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Suu Kyi

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OPINION
May 22, 2009
The military junta that runs Myanmar has sought to silence its leading critic by holding her under house arrest for 13 of the last 19 years. Yet the longer Aung San Suu Kyi remains in detention, the more powerful she becomes. The generals first locked her away in 1990, but if they believed she would fade from view, they were badly mistaken. The next year, she won the Nobel Peace Prize.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Simon Roughneen
YANGON, Myanmar - Win Tin, one of Myanmar's most respected opposition leaders who was jailed for nearly two decades by his country's military rulers, died early Monday. He was 84. His death, attributed to organ failure, came as Myanmar marked the end of Thingyan, the Buddhist New Year, and five weeks after he was admitted to Yangon's main hospital on the evening of his 84th birthday. A former journalist who in 1988 co-founded the National League for Democracy Party with his longtime ally, Aung San Suu Kyi, Win Tin was one of the most prominent leaders of the movement to challenge the military junta that ruled what was then known as Burma.
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WORLD
May 27, 2009 | Associated Press
Opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi marked six years of continuous detention by Myanmar's military regime today, as she defends herself in court on charges that she violated the law by sheltering an uninvited American at her home. Suu Kyi testified Tuesday that she did not violate the law. The trial, which opened Monday and is expected to end in a guilty verdict, has continued despite international outcry.
WORLD
June 6, 2013 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI -- Most politicians coyly deny they want to lead their country until the last possible minute, but Myanmar opposition leader and Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi dispensed with the usual pleasantries Thursday and announced unequivocally her desire to be president two years before the 2015 election.    Although she's expressed interest before, the timing and venue, a packed meeting of the World Economic Forum in Naypyidaw, Myanmar's capital, was designed for impact. "I want to run for president and I'm quite frank about it," she told a panel.
WORLD
May 19, 2009 | Associated Press
Democracy activist Aung San Suu Kyi was put on trial behind closed doors Monday, police ringing the prison court to deter supporters who say she is being prosecuted to keep her out of politics. Despite the closed nature of the trial, a U.S. consular official was allowed in because an American, John William Yettaw, is also a defendant. He prompted the charges against Suu Kyi by swimming to her property and sneaking into her home where she is being held under house arrest.
NEWS
September 19, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey
President Obama will meet Wednesday with Myanmar activist Aung San Suu Kyi, the White House said. The human rights advocate and member of the Myanmar National Assembly is visiting the U.S. for the first time in two decades, after a lengthy series of house arrests from 1989 to 2010. Her tour includes a meeting with the Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and leaders on the Hill, who will award her the Congressional Gold Medal. Suu Kyi, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate, was initially awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 2008 during a house arrest imposed by Myanmar's military junta.
WORLD
December 23, 2012 | By Morgan Little
Though some have claimed that 2012 was “the best year ever” on a global scale, it certainly doesn't seem that way from a cursory glance at the headlines. Civil wars, revolutions and natural disasters seemed as rampant as ever, but amid the chaos, there appeared to be steps in the right direction. In the Middle East, the "Arab Spring" continued to revolutionize the region. Egypt's elections, which brought Mohamed Morsi to power, have since sparked fighting between his supporters and those accusing him of trying to consolidate power . There was the continuing crisis in Syria ; an increasingly isolated and nuclear-ambitious Iran; yet another military flare-up between Israelis and Palestinians; and the lethal attack on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi , Libya, prompted political controversy in the U.S. The Great Recession clung to Europe, with Greece and Spain particularly volatile as citizens resisted austerity measures . The European Union won the Nobel Peace Prize , but violent protests in Athens and beyond tested fiscal resolve.
WORLD
May 26, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Myanmar's military government extended the house arrest of pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi for another year, defying an outpouring of international appeals for the Nobel Peace Prize laureate's freedom. Suu Kyi, 60, has spent more than 11 of the last 17 years in detention and most of the last four years confined to her residence in Yangon, the largest city in Myanmar, also known as Burma.
WORLD
October 18, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell denounced Myanmar's detention of democracy activist Aung San Suu Kyi as "a travesty" and said he and President Bush would press Asian nations in meetings this weekend to adopt a tougher stance on the regime. Speaking to reporters as he flew to Bangkok, Thailand, for the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum, Powell said the U.S. would raise concerns about the treatment of Suu Kyi and the response of Asian nations.
NEWS
September 3, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Myanmar pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi denied as "bogus" military accusations that she has conspired against the government and said she is prepared to be arrested. Col. Kyaw Thein, a high-ranking intelligence officer, accused Suu Kyi of breaking Myanmar law by meeting and colluding with outlawed expatriate dissident groups. In an interview, Suu Kyi admitted she had met some of the people the military listed but insisted she had not violated any laws.
WORLD
April 15, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Testing the waters for a revitalized Asian alliance Now through Saturday, April 20: Democracy activist Aung San Suu Kyi's visit to Japan this week is purportedly unofficial, but the Nobel Peace Prize laureate probably has more clout than any Myanmar government delegation in charting a course for repairing business and social ties between Tokyo and her homeland. Japan's investments in Myanmar after half a century of military dictatorship pale in comparison with the billions being pumped in by China, Thailand and India.
WORLD
March 8, 2013 | By Mark Magnier, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
NEW DELHI, India -- Myanmar's main opposition party led by Nobel laureate lawmaker Aung San Suu Kyi began three days of meetings in Yangon on Friday to elect leaders for the first time in its 25-year history. The fact that the government allowed the general assembly of the once-banned party is in itself a milestone in a country emerging from decades of repressive military rule. Suu Kyi, who spent 15 years under detention before her release in late 2010, is widely expected to be reappointed party head.
WORLD
December 23, 2012 | By Morgan Little
Though some have claimed that 2012 was “the best year ever” on a global scale, it certainly doesn't seem that way from a cursory glance at the headlines. Civil wars, revolutions and natural disasters seemed as rampant as ever, but amid the chaos, there appeared to be steps in the right direction. In the Middle East, the "Arab Spring" continued to revolutionize the region. Egypt's elections, which brought Mohamed Morsi to power, have since sparked fighting between his supporters and those accusing him of trying to consolidate power . There was the continuing crisis in Syria ; an increasingly isolated and nuclear-ambitious Iran; yet another military flare-up between Israelis and Palestinians; and the lethal attack on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi , Libya, prompted political controversy in the U.S. The Great Recession clung to Europe, with Greece and Spain particularly volatile as citizens resisted austerity measures . The European Union won the Nobel Peace Prize , but violent protests in Athens and beyond tested fiscal resolve.
WORLD
November 21, 2012 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
YANGON, Myanmar - Maung Thura, a comedian known as Zarganar, is a barrel of a man, stocky with a shaved head and a deep, forceful voice that seems out of place among the fluorescent lights and office furniture of the Home media group he recently helped found. Zarganar's biting wit and open criticism of repression in recent decades often irked Myanmar's government, which jailed him for 11 years on such charges as "public order offenses," including five spent in solitary confinement.
WORLD
November 19, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey
YANGON, Myanmar -- President Obama was greeted by thousands of people here Monday, a sea of smiling faces and tiny American flags filling the streets in a place where even small public gatherings once caused government suspicion. But it was the U.S. president who was laying out the welcome mat. Obama flew to Myanmar as a gesture to symbolically welcome the long-isolated Southeast Asian nation back to the international fold. After decades of harsh authoritarian rule, the government's recent steps toward democratic reforms -- epitomized by its release in 2010 of iconic dissident Aung San Suu Kyi -- earned it its first U.S. presidential visit, along with a fresh cache of aid and other support.
WORLD
November 19, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Los Angeles Times
YANGON, Myanmar - Barack Obama was riding in his motorcade, the first U.S. president to visit long-isolated Myanmar, when he suddenly ordered an unscheduled detour Monday. The Secret Service scrambled. Police raced ahead to clear crowded roads. Tourists were chased away. Soon Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton were barefoot in the muggy afternoon. They hiked up a long set of marble stairs and took in the 325-foot-tall Shwedagon Pagoda, which is covered with gilt leaf and topped by a jewel-encrusted spire.
WORLD
September 19, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Danielle Ryan, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Myanmar's opposition leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, met privately with President Obama after accepting Congress' highest honor in an emotional ceremony Wednesday, signs of the stunning shift in U.S. relations with the onetime pariah Asian nation over the last year. The Obama administration not only welcomed the former political prisoner and Nobel laureate, but it offered a gesture of goodwill by easing sanctions against Myanmar's leaders, as Suu Kyi has urged since she arrived Monday on a 17-day U.S. tour, including a visit to Los Angeles.
WORLD
November 9, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi will not accept freedom from house arrest until Myanmar's ruling junta releases all those arrested with her in May, a U.N. envoy said. Paulo Sergio Pinheiro met with Suu Kyi at her lakeside home on Thursday and said 35 people remain in jail in connection with a bloody clash May 30 between Suu Kyi's supporters and a pro-junta mob. The government said after the clash that Suu Kyi was being detained under an emergency security law.
WORLD
November 18, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
From a tiny Afghan bakery to China's Great Hall of the People, here are five stories you shouldn't miss from this past week in global news: Bleakness only a child's smile can lift Kenyan information minister leads an IT revolution China's new party leader eschews predecessors' rhetoric Israel attack on Gaza: Familiar tension, new circumstances Suu Kyi's piano tuners play small but key part in Myanmar history ...
WORLD
November 18, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey
Yangon, Myanmar  - President Obama on Monday became the first U.S. president to visit Myanmar, a once-secretive nation emerging from decades of authoritarian rule. Obama is expected to urge the Southeast Asian country's government to stay the course toward democratic reforms. The White House has billed his visit as a celebration of the recent shift by the government of President Thein Sein, symbolized most publicly by the release of dissident Aung San Suu Kyi in 2010 after years of house arrest.
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