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Suzanne Muchnic

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2009
The Claremont City Council has given the financially troubled Claremont Museum of Art a grant of $18,879 to keep its doors open through the end of the year. The museum recently laid off its full-time staff after three expected donations failed to materialize, but the galleries have remained open. A plan to raise funds and operate the institution at a reduced cost is in the works. -- Suzanne Muchnic
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2009
The Claremont City Council has given the financially troubled Claremont Museum of Art a grant of $18,879 to keep its doors open through the end of the year. The museum recently laid off its full-time staff after three expected donations failed to materialize, but the galleries have remained open. A plan to raise funds and operate the institution at a reduced cost is in the works. -- Suzanne Muchnic
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2009 | Suzanne Muchnic
Lynn Zelevansky, who has become one of the world's leading curators of contemporary art during her 14-year tenure at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, has been appointed director of the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh. She will assume her new position July 15, succeeding Richard Armstrong, who departed last year and now heads the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation in New York. -- Suzanne Muchnic
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2009 | Suzanne Muchnic
Two and a half years after bursting into life in a historic, former fruit packing plant, the Claremont Museum of Art is on death's door, the victim of a financial shortfall. Three expected donations suddenly failed to materialize, leaving the institution without enough money to support itself, said board president Frank Chabre. The museum's five full-time employees, including director William Moreno, have been laid off and the shop closed. The current exhibition, "Ten Pound Ape: Your Mother was Beautiful Once, part vier," will continue for two weeks -- or longer if funds are found, Chabre said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2003
The solution to the uncertain future of the Barnes Museum ["How He Saw the World," by Suzanne Muchnic, Dec. 12] seems simple and sensible enough. Like the Old Testament's King Solomon, it's time to cleave the celebrated collection. By relocating a majority of the Barnes' 9,000-plus works to a modern facility in nearby downtown Philadelphia, the ailing foundation quickly gets out from under its bankruptcy, ensuring its survival without having to sell off any artworks. And why not retain a smaller, curated selection at the Barnes' current, cluttered suburban estate?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1996
Since the articles ran back to back June 9, I suggest you introduce the Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund to Duane H. King of the Southwest Museum and put them face to face. It would appear to be a mutual admiration society in the making, since the fund helps art museums use their permanent collections to attract new audiences ("$11.3 Million . . . Digest That," by Jan Breslauer) and the Southwest Museum is struggling to recapture audiences ("Hidden Treasure," by Suzanne Muchnic). CAROLE KOLLA La Can~ada
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic
Continuing an unusual tradition of including artists in its governance, L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art has elected conceptualist Barbara Kruger to its board of trustees. Kruger, a professor at UCLA, will join artists John Baldessari and Edward Ruscha, appointed a few years ago, and three other new members: Christopher V. Walker, a financial executive who founded Meridian Pacific Capital Partners and recently ended a 10-year tenure on the board at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Charles S. Cohen, a real estate developer; and Maurice Marciano, a fashion designer and co-founder of Guess Inc. MOCA also has announced the acquisition of 130 artworks purchased, donated or promised in 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic
Maria Arena Bell, a television writer and arts advocate, and Pierre Norman Rolin, a philanthropist and global real estate mogul, have joined the board of trustees at L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art. Bell, a native Californian who is head writer for "The Young and the Restless," has a high profile in the nonprofit world as a supporter of arts organizations nationwide. At MOCA, she has led the acquisition and collection committee since 2004, and she chaired the museum's gala for its Takashi Murakami exhibition in 2007.
NEWS
December 7, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic, Deborah Bonello and Jeffrey Fleishman
The Norton Simon Museum recently unveiled a luminous painting by Dutch artist Johannes Vermeer, on loan from the National Gallery of Art in Washington, as part of a bicoastal art exchange. "A Lady Writing," one of only 35 Vermeers known to have survived, will remain on view in Pasadena through Feb. 2. But the museum is already looking forward to its first loan from another East Coast partner. That will be "Comtesse d'Hausonville," a three-quarter-length portrait by French neoclassicist Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres from the Frick Collection in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic
Maria Arena Bell, a television writer and arts advocate, and Pierre Norman Rolin, a philanthropist and global real estate mogul, have joined the board of trustees at L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art. Bell, a native Californian who is head writer for "The Young and the Restless," has a high profile in the nonprofit world as a supporter of arts organizations nationwide. At MOCA, she has led the acquisition and collection committee since 2004, and she chaired the museum's gala for its Takashi Murakami exhibition in 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic
Continuing an unusual tradition of including artists in its governance, L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art has elected conceptualist Barbara Kruger to its board of trustees. Kruger, a professor at UCLA, will join artists John Baldessari and Edward Ruscha, appointed a few years ago, and three other new members: Christopher V. Walker, a financial executive who founded Meridian Pacific Capital Partners and recently ended a 10-year tenure on the board at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Charles S. Cohen, a real estate developer; and Maurice Marciano, a fashion designer and co-founder of Guess Inc. MOCA also has announced the acquisition of 130 artworks purchased, donated or promised in 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2003
The solution to the uncertain future of the Barnes Museum ["How He Saw the World," by Suzanne Muchnic, Dec. 12] seems simple and sensible enough. Like the Old Testament's King Solomon, it's time to cleave the celebrated collection. By relocating a majority of the Barnes' 9,000-plus works to a modern facility in nearby downtown Philadelphia, the ailing foundation quickly gets out from under its bankruptcy, ensuring its survival without having to sell off any artworks. And why not retain a smaller, curated selection at the Barnes' current, cluttered suburban estate?
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