creations on the most glamorous - and watched - red carpet in the world.
IMAGE
April 25, 2010 | By Sophia Kercher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For almost a year, Sheena Matheiken has lived her life as a calendar girl for sustainable fashion. A New Yorker who is originally from India, she is the creator of the Uniform Project, a fashion blog that has steadily gained followers worldwide. The blog features the pixie-like Matheiken wearing one of seven identical little black dresses every day of the year, transforming the simple garment into a year's worth of eclectic looks by inventive accessorizing. She never repeats an ensemble.
IMAGE
March 21, 2010 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
In a new twist on sustainable fashion, designers aren't just embracing new fabrics made from organic cotton, hemp or bamboo, they're pawing through piles of clothing waste, crafting high-fashion, hand-made items from old cashmere sweaters, T- shirts and other castoffs. In the U.S., there's a lot to choose from. Almost 9 million tons of clothes and shoes end up in the municipal waste stream each year, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. "Most sustainable fashion is focused on substituting materials, whether it's going from conventional cotton to organic, or from [synthetic]
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2005 | Booth Moore, Times Staff Writer
It was the most hyped debut in the history of L.A.'s Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week. Just 30 years old, Carlos Rosario certainly has an impressive pedigree. He was a former assistant at Christian Dior Homme in Paris who also worked with Academy Award-winning Hollywood costume designer Colleen Atwood, creating fabrics for Jim Carrey's costumes in "Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events."
NEWS
January 6, 2008 | Garance Burke, Associated Press
In a workshop in the city's Mission District, Ally Beran's team of fashion designers is sprawled out over buttons and spools of thread, hoping to stem global warming by stitching new outfits from thrift-store finds. A brown lace applique from a scrap bin could make last year's castoff cashmere really pop, Beran muses. Or swatches from a tattered leather jacket could double as chic epaulets on a high-end used sweater. Designers of sustainable fashion are not only dominating New York catwalks and urban boutique racks this winter; many also are providing farmers with new markets.
NEWS
January 6, 2008 | Garance Burke, Associated Press
In a workshop in the city's Mission District, Ally Beran's team of fashion designers is sprawled out over buttons and spools of thread, hoping to stem global warming by stitching new outfits from thrift-store finds. A brown lace applique from a scrap bin could make last year's castoff cashmere really pop, Beran muses. Or swatches from a tattered leather jacket could double as chic epaulets on a high-end used sweater. Designers of sustainable fashion are not only dominating New York catwalks and urban boutique racks this winter; many also are providing farmers with new markets.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2005 | Booth Moore, Times Staff Writer
It was the most hyped debut in the history of L.A.'s Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week. Just 30 years old, Carlos Rosario certainly has an impressive pedigree. He was a former assistant at Christian Dior Homme in Paris who also worked with Academy Award-winning Hollywood costume designer Colleen Atwood, creating fabrics for Jim Carrey's costumes in "Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|