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Suzan Lori Parks

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2006 | Mike Boehm
Oprah may know how to get the whole country reading the same book, but Pulitzer Prize-winner Suzan-Lori Parks has come up with a way to get it performing the same plays, week after week, for an entire year. From Nov. 13, 2002, to Nov. 12, 2003, Parks wrote a short play each day. Now comes "365 days/365 plays," conceived and produced by Parks and Bonnie Metzgar. Billed as the largest theatrical collaboration in U.S.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
'The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess' (PS Classics) Gershwin purists, this "Porgy and Bess" is probably not for you, even though its official title is "The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess. " The cast album of the current Broadway production is a streamlined version of a score that can run longer than three hours when done in its entirety. This two-disc recording is not just shorter, but it also takes liberties that have rankled traditionalists. "Summertime" is performed as a romantic duet; sections of recitative have been converted to spoken dialogue; and the orchestra has been scaled down for a Broadway house.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1993 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Suzan-Lori Parks is in a curious situation. It took so long for her 1986-89 play, "Imperceptible Mutabilities in the Third Kingdom," to finally receive a full production in Los Angeles that, as she tells it, the play now reflects a chapter of her life that has been securely closed. "Oh yeah, I've moved past that one," she said confidently on the phone from her New York home. "When I did it, it was done, and I moved on."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2008 | Diane Haithman
It looks like the Big Orange is soon to lose another playwright to the Big Apple. Suzan-Lori Parks, the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright ("Topdog/Underdog"), has been awarded the first Master Writer Chair at the Public Theater in New York City. Funded by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the full-salaried post affords the chosen writer the chance to develop his or her work using the resources of the Public Theater and to participate in "the artistic life of the theater."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2003 | Renee Tawa, Times Staff Writer
Oh, there she is, the raging wildfire of a playwright Suzan-Lori Parks, who zips toward the outdoor stage in chunky sandals five minutes before her first-ever reading of her much-anticipated debut novel. Under the coolness of sycamore trees, an audience of about 75 waits on folding chairs on a UCLA lawn. It's a sleepy scene compared to the electric Broadway opening last April of her Pulitzer Prize-winning play, "Topdog/Underdog," in a 1,125-seat theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2006 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
IF Suzan-Lori Parks and Bonnie Metzgar could sell Chevys the way they're selling plays -- without a test drive, without even a peek under the hood -- they'd be rescuing General Motors instead of Pied Pipering several hundred American theater companies toward destinations unknown. Parks is the livewire MacArthur "genius" grantee and Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright of "Topdog/Underdog." Metzgar, her low-key friend of 20 years, is producer, artistic confidante and, for this mission, her prod.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2002 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Suzan-Lori Parks is very much the top dog of Southern California playwrights at the moment, even though her work has hardly been seen in the Southland. Parks, 38, who lives in Venice, won the Pulitzer Prize on Monday for "Topdog/Underdog," a day after the play opened on Broadway to positive reviews. Her Pulitzer triumph followed an announcement last fall that she won one of the annual $500,000 fellowships from the MacArthur Foundation, commonly referred to as "genius" grants. Yet her only play to receive a professional production in L.A. was an early work, "Imperceptible Mutabilities in the Third Kingdom," staged at the 99-seat Odyssey Theatre in West L.A. in 1993.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2008 | Diane Haithman
It looks like the Big Orange is soon to lose another playwright to the Big Apple. Suzan-Lori Parks, the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright ("Topdog/Underdog"), has been awarded the first Master Writer Chair at the Public Theater in New York City. Funded by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the full-salaried post affords the chosen writer the chance to develop his or her work using the resources of the Public Theater and to participate in "the artistic life of the theater."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2005 | Lynne Heffley
Producers of the Oscar-winning film "Ray" have tapped Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Suzan-Lori Parks for their Ray Charles stage project. Parks, who won the Pulitzer for her 2002 Broadway play, "Topdog/Underdog," was first choice to pen the stage version of Charles' life and music, according to Stuart Benjamin of Benjamin Productions and Howard and Karen Baldwin of Baldwin Entertainment Group. "She's a brilliant writer," Benjamin said Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2006
YOUR piece describes a small but still troubling step in the decline of Western Civilization ["A Steady Diet of Plot Luck," July 23]. Untold theater companies around the country, including a number locally, are falling over themselves to mount productions of what amounts to Suzan-Lori Parks' daily musings, simply because she has stature. She is a MacArthur "genius" and a Pulitzer winner for the incoherent, pointless exercise that is "Top Dog/Underdog." She puts on paper anything that comes into her mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2007 | Lea Lion
The last time I saw Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Suzan-Lori Parks, a security guard was hassling her for climbing up on a concrete planter at the Music Center Plaza. We were at the Los Angeles premiere of her yearlong national theater festival "365 Days/365 Plays" and Parks was trying to get a better view of the action. Unfazed by the warning, the dreadlocked playwright flashed the guard a wide smile and jumped down into the crowd. Life is no less exciting for Parks this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2006 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Inside the Ahmanson Theatre and Mark Taper Forum on Wednesday night, the usual actors performed the usual theatrics for the usual audiences, with comfortable seats and high production values for all. Outside was another story. Ten plays were promised. Free. In an hour. Part of what might be the largest American theater collaboration ever. What? "Look at the people!" said a beaming woman, who wore dreadlocks and a black leather jacket and glided up the stairs like the belle of a postmodern ball.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2006 | Lynne Heffley
Fairy tales and urban tales, homecoming stories, observations of life and death, tragedy and comedy: There's something for everyone in "365 Days/365 Plays," reportedly American theater's largest collaborative venture, conceived and produced by Pulitzer Prize winner Suzan-Lori Parks ("Topdog/Underdog") and Bonnie Metzgar, associate artistic director of Curious Theatre Company in Denver.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2006
YOUR piece describes a small but still troubling step in the decline of Western Civilization ["A Steady Diet of Plot Luck," July 23]. Untold theater companies around the country, including a number locally, are falling over themselves to mount productions of what amounts to Suzan-Lori Parks' daily musings, simply because she has stature. She is a MacArthur "genius" and a Pulitzer winner for the incoherent, pointless exercise that is "Top Dog/Underdog." She puts on paper anything that comes into her mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2006 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
IF Suzan-Lori Parks and Bonnie Metzgar could sell Chevys the way they're selling plays -- without a test drive, without even a peek under the hood -- they'd be rescuing General Motors instead of Pied Pipering several hundred American theater companies toward destinations unknown. Parks is the livewire MacArthur "genius" grantee and Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright of "Topdog/Underdog." Metzgar, her low-key friend of 20 years, is producer, artistic confidante and, for this mission, her prod.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2006 | Mike Boehm
Oprah may know how to get the whole country reading the same book, but Pulitzer Prize-winner Suzan-Lori Parks has come up with a way to get it performing the same plays, week after week, for an entire year. From Nov. 13, 2002, to Nov. 12, 2003, Parks wrote a short play each day. Now comes "365 days/365 plays," conceived and produced by Parks and Bonnie Metzgar. Billed as the largest theatrical collaboration in U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
'The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess' (PS Classics) Gershwin purists, this "Porgy and Bess" is probably not for you, even though its official title is "The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess. " The cast album of the current Broadway production is a streamlined version of a score that can run longer than three hours when done in its entirety. This two-disc recording is not just shorter, but it also takes liberties that have rankled traditionalists. "Summertime" is performed as a romantic duet; sections of recitative have been converted to spoken dialogue; and the orchestra has been scaled down for a Broadway house.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2006 | Lynne Heffley
Fairy tales and urban tales, homecoming stories, observations of life and death, tragedy and comedy: There's something for everyone in "365 Days/365 Plays," reportedly American theater's largest collaborative venture, conceived and produced by Pulitzer Prize winner Suzan-Lori Parks ("Topdog/Underdog") and Bonnie Metzgar, associate artistic director of Curious Theatre Company in Denver.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2005 | Lynne Heffley
Producers of the Oscar-winning film "Ray" have tapped Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Suzan-Lori Parks for their Ray Charles stage project. Parks, who won the Pulitzer for her 2002 Broadway play, "Topdog/Underdog," was first choice to pen the stage version of Charles' life and music, according to Stuart Benjamin of Benjamin Productions and Howard and Karen Baldwin of Baldwin Entertainment Group. "She's a brilliant writer," Benjamin said Tuesday.
BOOKS
June 1, 2003 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review.
It's 1963. News of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and the Freedom Riders has begun to percolate into West Texas, and even the odd cop has begun to think defensively: "I can hear the people up in New York and Chicago and Warshington and Hollywood. I can hear them talking. Calling me a white supremacist." But little has actually changed. In the words of Roosevelt Beede, a former preacher who runs a gas station, "Negro life is cheap....
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