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Suzanne Vega

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2001 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a bloodied participant breathlessly confessing her own battlefield experiences, Suzanne Vega resembles a first-class TV news anchor reporting incisively on what goes on in the world around her. Although her first album in five years, the just-released "Songs in Red and Gray" marks a significant shift in her field of vision--from a window on the world outside to a mirror--she's still not coming out from behind her anchor desk to tell us what she's discovered.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2007 | Deborah Netburn
You could talk about: The summer of game shows continues. The newest addition is the Jimmy Kimmel-hosted "Set for Life" on ABC. The press release specifies that the show "does not require skill" and that "there are no questions to answer." Then there is some business about going up and down a ladder, which makes it sound like a grown-up version of syndicated classic "Fun House." (Friday) We'll talk about: The goddesses of alt-folk.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2001 | NATALIE NICHOLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even when she talked about characters such as the abused child "Luka" or places like "Tom's Diner," singer-songwriter Suzanne Vega's work always had an intimate feeling. Now, following several major shake-ups in Vega's life, the tunes on her new album, "Songs in Red and Gray," have come out more personal than ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2001 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a bloodied participant breathlessly confessing her own battlefield experiences, Suzanne Vega resembles a first-class TV news anchor reporting incisively on what goes on in the world around her. Although her first album in five years, the just-released "Songs in Red and Gray" marks a significant shift in her field of vision--from a window on the world outside to a mirror--she's still not coming out from behind her anchor desk to tell us what she's discovered.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1993 | RICHARD CROMELIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I've always felt like I'm between all these different worlds," says Suzanne Vega. It's easy to see why. The singer-songwriter grew up in a European/Puerto Rican household in East Harlem and other parts of upper Manhattan. When she was 9 she was told that the man she knew as her father was actually her stepfather, and that in fact she was not half Puerto Rican. Uprooted from her presumed heritage, she eventually took refuge from her cultural confusion in New York's mid-'70s folk music community.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since 1985, when Suzanne Vega's debut album helped uncork a still-rising stream of women making strong contributions to pop-rock song craft, interviewers have been probing for insights into the workings of her purposeful artistry. She is quite willing to oblige. But get her on the phone nowadays, and a cool, crisp explanation of how she arrived at this or that creative choice is apt to erupt suddenly in a geyser of exclamations. "Oh! You've got the puppy dog! You've got the banana too!"
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM
Suzanne Vega was far from commanding Tuesday night at the Coach House, but she put forward some thought-provoking paradoxes and delivered them in sufficiently varied musical wrappings to at least keep things interesting. The central paradox was Vega herself. The New York City songwriter, author of four albums of artful, literate pop with occasional folk underpinnings, is no natural performer.
NEWS
February 11, 1993 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A psychotic is a guy who's just discovered what's going on. --William F. Burroughs Folk singer Suzanne Vega is far from psychotic, but she knows what's going on. Many of her songs deal with the Big Issues, and her biggest hit, "Luka," from 1987 was about child abuse. Her latest, "99.9 Fahrenheit," deals with AIDS testing, transvestites and that old staple, lousy love.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1992 | JEAN ROSENBLUTH
You already know the artist as the Spalding Gray of folk music, a sort of dry, clever chronicler of life in the age of urban riots and sordid celebrity custody battles. Now meet Suzanne Vega the would-be Bangle, the sly flirt, the oracle of the underside. They're all here, the familiar and the fresh, on the New York singer's most wide-ranging and consistently brilliant effort to date.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1996
Tickets are on sale today for the Who's Oct. 25 date at the Pond of Anaheim for its "Quadrophenia" tour. . . . Coming up Nov. 4 at Cowboy Boogie in Anaheim is 14-year-old country sensation LeAnn Rimes. . . . The Galaxy Concert Theatre in Santa Ana has added shows with Paul Westerberg (Sept. 18) and Suzanne Vega (Nov. 21), with Vega also set for the Ventura Theatre on Nov. 22.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2001 | NATALIE NICHOLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even when she talked about characters such as the abused child "Luka" or places like "Tom's Diner," singer-songwriter Suzanne Vega's work always had an intimate feeling. Now, following several major shake-ups in Vega's life, the tunes on her new album, "Songs in Red and Gray," have come out more personal than ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1997
After making three albums with producer Don Was, Bonnie Raitt has finished recording her upcoming album, co-producing this time with Mitchell Froom and Tchad Blake, who have worked with Suzanne Vega, Crowded House and Los Lobos, among others. A release date has not yet been set. . . . The original members of X (Exene Cervenkova, John Doe, Billy Zoom and D.J. Bonebrake) are discussing a reunion for a tour after receiving interest from concert promoters.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since 1985, when Suzanne Vega's debut album helped uncork a still-rising stream of women making strong contributions to pop-rock song craft, interviewers have been probing for insights into the workings of her purposeful artistry. She is quite willing to oblige. But get her on the phone nowadays, and a cool, crisp explanation of how she arrived at this or that creative choice is apt to erupt suddenly in a geyser of exclamations. "Oh! You've got the puppy dog! You've got the banana too!"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1996 | ELYSA GARDNER
*** 1/2 SUZANNE VEGA "Nine Objects of Desire" A&M Maybe it has something to do with her falling in love and becoming a mom over the past few years, but Vega has never sounded warmer, wiser or sexier than she does on this album. Certainly, her musical partnership with husband-producer Mitchell Froom--whom Vega married after they worked together on her last LP, 1992's "99.9 F"--has been a factor in her growth.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1996
Tickets are on sale today for the Who's Oct. 25 date at the Pond of Anaheim for its "Quadrophenia" tour. . . . Coming up Nov. 4 at Cowboy Boogie in Anaheim is 14-year-old country sensation LeAnn Rimes. . . . The Galaxy Concert Theatre in Santa Ana has added shows with Paul Westerberg (Sept. 18) and Suzanne Vega (Nov. 21), with Vega also set for the Ventura Theatre on Nov. 22.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM
Shy Suzanne Vega wasn't riveting Tuesday at the Coach House, but she put forward enough thought-provoking paradoxes, and delivered them in sufficiently varied musical wrappings, to at least keep things interesting. The central paradox was Vega herself. The New York singer-songwriter, author of four albums of artful, literate pop with occasional folk underpinnings, is no natural performer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1997
After making three albums with producer Don Was, Bonnie Raitt has finished recording her upcoming album, co-producing this time with Mitchell Froom and Tchad Blake, who have worked with Suzanne Vega, Crowded House and Los Lobos, among others. A release date has not yet been set. . . . The original members of X (Exene Cervenkova, John Doe, Billy Zoom and D.J. Bonebrake) are discussing a reunion for a tour after receiving interest from concert promoters.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1989 | STEVE HOCHMAN
History: Born in the Black Hills town of Vermillion, S.D., Colvin was surrounded with the music of the late-'50s and early-'60s folk boom by her folk-fan father. Moving with her family first to London, Ontario, Canada and then Carbondale, Ill., Colvin sang and took up acting in high school and got her first paying singing gig at 19.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM
Suzanne Vega was far from commanding Tuesday night at the Coach House, but she put forward some thought-provoking paradoxes and delivered them in sufficiently varied musical wrappings to at least keep things interesting. The central paradox was Vega herself. The New York City songwriter, author of four albums of artful, literate pop with occasional folk underpinnings, is no natural performer.
NEWS
February 11, 1993 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A psychotic is a guy who's just discovered what's going on. --William F. Burroughs Folk singer Suzanne Vega is far from psychotic, but she knows what's going on. Many of her songs deal with the Big Issues, and her biggest hit, "Luka," from 1987 was about child abuse. Her latest, "99.9 Fahrenheit," deals with AIDS testing, transvestites and that old staple, lousy love.
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