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Suzanne Lacy

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October 1, 1989 | JANICE ROSS
All artists like to think of themselves as pushing boundaries, but few have done it on as grand, public or literal a scale as performance artist Suzanne Lacy. A 43-year-old native of Wasco, Calif., Lacy has been admiringly referred to as a "social reformer and witch" by art historian Moria Roth. When word of her newest project leaks out, however, the phrase "artful politician" may well be added to that title.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | By David Ng
"Three Weeks in May," the famous 1977 work by artist-activist Suzanne Lacy that mapped rape cases across Southern California, will now have a permanent home at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. The Hammer said Wednesday it has acquired the piece, which Lacy created with artist Leslie Labowitz over a three-week period in 1977 near L.A.'s City Hall. The museum said the piece was purchased through its acquisition fund. Lacy created "Three Weeks in May" to raise awareness of rape cases.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1996 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Whatever else "Sexual Politics: Judy Chicago's 'Dinner Party' in Feminist Art History" is--including an occasion for assessing feminism's legacy and reuniting Chicago's collaborators--the exhibition at the UCLA/Hammer Museum is also an opportunity to catch up with feminist artists who emerged in the socially conscious 1970s but faded from view in the profligate 1980s.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2012 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
You can never step in the same river twice, unless you're a performance artist working today. Artists who specialize in the most ephemeral, fleeting and hard-to-preserve visual art form are increasingly trying various ways to resurrect their earlier pieces and bring them to new audiences. And the 11-day Performance and Public Art Festival that starts Thursday in Los Angeles will be a big test of how effective their work can be when brought back to life in a different era. Funded primarily by the Getty as part of Pacific Standard Time — the museum-wide celebration of Southern California art history that started in October and runs into spring — the festival will revisit several memorable works done in the L.A. area in the late 1960s and '70s.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2012 | Jori Finkel
Standing outside the Los Angeles Police Department's headquarters earlier this week, Suzanne Lacy had a camera around her neck and a red marker in hand. The artist had taped two printouts of the word "rape" onto one section of a 28-foot-long map of Los Angeles and was puzzling over the question. How big should the letters in "rape" be? Lacy was getting ready to launch a multifaceted anti-rape project called "Three Weeks in January," after her influential 1977 project, "Three Weeks in May," for which she installed a map of L.A. in a downtown mall.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | By David Ng
"Three Weeks in May," the famous 1977 work by artist-activist Suzanne Lacy that mapped rape cases across Southern California, will now have a permanent home at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. The Hammer said Wednesday it has acquired the piece, which Lacy created with artist Leslie Labowitz over a three-week period in 1977 near L.A.'s City Hall. The museum said the piece was purchased through its acquisition fund. Lacy created "Three Weeks in May" to raise awareness of rape cases.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2012 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
You can never step in the same river twice, unless you're a performance artist working today. Artists who specialize in the most ephemeral, fleeting and hard-to-preserve visual art form are increasingly trying various ways to resurrect their earlier pieces and bring them to new audiences. And the 11-day Performance and Public Art Festival that starts Thursday in Los Angeles will be a big test of how effective their work can be when brought back to life in a different era. Funded primarily by the Getty as part of Pacific Standard Time — the museum-wide celebration of Southern California art history that started in October and runs into spring — the festival will revisit several memorable works done in the L.A. area in the late 1960s and '70s.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2007 | Suzanne Muchnic
ARTSCENE, the ever-present guide to Southern California galleries and museums, is celebrating its 25th birthday Wednesday night with food, drink, art talk, performances and recognition of L.A.-based talent. The Los Angeles County Museum of Art will provide a venue for ArtScene: 25, The Los Angeles Art Awards, but it is not sponsoring the event.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1992 | SHAUNA SNOW
The California Afro-American Museum in Exposition Park and the Long Beach Museum of Art are among 10 nationwide recipients of the first batch of grants from "AT&T New Art/New Visions," a fledgling corporate program that provides challenge grants for museum exhibitions of new work by living artists, especially works by women and artists of color.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1993 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Amazing Decade: Women and Performance Art in America, 1970-1980," an exhibition originally curated in 1980 and published as a book three years later, has been restaged at the 18th Street Arts Complex. Part rejoinder and part companion to Turner/Krull Gallery's recent "Action/Performance and the Photograph," this important show reminds us that while Vito Acconci was making art by masturbating, Chris Burden being shot and Dennis Oppenheim orchestrating a sunburn, Faith Wilding was waiting.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2012 | Jori Finkel
Standing outside the Los Angeles Police Department's headquarters earlier this week, Suzanne Lacy had a camera around her neck and a red marker in hand. The artist had taped two printouts of the word "rape" onto one section of a 28-foot-long map of Los Angeles and was puzzling over the question. How big should the letters in "rape" be? Lacy was getting ready to launch a multifaceted anti-rape project called "Three Weeks in January," after her influential 1977 project, "Three Weeks in May," for which she installed a map of L.A. in a downtown mall.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1996 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Whatever else "Sexual Politics: Judy Chicago's 'Dinner Party' in Feminist Art History" is--including an occasion for assessing feminism's legacy and reuniting Chicago's collaborators--the exhibition at the UCLA/Hammer Museum is also an opportunity to catch up with feminist artists who emerged in the socially conscious 1970s but faded from view in the profligate 1980s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1989 | JANICE ROSS
All artists like to think of themselves as pushing boundaries, but few have done it on as grand, public or literal a scale as performance artist Suzanne Lacy. A 43-year-old native of Wasco, Calif., Lacy has been admiringly referred to as a "social reformer and witch" by art historian Moria Roth. When word of her newest project leaks out, however, the phrase "artful politician" may well be added to that title.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1992 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Walt Disney Co. and several prominent benefactors have pledged $30 million to California Institute of the Arts for student scholarships and renovation of the small but nationally respected campus in Valencia. CalArts is using these pledges to begin a $60-million fund-raising campaign, school officials announced Monday at a press conference at the City Club in downtown's Wells Fargo Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2008 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
Los Angeles has long been known as one of the best places on Earth to be an artist just getting started. Affordable rent, plentiful exhibition opportunities and collectors on the lookout for inexpensive art -- which just might be the next big thing -- make for a scene filled with possibilities.
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