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Suzanne Lummis

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BOOKS
May 16, 1993
Whole neighborhoods will begin traveling like lemmings, mine first. Meanwhile, I go through this city achieving, at some cost, these poems. I've done what they say I've done or else I invented it, which was almost as taxing. So at night when the house settles I half fly out of bed, then lie awake reasoning with the earth: I'm too old to die! If it was going to happen at all it should have been years ago, before all this started. From "Idiosyncrasies" (Red Wind Books: $8; 65 pp.).
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BOOKS
April 19, 1998
River noise replacements have appeared. Massive rumble of the freeway in the afternoon. Truck going down through its gears. Helicopter cutting a circle. Across the street the black-and-white dotted dog some call Daisy or Droopy or Bonnie looks like a cow grazing on the steep lawn. That's where the peahens stood so still the day one of them walked in front of a car. Her wings hushed in air and whacked on the pavement and a thick red river of blood pooled like red tar on the asphalt.
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BOOKS
March 31, 1991
Carolyn See's survey of the recent week-long L.A. Poetry Festival (Feb. 24) was a long-overdue acknowledgement of the rich and varied group of contemporary poets who write in and of Los Angeles. As one who has felt blitzed over the years by the incessant message that culture in America is something that happens only on the East Coast, I have enjoyed unlearning that myth in the process of discovering the work of Southland poets. I was, however, disappointed to note that the author overlooked two accomplished local poets who were also instrumental in organizing the Festival: Suzanne Lummis and Charles Webb.
BOOKS
October 19, 1997 | ROBERT DASSANOWSKY, Robert Dassanowsky is director of film and German studies at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs. He is the author of "Phantom Empires: The Novels of Alexander Lernet-Holenia" and "Verses of a Marriage." A somewhat different version of this essay also appeared in the July/August issue of American Book Review
The general notion of poetry from Los Angeles at the end of our century is a curious one indeed. Beyond the often cited post-punk finger-snappers of Chicago; the Village loft-gruff of New York; the regional, intellectual or sexual contexts of Denver, Boston, San Francisco or Seattle, the Los Angeles poetry world, unlike the dominant art industry of the city, has no easy stereotype.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1990
It's always gratifying to see media coverage on the live poetry phenomenon, and each story helps inform readers and gives support to the region's poets. Because poets do get so little attention, however, it's all the more important that the journalist not misrepresent any details. In Rose Apodaca's recent article ("Readings, Writings and Libations," Nov. 15, OC LIVE!), I suspect she proposed an article about Performance Poetry, then felt obliged to slip pegs of various sizes through a single hole.
BOOKS
April 19, 1998
River noise replacements have appeared. Massive rumble of the freeway in the afternoon. Truck going down through its gears. Helicopter cutting a circle. Across the street the black-and-white dotted dog some call Daisy or Droopy or Bonnie looks like a cow grazing on the steep lawn. That's where the peahens stood so still the day one of them walked in front of a car. Her wings hushed in air and whacked on the pavement and a thick red river of blood pooled like red tar on the asphalt.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1987 | DON SHIRLEY
Suzanne Lummis was writing a play about three middle-class couples, but she didn't want it to be "just another play about relationships." Too many playwrights "expect me to wrack my heart over their teeny-tiny characters and their dinky problems," Lummis said. "I resist." She wanted her play to touch on a theme that was "larger than these people, that went beyond their living room." The theme she selected--the creation of the world and what humanity has accomplished since--certainly isn't dinky.
NEWS
May 10, 1996 | ERIN J. AUBRY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If Webster's ever put a picture next to its definition of the word "poet," it would likely be one of Suzanne Lummis: slight, almost bird-like, dark hair wisping from beneath a habitual beret, blue eyes framed by large glasses that tend to slide to the end of her nose and perch there precariously, unnoticed, as she reels off the most sublime images of this poem or that.
BOOKS
October 19, 1997 | ROBERT DASSANOWSKY, Robert Dassanowsky is director of film and German studies at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs. He is the author of "Phantom Empires: The Novels of Alexander Lernet-Holenia" and "Verses of a Marriage." A somewhat different version of this essay also appeared in the July/August issue of American Book Review
The general notion of poetry from Los Angeles at the end of our century is a curious one indeed. Beyond the often cited post-punk finger-snappers of Chicago; the Village loft-gruff of New York; the regional, intellectual or sexual contexts of Denver, Boston, San Francisco or Seattle, the Los Angeles poetry world, unlike the dominant art industry of the city, has no easy stereotype.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2007
GORE pornographer and hypocrite Eli Roth blames the appetite for his money-making celebrations of sadism on the war's carnage and Abu Ghraib ("A Queasy-Does-It Guy," June 3). And all the while he both feeds and feeds off of the same impulses that resulted in the Abu Ghraib terrors, the same impulses that drive insurgents who kidnap soldiers, then dump their tortured bodies where they can be found by their comrades. He's not really a product of our times -- jackals like this have been around forever.
NEWS
May 10, 1996 | ERIN J. AUBRY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If Webster's ever put a picture next to its definition of the word "poet," it would likely be one of Suzanne Lummis: slight, almost bird-like, dark hair wisping from beneath a habitual beret, blue eyes framed by large glasses that tend to slide to the end of her nose and perch there precariously, unnoticed, as she reels off the most sublime images of this poem or that.
BOOKS
May 16, 1993
Whole neighborhoods will begin traveling like lemmings, mine first. Meanwhile, I go through this city achieving, at some cost, these poems. I've done what they say I've done or else I invented it, which was almost as taxing. So at night when the house settles I half fly out of bed, then lie awake reasoning with the earth: I'm too old to die! If it was going to happen at all it should have been years ago, before all this started. From "Idiosyncrasies" (Red Wind Books: $8; 65 pp.).
BOOKS
March 31, 1991
Carolyn See's survey of the recent week-long L.A. Poetry Festival (Feb. 24) was a long-overdue acknowledgement of the rich and varied group of contemporary poets who write in and of Los Angeles. As one who has felt blitzed over the years by the incessant message that culture in America is something that happens only on the East Coast, I have enjoyed unlearning that myth in the process of discovering the work of Southland poets. I was, however, disappointed to note that the author overlooked two accomplished local poets who were also instrumental in organizing the Festival: Suzanne Lummis and Charles Webb.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1990
It's always gratifying to see media coverage on the live poetry phenomenon, and each story helps inform readers and gives support to the region's poets. Because poets do get so little attention, however, it's all the more important that the journalist not misrepresent any details. In Rose Apodaca's recent article ("Readings, Writings and Libations," Nov. 15, OC LIVE!), I suspect she proposed an article about Performance Poetry, then felt obliged to slip pegs of various sizes through a single hole.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1987 | DON SHIRLEY
Suzanne Lummis was writing a play about three middle-class couples, but she didn't want it to be "just another play about relationships." Too many playwrights "expect me to wrack my heart over their teeny-tiny characters and their dinky problems," Lummis said. "I resist." She wanted her play to touch on a theme that was "larger than these people, that went beyond their living room." The theme she selected--the creation of the world and what humanity has accomplished since--certainly isn't dinky.
NEWS
October 23, 1992 | GARY LIBMAN
If you love poetry--and even if you don't--the Los Angeles Poetry Festival that begins Sunday is for you. It's designed to appeal to everyone, including those who think Shelley is the first name of a comedian who starred on "Cheers." "If they're introduced to poetry the right way, they'll love it," says festival director Suzanne Lummis. "The poetry is presented with a verve and joy for the art. People in the festival love the written word and love to perform. This is all live.
BOOKS
June 18, 1995
My Aunt Louise subscribed to Photoplay, wrote fan letters, and kept a movie star scrapbook for so long that she began to hallucinate. Boldface lie, my father said, but I believed my Aunt Louise's story that the movie star Richard Egan had fallen head-over-heels in love with her, drove all the way from Hollywood to Colton, California to meet her on Saturday afternoons at the chili dog stand on Mt. Vernon Boulevard.
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