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Suzanne Goin

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FOOD
December 19, 2007 | S. Irene Virbila, Times Staff Writer
AFTER the din of the restaurant last night, Lucques is heaven. No raucous birthday parties or pounding heavy-metal soundtrack. No standing around waiting for our table, whacked by passing monolithic handbags. I don't have to fight my way in or worry that the reservation desk has lost our reservation. I don't have to wonder whether the chef is in or not, because either way the food is consistently delightful and original.
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NEWS
January 15, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
The fourth restaurant in the gourmet Tavern family created by chef Suzanne Goin and business partner Caroline Styne has opened at the newly upgraded Tom Bradley International Terminal at Los Angeles International Airport. The Larder at Tavern in the post-security screening area of the terminal brings freshly baked breads and an open kitchen where diners can watch hot sandwiches and other dishes being made. Travelers may eat in or choose a "picnic box" (to-go meal) featuring items such as Nicoise Spanish tuna with olives, cucumber, tomato and aioli; and a vegan cobb salad with beets, avocado and sugar snap peas.
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FOOD
June 1, 2013 | JONATHAN GOLD, RESTAURANT CRITIC
When the first AOC opened a decade ago, nobody quite knew what to make of the place, a wine bar near the original Farmers Market that seemed to specialize in cured meats, salads and lots of tiny dishes that reflected the flavors of coastal Italy and Provence, but also Spain and North Africa. We were younger then, and as much as we respected chef Suzanne Goin, who was moonlighting from her restaurant Lucques, neither harissa nor the herby marinade chermoula were quite in our vocabularies yet. Plus this was the dawn of the small-plates thing, so nobody was quite sure what to order; whether the cheeses were supposed to come after dinner or as part of dinner; whether we were each supposed to order our own plate of bacon-wrapped dates or to surrender a communal order to the table.
FOOD
June 1, 2013 | JONATHAN GOLD, RESTAURANT CRITIC
When the first AOC opened a decade ago, nobody quite knew what to make of the place, a wine bar near the original Farmers Market that seemed to specialize in cured meats, salads and lots of tiny dishes that reflected the flavors of coastal Italy and Provence, but also Spain and North Africa. We were younger then, and as much as we respected chef Suzanne Goin, who was moonlighting from her restaurant Lucques, neither harissa nor the herby marinade chermoula were quite in our vocabularies yet. Plus this was the dawn of the small-plates thing, so nobody was quite sure what to order; whether the cheeses were supposed to come after dinner or as part of dinner; whether we were each supposed to order our own plate of bacon-wrapped dates or to surrender a communal order to the table.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1999
Suzanne Goin Chef, co-owner of Lucques, 32 What she's done: Goin, who worked at Campanile for two years, the second as executive chef, just opened her own restaurant with partner Caroline Styne. She began her career in L.A. while in high school as an apprentice pastry chef at Ma Maison. She has worked in kitchens as diverse as the rustic Italian Il Forno in Providence, R.I., and at the Mediterranean Olives in Boston.
FOOD
May 11, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times
On these beautiful, lazy mornings of late spring, brunch beckons like the promised land. Bring a couple of good friends (or your mom), sit in the sunshine and catch up over a relaxed meal. We're not talking giant buffets but carefully prepared, seasonal dishes. I don't indulge often, but whenever I do, I leave with a feeling of well-being that leaves a glow on the rest of the day. A.O.C. Reserve a table in the romantic garden at A.O.C.'s new digs (the former Orso). Bougainvillea nods over the garden wall.
NEWS
May 12, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
When it comes to dreaming about a perfect Mother's Day, Los Angeles' top chefs turn out to be just like working moms everywhere -- sleep and perfectly behaved children are at the top of the list. Suzanne Goin is chef and owner at Lucques, AOC, Tavern and the Larders at the Tavern and on Burton Way. Married to Hungry Cat chef David Lentz, Goin has three kids - 4 1/2-year-old Charles and 6-year-old twins, Alexandra and Jack. What does she want for Mother's Day? Goin summed it up succinctly by email: “Sleep in, big breakfast, nap, massage, play with kids, dinner with David, sleep (did I mention sleep?
NEWS
March 29, 2013 | By Caitlin Keller
Chefs Alice Waters and Suzanne Goin are pairing up to host “Lunch Matters,” a fundraiser to revamp the lunch program at the Larchmont Charter School in West Hollywood on April 21. The event will raise funds to rebuild a kitchen where the school's lunches will be made using seasonal produce from the school garden and local farms. The lunches will be incorporated into the curriculum to complement nutrition and cooking classes as part of the Larchmont Charter School's Edible Schoolyard program.
NEWS
January 15, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
The fourth restaurant in the gourmet Tavern family created by chef Suzanne Goin and business partner Caroline Styne has opened at the newly upgraded Tom Bradley International Terminal at Los Angeles International Airport. The Larder at Tavern in the post-security screening area of the terminal brings freshly baked breads and an open kitchen where diners can watch hot sandwiches and other dishes being made. Travelers may eat in or choose a "picnic box" (to-go meal) featuring items such as Nicoise Spanish tuna with olives, cucumber, tomato and aioli; and a vegan cobb salad with beets, avocado and sugar snap peas.
FOOD
July 29, 2009 | S. IRENE VIRBILA, RESTAURANT CRITIC
What if no one had introduced Caroline Styne, then manager of Jones, to Suzanne Goin, who was at the time chef de cuisine at Campanile? We wouldn't have Lucques or A.O.C., two of L.A.'s most beloved restaurants. And we certainly wouldn't have the partners' new Tavern in Brentwood. Styne and Goin are the food world's equivalent of Lerner and Loewe or Leiber and Stoller. Everything they do just seems to work effortlessly. The two share a certain sensibility and aesthetic.
NEWS
May 12, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
When it comes to dreaming about a perfect Mother's Day, Los Angeles' top chefs turn out to be just like working moms everywhere -- sleep and perfectly behaved children are at the top of the list. Suzanne Goin is chef and owner at Lucques, AOC, Tavern and the Larders at the Tavern and on Burton Way. Married to Hungry Cat chef David Lentz, Goin has three kids - 4 1/2-year-old Charles and 6-year-old twins, Alexandra and Jack. What does she want for Mother's Day? Goin summed it up succinctly by email: “Sleep in, big breakfast, nap, massage, play with kids, dinner with David, sleep (did I mention sleep?
FOOD
May 11, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times
On these beautiful, lazy mornings of late spring, brunch beckons like the promised land. Bring a couple of good friends (or your mom), sit in the sunshine and catch up over a relaxed meal. We're not talking giant buffets but carefully prepared, seasonal dishes. I don't indulge often, but whenever I do, I leave with a feeling of well-being that leaves a glow on the rest of the day. A.O.C. Reserve a table in the romantic garden at A.O.C.'s new digs (the former Orso). Bougainvillea nods over the garden wall.
NEWS
March 29, 2013 | By Caitlin Keller
Chefs Alice Waters and Suzanne Goin are pairing up to host “Lunch Matters,” a fundraiser to revamp the lunch program at the Larchmont Charter School in West Hollywood on April 21. The event will raise funds to rebuild a kitchen where the school's lunches will be made using seasonal produce from the school garden and local farms. The lunches will be incorporated into the curriculum to complement nutrition and cooking classes as part of the Larchmont Charter School's Edible Schoolyard program.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2011
Here's what the stars at the 17th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards will be eating inside the Shrine Auditorium on Sunday night while you ? possibly with lukewarm TV dinner in hand ? watch them congratulate one another: A crisp salad of nutty arugula, chewy dates, plump blood oranges and paper-thin Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese kissed with olive oil and sprinkled with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper; fat beluga lentils with soft chunks of carrot, pine nuts and a dusting of creamy feta cheese; slender slices of slow-roasted king salmon on a sea of diced cucumbers in a yogurt sauce flavored with ginger-mint chutney; tender slow-roasted lamb on a creamy bed of pureed chickpeas flecked with black olives and tangy feta salsa verde; and a slim herbed crostini baked with parsley, rosemary and thyme.
FOOD
March 25, 2010
The 2010 James Beard Foundation Award nominations announced Monday virtually ignored the Southern California food scene. Out of 55 categories, local writers and chefs got just a few nominations, led by best chef nominee Suzanne Goin of Lucques and Tavern. Providence's Michael Cimarusti and Mozza's Matt Molina were nominated for best chef in the Pacific region. In the journalism awards, Los Angeles magazine's Patric Kuh and the LA Weekly's Jonathan Gold received nominations. And "Love Soup," a cookbook by Ojai's Anna Thomas, was nominated in the Healthy Focus category.
FOOD
July 29, 2009 | S. IRENE VIRBILA, RESTAURANT CRITIC
What if no one had introduced Caroline Styne, then manager of Jones, to Suzanne Goin, who was at the time chef de cuisine at Campanile? We wouldn't have Lucques or A.O.C., two of L.A.'s most beloved restaurants. And we certainly wouldn't have the partners' new Tavern in Brentwood. Styne and Goin are the food world's equivalent of Lerner and Loewe or Leiber and Stoller. Everything they do just seems to work effortlessly. The two share a certain sensibility and aesthetic.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2011
Here's what the stars at the 17th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards will be eating inside the Shrine Auditorium on Sunday night while you ? possibly with lukewarm TV dinner in hand ? watch them congratulate one another: A crisp salad of nutty arugula, chewy dates, plump blood oranges and paper-thin Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese kissed with olive oil and sprinkled with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper; fat beluga lentils with soft chunks of carrot, pine nuts and a dusting of creamy feta cheese; slender slices of slow-roasted king salmon on a sea of diced cucumbers in a yogurt sauce flavored with ginger-mint chutney; tender slow-roasted lamb on a creamy bed of pureed chickpeas flecked with black olives and tangy feta salsa verde; and a slim herbed crostini baked with parsley, rosemary and thyme.
MAGAZINE
March 13, 2005 | DAVID LEITE
Call Suzanne Goin the vegetable whisperer. The executive chef of Lucques in West Hollywood claims to walk through farmers' markets, past rows of arugula and bins of artichokes, divining information that is beyond the ears of mere mortals. Each vegetable, she explains, speaks to her, telling her what it wants her to do with it. It would be tempting to dismiss Goin as just another eccentric chef, if it weren't for the sublime and utterly original things she coaxes out of such chatty produce.
FOOD
March 25, 2009 | Russ Parsons
When Lucques and AOC chef Suzanne Goin got the news that Los Angeles landmark Cook's Library was going to close, she sounded close to tears. "Noooo," she said, "that's the most horrible thing I've heard. Oh my God, the world is coming to an end." If that sounds a little over the top, you've probably never been to Cook's Library. The nearly 20-year-old shop on West 3rd Street near the Beverly Center is one of the few stores in the United States devoted strictly to cookbooks.
FOOD
December 19, 2007 | S. Irene Virbila, Times Staff Writer
AFTER the din of the restaurant last night, Lucques is heaven. No raucous birthday parties or pounding heavy-metal soundtrack. No standing around waiting for our table, whacked by passing monolithic handbags. I don't have to fight my way in or worry that the reservation desk has lost our reservation. I don't have to wonder whether the chef is in or not, because either way the food is consistently delightful and original.
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