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Sven Nykvist

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
The other evening, as part of AFI Fest and of New Sweden 88, which is celebrating the 350th anniversary of the first Swedish settlements in America, I shared the podium with the great cinematographer Sven Nykvist. There were clips from Ingmar Bergman's "Cries and Whispers" and "Fanny and Alexander" (both Oscar-winning achievements for Nykvist) and from "Pretty Baby," the remake of "The Postman Always Rings Twice," "The Unbearable Lightness of Being" and the late Andrei Tarkovsky's "Sacrifice."
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OPINION
September 22, 2006
A DIRECTOR MAY REPRESENT the heart of a motion picture, but the soul of a movie belongs to the cinematographer. Sven Nykvist, who died Wednesday at 83 in his native Sweden, was arguably the most important cinematographer in the history of filmmaking.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2006 | Chris Lee, Times Staff Writer
Sven Nykvist, the Oscar-winning cinematographer and filmmaker whose naturalistic, straightforward camera work distinguished the movies of directors Ingmar Bergman and Woody Allen, died Wednesday. He was 83. Nykvist had battled a long illness and was being treated for aphasia, a form of dementia, at a nursing home in Sweden, his son, Carl-Gustaf Nykvist, told the Associated Press.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2006 | Chris Lee, Times Staff Writer
Sven Nykvist, the Oscar-winning cinematographer and filmmaker whose naturalistic, straightforward camera work distinguished the movies of directors Ingmar Bergman and Woody Allen, died Wednesday. He was 83. Nykvist had battled a long illness and was being treated for aphasia, a form of dementia, at a nursing home in Sweden, his son, Carl-Gustaf Nykvist, told the Associated Press.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the opening moments of Sven Nykvist's "The Ox" (Westside Pavilion), a flawless film of strength and calm, we witness the most rigid of moral codes crumpling in the face of overpowering hunger. On Christmas, 1867, in a profoundly devout rural Swedish community, Helge (Stellan Skarsgard), a young tenant farmer, peers out a windowpane ringed with frost and sees an ox belonging to his employer Svenning (Lennart Hjulstrom). Moments later he takes a sledgehammer to the animal.
OPINION
September 22, 2006
A DIRECTOR MAY REPRESENT the heart of a motion picture, but the soul of a movie belongs to the cinematographer. Sven Nykvist, who died Wednesday at 83 in his native Sweden, was arguably the most important cinematographer in the history of filmmaking.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1989 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Andrei Tarkovsky once said that each man contains a universe within himself, and no director illuminated that universe with more imagination or rigor. Tarkovsky, who died of cancer at 54 in Paris on the last day of 1986, made only seven features in his 24-year career, but each of them is astonishing in the often surreal power of their vision. Tarkovsky had an abiding preoccupation with the memory as the the great shaping force of the individual psyche. He also said that the purpose of our lives was to develop ourselves spiritually, and he believed that the function of art was to serve that purpose.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2003
Surveyed to name the 10 most influential cinematographers in film history, members of the International Cinematographers Guild came up with 11 (thanks to a tie). Their choices: Billy Bitzer ("Birth of a Nation"), James Wong Howe ("The Rose Tattoo"), Gregg Toland ("Wuthering Heights"), Freddie Young ("Lawrence of Arabia"), Jordan Cronenweth ("Blade Runner"), Conrad L.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1992
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will hold its annual foreign-language film award nominees symposium Saturday from 10 a.m. to noon at the academy's Samuel Goldwyn Theater in its headquarters, 8949 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills. The symposium, which honors the five films nominated for Oscars in the foreign-language film category, is open to the public free of charge.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the opening moments of Sven Nykvist's "The Ox" (Westside Pavilion), a flawless film of strength and calm, we witness the most rigid of moral codes crumpling in the face of overpowering hunger. On Christmas, 1867, in a profoundly devout rural Swedish community, Helge (Stellan Skarsgard), a young tenant farmer, peers out a windowpane ringed with frost and sees an ox belonging to his employer Svenning (Lennart Hjulstrom). Moments later he takes a sledgehammer to the animal.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1989 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Andrei Tarkovsky once said that each man contains a universe within himself, and no director illuminated that universe with more imagination or rigor. Tarkovsky, who died of cancer at 54 in Paris on the last day of 1986, made only seven features in his 24-year career, but each of them is astonishing in the often surreal power of their vision. Tarkovsky had an abiding preoccupation with the memory as the the great shaping force of the individual psyche. He also said that the purpose of our lives was to develop ourselves spiritually, and he believed that the function of art was to serve that purpose.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
The other evening, as part of AFI Fest and of New Sweden 88, which is celebrating the 350th anniversary of the first Swedish settlements in America, I shared the podium with the great cinematographer Sven Nykvist. There were clips from Ingmar Bergman's "Cries and Whispers" and "Fanny and Alexander" (both Oscar-winning achievements for Nykvist) and from "Pretty Baby," the remake of "The Postman Always Rings Twice," "The Unbearable Lightness of Being" and the late Andrei Tarkovsky's "Sacrifice."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
"Stand and Deliver," the story of how an East Los Angeles math teacher inspired his Latino students to national honors, swept the field, winning six of the 10 categories at the Independent Spirit Awards held Saturday afternoon at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel. The Warner Bros. release was honored as best picture as well as for its direction and screenplay by Ramon Menendez. Edward James Olmos, Lou Diamond Phillips and Rosanna De Soto also won for their acting performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1989
The American Society of Cinematographers has selected nominees for the third annual ASC Awards to be given March 5 at the Beverly Hilton. In the theatrical features category, the nominees are Peter Biziou ("Mississippi Burning"), Conrad Hall ("Tequila Sunrise"), Sven Nykvist ("The Unbearable Lightness of Being"), Philippe Rousselot ("Dangerous Liaisons") and John Seale ("Rain Man").
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