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Suzanne Schiffman

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1988 | GERALD PEARY
Suzanne Schiffman would have been content--"a happy coward"--spending her creative life in the late Francois Truffaut's shadow. As his behind-the-camera collaborator, she had known the masterful French director since she was 17. She contributed to his films for two decades, as script girl, then assistant director, and, from "Day for Night" (1973) through his final picture, "Confidentially Yours" (1983), as his co-screenwriter.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1988 | GERALD PEARY
Suzanne Schiffman would have been content--"a happy coward"--spending her creative life in the late Francois Truffaut's shadow. As his behind-the-camera collaborator, she had known the masterful French director since she was 17. She contributed to his films for two decades, as script girl, then assistant director, and, from "Day for Night" (1973) through his final picture, "Confidentially Yours" (1983), as his co-screenwriter.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
The seductive "Sorceress" (Fine Arts) carries us away to a remote time and place, but its freshness allows us to discover an immediacy relating to ourselves and our concerns. Suzanne Schiffman, Truffaut's longtime collaborator in a stunningly assured directorial debut, and her co-writer, American medieval art historian Pamela Berger, raise timely questions on the role of the church and its oppression of women.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2005 | Susan King
Shoot the Piano Player (Criterion, $40) IT often happens that when directors score both a critical and commercial hit with their debut film, their second outing disappoints. But that wasn't the case with French New Wave director Francois Truffaut. In 1959, Truffaut, then 27, had taken the world by storm with his first feature, the haunting semi-autobiographical drama "The 400 Blows." So the scrutiny was intense when he released "Shoot the Piano Player" in 1960.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1993 | BARBARA SALTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Francois Truffaut burst upon the Cannes Film Festival with his first feature in 1959, he did more than capture the director's prize. With "The 400 Blows," the 27-year-old French film critic told the world here was a director who could not be ignored. A herald of the French New Wave, he spoke a cinematic and literary language with a unique poetic vision that drew not only from his personal experience, but also literature and film.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Day for Night," Francois Truffaut's heartfelt homage to the joy and pain of making movies, is just as bracing yet touching as it was when it was first released 25 years ago. If anything, it has gained resonance because we are even further removed from the classic studio production to which Truffaut was bidding farewell--and also because it inevitably reminds us of the loss movie-lovers the world suffered when Truffaut died at 52 in 1984.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
"Francois Truffaut," said the French director Claude Miller during a recent visit to Los Angeles, "was there as a friendly ghost watching over us." A year before he died, in 1984 at the tragically young age of 52, Truffaut and Claude de Givray had completed a 35-page treatment of "The Little Thief," about a truant teen-age girl who is for all the world a sister in spirit to Antoine Doinel, the hero of Truffaut's "The 400 Blows." ("Little Thief" opens Friday at the Royal.
BOOKS
December 23, 2007 | Seth Greenland, Seth Greenland has written for film, television and theater. He is the author of the novel "The Bones."
Remember when your real estate agent was working on a screenplay? Or that one your cousin the accountant was writing? Or the script your dental hygienist was laboring on, which she pitched to you in its entirety while your mouth was wrapped in a dental dam so you couldn't politely beg her to shut up? Those days have mercifully ended. Now, aspiring writers in Southern California are abandoning their Final Draft software and thronging to the novel writing classes at UCLA Extension.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1988 | PAT H. BROESKE and DAVID PECCHIA
OK, this may take a few weeks to get through. It definitely took us a few weeks (and then some) to put together. Last year's Sneaks encompassed 362 titles. We thought that was a lot . This year we have managed to uncover 520 movies that are, for better or for worse, planned for release this year. That in itself does not necessarily mean that movies will be better than ever--or that there will be more movies than ever.
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