Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSuzanne Farrell
IN THE NEWS

Suzanne Farrell

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1988 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Just beneath the pale softness of her Botticelli face some vague hint of trepidation shows as Suzanne Farrell floats into the lobby of the Chateau Marmont. Her uneasiness, masked perhaps by the calm and quietude that surrounds the hotel, is almost palpable. But nothing is different. Farrell has always made her aura palpable.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2011 | By Victoria Looseleaf, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In 1957, George Balanchine, co-founder and artistic director of New York City Ballet, revived his "Apollo," first created in 1928 for the Ballets Russes with an original score by Igor Stravinsky. The choreographer had summed up the piece as "a wild, untamed youth learns nobility through art. " That description could easily apply to dancer Jacques d'Amboise, who joined City Ballet at 15, was cast as Apollo eight years later and had 24 roles made for him during his three-plus decades with the troupe.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1989 | ROBERT GRESKOVIC
George Balanchine could not have known in 1977, when he sent Suzanne Farrell out alone onto the vast New York State Theater stage to climax his "Vienna Waltzes" that he had fashioned an ideal farewell showcase for his chief muse and favored ballerina. But that artistic upshot became potently evident Sunday when 44-year-old Farrell, who underwent hip-replacement surgery in 1987, danced her farewell performance with New York City Ballet.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2003 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
In the 20 years since the death of George Balanchine, his unprecedented choreographic legacy has been compromised by inevitable stylistic drift and the contradictory agendas of different artistic directors. For instance, the Kirov Ballet (the company that trained him) tries to dance Balanchine as if he never left Russia, while New York City Ballet (the company he co-founded) currently enforces a hard-driven 21st century efficiency in his works.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1997 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
At once startling in its revelations about the ballet world and compassionate in its view of human frailty, the documentary "Suzanne Farrell: Elusive Muse" comes to the PBS "Dance in America" series on Wednesday, in a version 30 minutes shorter than the one nominated for an Academy Award this year. Directed by Anne Belle and Deborah Dickson, the 90-minute telecast extends and deepens the oral history of New York City Ballet presented in Belle's superb "Dancing for Mr. B.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1991 | DONNA PERLMUTTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two-and-a-half years ago, Suzanne Farrell was poised at a critical crossroad: to try to dance, following hip-replacement surgery, or to give it up. That dilemma resolved itself when the celebrated high-stepper found there would be no miracle cure. But she promised, back then, regardless of how her situation worked out, to write a book "setting the record straight" about herself and George Balanchine, whose maxim "Ballet is Woman" she epitomized.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2003 | Susan Reiter, Special to The Times
Suzanne FARRELL is in a rehearsal studio, a setting she has been intimately familiar with for more than 40 years. She is working on a ballet by George Balanchine, a process that has also been part of the fabric of her being since the early '60s. Back then, Farrell was on her way to becoming Balanchine's favored muse -- a unique, mold-breaking interpreter of his choreography who bonded with him in an artistic union that galvanized the ballet world and led to the creation of enduring masterworks.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1997
It was with great disappointment that I read in "Dances With Balanchine--a Muse's Tale" (June 24) quotations from PBS' "Great Performances" executive producer Jac Venza regarding the "Suzanne Farrell: Elusive Muse" program. He was quoted as saying that the program was shortened from 115 minutes to only 84 minutes because "the subject deserves no more than 90 minutes. Frankly, I don't see that anything will be lost to the broad audience." He further states that "station managers feel that very few things in the world are worth ruining their whole evening's schedule."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1986
Suzanne Farrell, a principal dancer with New York City Ballet since 1965, has announced her intention to retire from dancing at the end of the winter season. Although Farrell's decision was prompted by a recurring hip injury--which forced the ballerina to cancel her recent scheduled performances at the Orange County Music Center--she said in New York Monday that she expects to dance a number of roles in the NYCB Lincoln Center season, Nov. 18-Feb. 22.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1986
Because ballerina Suzanne Farrell is suffering from what a company spokeswoman called "a recurring hip injury," two changes in the repertory of New York City Ballet, scheduled to open a five-day engagement in Segerstrom Hall at the new Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa tonight, have been announced. On the program tonight, "Tzigane" will not be performed; it will be replaced by "Eight More" (Martins/Stravinsky), to be danced by Peter Boal, Michael Byars and Gen Horiuchi.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2003 | Susan Reiter, Special to The Times
Suzanne FARRELL is in a rehearsal studio, a setting she has been intimately familiar with for more than 40 years. She is working on a ballet by George Balanchine, a process that has also been part of the fabric of her being since the early '60s. Back then, Farrell was on her way to becoming Balanchine's favored muse -- a unique, mold-breaking interpreter of his choreography who bonded with him in an artistic union that galvanized the ballet world and led to the creation of enduring masterworks.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2000 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
"This has all been a nice surprise," Suzanne Farrell says with a laugh, reflecting on the 11-year transition from her career as star dancer with New York City Ballet to her newest role as director of the Suzanne Farrell Ballet, an 18-member ensemble that made its debut Friday at the Kennedy Center as part of the ongoing, multi-company "Balanchine Celebration."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1997
It was with great disappointment that I read in "Dances With Balanchine--a Muse's Tale" (June 24) quotations from PBS' "Great Performances" executive producer Jac Venza regarding the "Suzanne Farrell: Elusive Muse" program. He was quoted as saying that the program was shortened from 115 minutes to only 84 minutes because "the subject deserves no more than 90 minutes. Frankly, I don't see that anything will be lost to the broad audience." He further states that "station managers feel that very few things in the world are worth ruining their whole evening's schedule."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1997 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
At once startling in its revelations about the ballet world and compassionate in its view of human frailty, the documentary "Suzanne Farrell: Elusive Muse" comes to the PBS "Dance in America" series on Wednesday, in a version 30 minutes shorter than the one nominated for an Academy Award this year. Directed by Anne Belle and Deborah Dickson, the 90-minute telecast extends and deepens the oral history of New York City Ballet presented in Belle's superb "Dancing for Mr. B.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1991 | DONNA PERLMUTTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two-and-a-half years ago, Suzanne Farrell was poised at a critical crossroad: to try to dance, following hip-replacement surgery, or to give it up. That dilemma resolved itself when the celebrated high-stepper found there would be no miracle cure. But she promised, back then, regardless of how her situation worked out, to write a book "setting the record straight" about herself and George Balanchine, whose maxim "Ballet is Woman" she epitomized.
BOOKS
September 23, 1990 | Lewis Segal, Segal is The Times' dance writer
Ballerinas Suzanne Farrell and Gelsey Kirkland have more in common than they might suppose. Yes, yes, in the American ballet firmament right now they represent almost mythic opposites, with Farrell always seen as a kind of contemporary White Swan: the chaste, soulful Muse of the great George Balanchine. In contrast, Kirkland invariably is cast as the treacherous, unpredictable Black Swan, deeply dangerous to the status quo. Nevertheless, their new autobiographies bring them uncomfortably close to telling the same story, one that increasingly focuses on the conflict between body and spirit--the hard physical realities of dancing versus the engulfing artistic vision.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2011 | By Victoria Looseleaf, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In 1957, George Balanchine, co-founder and artistic director of New York City Ballet, revived his "Apollo," first created in 1928 for the Ballets Russes with an original score by Igor Stravinsky. The choreographer had summed up the piece as "a wild, untamed youth learns nobility through art. " That description could easily apply to dancer Jacques d'Amboise, who joined City Ballet at 15, was cast as Apollo eight years later and had 24 roles made for him during his three-plus decades with the troupe.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2003 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
In the 20 years since the death of George Balanchine, his unprecedented choreographic legacy has been compromised by inevitable stylistic drift and the contradictory agendas of different artistic directors. For instance, the Kirov Ballet (the company that trained him) tries to dance Balanchine as if he never left Russia, while New York City Ballet (the company he co-founded) currently enforces a hard-driven 21st century efficiency in his works.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1989 | ROBERT GRESKOVIC
George Balanchine could not have known in 1977, when he sent Suzanne Farrell out alone onto the vast New York State Theater stage to climax his "Vienna Waltzes" that he had fashioned an ideal farewell showcase for his chief muse and favored ballerina. But that artistic upshot became potently evident Sunday when 44-year-old Farrell, who underwent hip-replacement surgery in 1987, danced her farewell performance with New York City Ballet.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1988 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Just beneath the pale softness of her Botticelli face some vague hint of trepidation shows as Suzanne Farrell floats into the lobby of the Chateau Marmont. Her uneasiness, masked perhaps by the calm and quietude that surrounds the hotel, is almost palpable. But nothing is different. Farrell has always made her aura palpable.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|