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Svetlana Ogorodnikova

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1989
A Los Angeles federal judge Monday barred government efforts to deport two convicted Soviet spys, clearing the way for them to testify in the upcoming retrial of Richard Miller, the only FBI agent ever charged with espionage. U.S. District Court Judge Robert M. Takasugi ruled that Miller has a right to call Svetlana Ogorodnikova and her husband, Nikolai, as witnesses in his third trial in April, 1990.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1995 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once asked to describe his former lover, ex-FBI agent and convicted spy Richard W. Miller replied that Svetlana Ogorodnikova was "charming, outgoing, vivacious" and that she spoke atrocious English. After 11 years in prison on espionage charges, Ogorodnikova still speaks fractured English. But the charm and vivacity are in little evidence.
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NEWS
February 10, 1987
Convicted Soviet spy Svetlana Ogorodnikova, serving an 18-year federal prison sentence in Pleasanton for espionage conspiracy, announced in an "open letter to President Reagan" that she has begun a hunger strike to protest alleged refusal to supply proper medical treatment by prison officials. "Since my imprisonment my health condition has deteriorated greatly," she wrote. "I have become sick with pneumonia, bronchitis, plurisy (sic), my kidney, breast, etc. I have received no medication.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1990
A federal judge is expected to hear closing arguments today in the case of Richard W. Miller, who is accused of passing secret documents to his Soviet lover. The decision by U.S. District Judge Robert Takasugi, who is hearing the case in Los Angeles, on whether to convict Miller comes at the end of the ex-agent's third trial. It is likely to put an end to the 6-year-old case that has been an embarrassment to the FBI.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1990
A federal judge is expected to hear closing arguments today in the case of Richard W. Miller, who is accused of passing secret documents to his Soviet lover. The decision by U.S. District Judge Robert Takasugi, who is hearing the case in Los Angeles, on whether to convict Miller comes at the end of the ex-agent's third trial. It is likely to put an end to the 6-year-old case that has been an embarrassment to the FBI.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1985 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
A court-appointed psychiatrist for Svetlana Ogorodnikova, who is accused of being a Soviet spy, was granted a national security clearance Thursday to examine secret FBI files, which her attorneys hope to use as part of a limited insanity defense in her pending espionage trial. Disclosure of the government's action was made to U.S. District Judge David V. Kenyon by Ogorodnikova's lawyers after weeks of closed court sessions in Los Angeles relating to her possible mental and emotional problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1985 | LINDA DEUTSCH, Associated Press Writer
A federal prosecutor told jurors Tuesday that he would prove that former FBI Agent Richard W. Miller was "a disgruntled and vulnerable American" who became easy prey for a Soviet woman who lured him into espionage. U.S. Atty. Robert Bonner, in an opening statement at Miller's spy trial in federal court in Los Angeles, said the Soviets set out to recruit an FBI agent and found in Miller a man who was open to offers of sex and money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1986 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
In a major strategy shift, the prosecution in the espionage retrial of Richard W. Miller has rejuggled its witness list to avoid calling one of its most controversial witnesses--former FBI Agent John Hunt--early in the trial. U.S. Atty. Robert C. Bonner gave no explanation for the decision, but Hunt's testimony in the first trial was cited by jurors as one of the reasons for a jury deadlock last November.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1985 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
Former FBI Agent Richard W. Miller, the government's star witness in the trial of accused Soviet spies Svetlana and Nikolai Ogorodnikov, is expected to take the witness stand early this week to recount the events that led to his own arrest as the first FBI agent ever charged with espionage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1995 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once asked to describe his former lover, ex-FBI agent and convicted spy Richard W. Miller replied that Svetlana Ogorodnikova was "charming, outgoing, vivacious" and that she spoke atrocious English. After 11 years in prison on espionage charges, Ogorodnikova still speaks fractured English. But the charm and vivacity are in little evidence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1990 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of his third trial for spying, former FBI agent Richard W. Miller testified Tuesday during a pretrial hearing that he confessed to passing a secret bureau manual to the Soviet Union because he was trying hard to please the fellow agents who were interrogating him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He scrounges for a living, making it on $97 a month worth of food stamps and some welfare cash for other living expenses. His beat-up 15-year-old Toyota, bought at a bargain basement price of $300, needed mechanical work that cost more than the car. He lives in a frayed, one-bedroom apartment in West Hollywood, where he pays $306 a month rent. His new job, driving a passenger van for a hotel, pays $5.50 an hour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for Richard W. Miller claimed in court documents Thursday that espionage charges pending against the former FBI agent should be dismissed because of prosecutorial misconduct. In a motion filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, Miller's lawyers contended that his constitutional rights were violated because the government had systematically suppressed evidence that could have exonerated Miller. The defense also contended that FBI Director William S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1989
A Los Angeles federal judge Monday barred government efforts to deport two convicted Soviet spys, clearing the way for them to testify in the upcoming retrial of Richard Miller, the only FBI agent ever charged with espionage. U.S. District Court Judge Robert M. Takasugi ruled that Miller has a right to call Svetlana Ogorodnikova and her husband, Nikolai, as witnesses in his third trial in April, 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his first interview since being released from prison, former FBI agent Richard Miller said Thursday that he never gave secret information to a Soviet spy and hopes to be cleared next spring when his case comes to trial for the third time. Miller, the first FBI agent ever accused of espionage, was released on $337,000 bail from a federal prison Oct. 30 after his conviction was overturned by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals.
NEWS
November 23, 1989 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawyers for Richard W. Miller, the former FBI agent accused of selling secrets to the Soviet KGB during an adulterous affair with a Soviet emigre, said they will ask a judge to block attempts to deport the woman and her husband. Both Svetlana Ogorodnikova and her husband, Nikolai Ogorodnikov, are serving prison terms after pleading guilty to espionage charges, but the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles has said that the husband could be released and face deportation as early as Jan. 4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1990 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of his third trial for spying, former FBI agent Richard W. Miller testified Tuesday during a pretrial hearing that he confessed to passing a secret bureau manual to the Soviet Union because he was trying hard to please the fellow agents who were interrogating him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1986 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
Comparing former FBI Agent Richard W. Miller to an unsuccessful real-life version of a Clint Eastwood-type movie hero, a defense lawyer maintained Tuesday that the accused Soviet spy was engaged in a maverick double-agent operation when he became involved two years ago with Russian emigre Svetlana Ogorodnikova.
NEWS
August 26, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
The federal government's bid for a rehearing on a decision to grant a new trial for Richard W. Miller, an FBI agent whose love affair with a Soviet spy landed him in federal prison for two life terms, was denied Friday by the U.S. 9th Circuit of Appeals. The decision means that the matter will likely be appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court. Appellate Judge Dorothy W. Nelson was joined by Judges Stephen Reinhardt and Diarmuid F. O'Scannlain in unanimously rejecting the government's request.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1989 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
A proposal that convicted Soviet spy Richard W. Miller be released from prison on $450,000 bond while awaiting a possible third espionage trial was taken under consideration Wednesday by a Los Angeles federal judge. "The court is not so sure how it will rule," said U.S. District Judge David V. Kenyon. "I will sleep on it. Let it sink in overnight." The recommendation for the release of Miller, 52, a former FBI agent who was sentenced to two life prison terms plus 50 years for passing a secret FBI document to the Soviet Union, was made by Val T. Howard, an investigator for the pretrial services section of the U.S. District Court.
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