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Susumu Tonegawa

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August 17, 2008 | Barry Hatton, Associated Press
When Zachary Mainen told colleagues that he was quitting his job as associate professor at a top U.S. research institute to pursue his career in Western Europe's poorest country, they were puzzled. The American neuroscientist swapped Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York for Portugal's Champalimaud Foundation. "At first people were surprised I'd do that," said Mainen, 39, who left his U.S. job in April. "But after they heard what's going on, they were less surprised. . . ." The foundation was "offering conditions comparable to what I might have in the U.S."
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NEWS
August 17, 2008 | Barry Hatton, Associated Press
When Zachary Mainen told colleagues that he was quitting his job as associate professor at a top U.S. research institute to pursue his career in Western Europe's poorest country, they were puzzled. The American neuroscientist swapped Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York for Portugal's Champalimaud Foundation. "At first people were surprised I'd do that," said Mainen, 39, who left his U.S. job in April. "But after they heard what's going on, they were less surprised. . . ." The foundation was "offering conditions comparable to what I might have in the U.S."
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NEWS
September 22, 1987 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer and
A Caltech molecular geneticist whose research has helped to revolutionize genetic engineering and biology is among the winners of this year's prestigious Lasker Basic Medical Research Award, it was announced Monday. Dr. Leroy Hood, chairman of Caltech's biology department, and Dr. Philip Leder of Harvard and Dr. Susumu Tonegawa of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology share the 1987 award for discovering the structure of antibodies. A fourth winner is Dr.
NEWS
December 11, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
President Oscar Arias Sanchez of Costa Rica accepted the 1987 Nobel Peace Prize on Thursday, urging the superpowers to stop meddling in Central America and let the region solve its own problems. "If they cannot refrain from amassing weapons of war, then in the name of God, at least they should leave us in peace," Arias said in his speech accepting the prize, which includes a 23-carat Nobel medallion and a monetary award valued at about $350,000.
NEWS
October 12, 1987 | Associated Press
Susumu Tonegawa of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology today won the 1987 Nobel Prize in medicine for discovering how the body is able to produce thousands of different antibodies to fight disease. In its citation, the Nobel Assembly said Tonegawa had shown in a pioneering set of experiments how the body's immune cells reshuffle their genetic material to recognize and attack invading organisms that the body has never seen before.
SCIENCE
July 25, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
In courtrooms, on therapists' couches and across the kitchen table, we count on the trustworthiness of our memories. But brain scientists are increasingly demonstrating that our recollections don't exactly deserve the faith we put in them. They can be self-servingly Photoshopped, nudged off the mark by suggestion, and corrupted by being dragged out and rehashed. Just how flimsy are the foundations of memory? So flimsy that in a neuroscience lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, researchers were able to fabricate fearful memories and implant them in the brains of mice using a few electrical probes, some photo-sensitive chemicals and a miniature flashlight.
NEWS
October 15, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Two American chemists, including UCLA's Donald J. Cram, and a Frenchman have won the 1987 Nobel Prize in chemistry, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced Wednesday. The chemists were honored for their work over the last two decades in making relatively uncomplicated compounds that perform the same biological functions as natural proteins.
NEWS
July 10, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
For the first time, a single gene has been linked to the learning process. Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Salk Institute in La Jolla report today in the journal Science that their findings with mice provide insight into the biochemical process by which the brain learns, particularly into how connections between brain cells are strengthened to form memories.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Molecular biologists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology report that they have isolated and identified the "master builder" gene that controls the disease-fighting process, marshaling its forces like a general preparing to repel an enemy invasion. The discovery, reported in today's Cell journal, should provide fundamental new insights into how the immune system functions, according to pathologist Michael Lieber of Stanford University. "I would think it would be one of the top 10 . . .
NEWS
October 13, 1987 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer
Susumu Tonegawa, a Japanese-born geneticist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, was awarded the 1987 Nobel Prize for Medicine on Monday for explaining how the immune system is able to make a seemingly limitless variety of antibodies to protect the body from foreign substances.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1987
Dr. Leroy Hood, a Caltech molecular geneticist, in September was one of three scientists to win the prestigious Lasker Basic Medical Research Award for helping explain how the immune system creates an almost endless variety of antibodies to protect the human body from foreign invaders. The immune system is believed crucial to curing many of man's diseases, a fact reflected in the number of Nobel prizes granted in this field.
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