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Sustainable Seas Expeditions

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1999 | SARAH YANG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the skies grow dark, what kinds of predators might rise from the ocean's depths to feed? When great white sharks interact with each other, do they follow clan-based hierarchies similar to those of wolves or lions? How are humans affecting the health of the marine ecosystem, and what can be done to conserve the ocean's resources? Marine scientists have long yearned to answer these questions and more, but the cost of research and available technology limited their ability to do so.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1999 | SARAH YANG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the skies grow dark, what kinds of predators might rise from the ocean's depths to feed? When great white sharks interact with each other, do they follow clan-based hierarchies similar to those of wolves or lions? How are humans affecting the health of the marine ecosystem, and what can be done to conserve the ocean's resources? Marine scientists have long yearned to answer these questions and more, but the cost of research and available technology limited their ability to do so.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1999 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Skies were sullen, the sea was flat and only fishermen and pelicans were awake at 7 a.m. as the research ship Ballena chugged out of Channel Islands Harbor on Thursday to join the Sustainable Seas Expeditions off Ventura County's coast. The destination was an outcrop of rock on the island's north shore, where 30 high school students, dozens of scuba divers, scientists, a TV star and a deep-water submarine joined the exploration of the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1998 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Down under the sea, far below the dolphins, way, way beyond the eerily undulating kelp forests of the Channel Islands is a world no human eyes have ever seen. But starting next year, explorers will be able to plumb the pelagic depths of the sprawling Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary in two tiny one-person submarines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1999 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The value of the waters off Ventura County is more than surface deep. They are an aquarium, home to 25 shark species, elephant seals and the world's largest concentration of the largest animals ever, blue whales. They are a factory, where cold currents from Alaska and warm water from Baja churn in a nutrient broth to pump energy through the food web. They support an industry of squid, urchin and rockfish. And this week, these waters become a laboratory.
NEWS
May 5, 1998 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Down under the sea, far below the dolphins, way, way beyond the eerily undulating kelp forests is a world no human eyes have ever seen. But starting next year, explorers will be able to plumb the depths of the sprawling Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary in two tiny one-person submarines. And that is just one part of what scientists will be able to do, as part of a $6-million, five-year project to explore, document and provide scientific data on America's 12 national marine sanctuaries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1999 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Designers unveiled their vision for a waterfront aquarium and marine learning center for Ventura Harbor on Wednesday, saying its value to local schools and its focus on the Santa Barbara Channel's unique environment make it an attractive alternative to bigger West Coast rivals. The two-story Channel Islands Marine Learning Center and Aquarium would house more than 1 million gallons of water in indoor glass tanks filled with kelp forests, a small pier and a sea cave.
NEWS
May 14, 2000
Rosa Broadous Age: 81 Residence: Pacoima Accomplishments: Founding member, Valley branch of the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People; volunteer, VISTA; member, Valley Interfaith Council; member, Northeast Valley Optimists; life member, PTA; literacy tutor, Calvary Baptist Church; "Queen Mother" award recipient, National Council of Negro Women. * The telephone call was to Calvary Baptist Church in Pacoima: "Mrs. Broadous, please." Short pause. "Mother Broadous?"
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