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Suzzanne Douglas

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1994 | N. F. MENDOZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some might call it a schizophrenic childhood. Suzzanne Douglas--currently on both movie and television screens--says she spent her early years "dodging bullets and then running home and learning about the arts" from her mother, a single parent. Douglas believes her unusual upbringing in Chicago's South Side has added dimension to her work.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1994 | N. F. MENDOZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some might call it a schizophrenic childhood. Suzzanne Douglas--currently on both movie and television screens--says she spent her early years "dodging bullets and then running home and learning about the arts" from her mother, a single parent. Douglas believes her unusual upbringing in Chicago's South Side has added dimension to her work.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1994 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Inkwell" takes its title from a Martha's Vineyard beach, an African American enclave since the turn of the century. The film is at once a coming-of-age story, set in the summer of 1976, and a satire on the affectations of the black bourgeoisie.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1999
Theater "Dharma and Greg's" Jenna Elfman (above, with "Lateline's" Miguel Ferrer) headlines in Milton Katselas' "Visions and Lovers: Variations on a Theme," premiering today at the Skylight Theatre. The evening of two one-acts also features Suzzanne Douglas ("The Parent 'Hood") and Richard Lawson. * "Albee's People," selections from Edward Albee's works exploring the heights and depths of the human psyche, features two separate bills in repertory at the Old Globe Theatre in San Diego.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1995 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The happy, healthy, African American nuclear family--of a comfy middle class not too often emphasized in sitcoms since the exit of "Cosby"--gets its comedic chance again with "The Parent 'Hood," a Robert Townsend vehicle premiering tonight as part of the WB Network's initial rollout.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2003 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
"You measure a dog by how much sound he can make. A boy you measure by what he can do." That fatherly advice comes early in the new version of "Sounder," a family drama about quiet dignity airing Sunday night at 7 on ABC's "The Wonderful World of Disney." So how do you measure a remake? Many viewers will fondly recall the classic theatrical version of "Sounder," released in 1972.
NEWS
June 1, 1997 | LEE HARRIS, TIMES WRITER
On the family drama Second Noah (ABC, Sunday at 7 p.m.), Ricky (James Marsden) and Kaylie (Judith Jones) take Ben (Gemini) to Disney World so Kaylie can get to know the son she gave up for adoption. Meanwhile, Bethany (Zelda Harris) thinks she's found her biological father, Sweet Billy, played by guest star Ben Vereen. And Noah (Daniel Hugh Kelly) gets an offer to go on "Live With Regis & Kathie Lee" to promote his book. For the family.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1999 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Throughout "Visions and Lovers," two original one-acts about male-female relations, writer-director Milton Katselas worships devoutly if relentlessly at the shrine of the senses. In their sometimes confrontational, occasionally harmonious and always passionate exchanges, two pairs of actors writhe, whirl, conjoin and repel each other with the choreographed intensity of a Bob Fosse dance number.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1998 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
You could call it "Femmageddon." Or "The Jailbait Trap." Under any name "How Stella Got Her Groove Back" is a glossy, good-humored romantic fantasy directed as purposefully toward women as "The Parent Trap" is toward youngsters and "Armageddon" toward males.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1994 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Jason's Lyric" is a terribly earnest melodrama with king-size ambitions. Set in the inner cities of Houston, it bulges with biblical pretension. Joshua (Bokeem Woodbine) and Jason (Allen Payne) are the Cain and Abel of the piece. We first see them in flashback as two carefree lads romping in the fields with their doting dad (Forest Whitaker). But that was before he was shattered and deranged by Vietnam.
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | PAMELA MARIN, Pamela Marin is a regular contributor to Orange County Life.
Jewel kept her cool. Through a long cocktail hour of hugs and kisses and flashing strobes. Through a dinner she barely had a chance to eat for all the table-hoppers stopping by to chat. And through the speeches--more than 20 of them, lasting more than an hour. Her voice didn't crack once when it was her turn at the podium. On Sunday at the Disneyland Hotel, Cal State Fullerton President Jewel Plummer Cobb told the nearly 600 guests attending her retirement banquet: "I have had a ball."
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