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TRAVEL
January 26, 1986
On your next vacation to England, learn a valuable and interesting art. In two short weeks, learn all there is to know, with hands-on experience, about invisible china mending. The course covers everything from gluing and sticking, to the making of missing pieces and finishing with an airbrush. Classes are limited to six people, so that close individual attention is given. For a complete brochure, write to The China Restore Studio, 25 Acfold Road, London SW6 3SP, England. The cost of the course is 620. SUSAN E. SHELTON Beverly Hills
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SPORTS
January 29, 2005 | Lisa Dillman, Times Staff Writer
This wasn't a game of two halves, but rather, a game of two selves. The injured impostor portraying Serena Williams was slow-moving, slow-serving and almost couldn't keep a ball in play during the first set of the Australian Open final. Sets 2 and 3 featured the tenacious Serena Williams, the one who dominated the sport a couple of years ago. Confusion reigned at Rod Laver Arena. And ultimately, so did the second Serena.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2010 | By Maura Dolan
The Proposition 8 same-sex marriage trial that starts today can be watched live at federal courthouses in Pasadena, San Francisco, Portland, Ore., Seattle and Brooklyn, N.Y. The broadcast is expected to start at 8:30 a.m. Public access at remote viewing locations will be on a first-come basis. No photographs or recordings of the broadcast will be permitted. The trial is expected to last about three weeks. Video of the trial also will be available on YouTube.com, and the nonprofit group that launched the lawsuit said it would provide updates on its website, www.equalrightsfoundation.
NEWS
February 5, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
England's Alton Towers is set to unleash the latest salvo in its arsenal of Secret Weapon roller coasters in March 2013 with the addition of a $29-million "world's first" ride aimed squarely at thrill-seekers. PHOTOS: Secret Weapon 7 (SW7) coaster at Alton Towers The United Kingdom theme park recently submitted plans to the local planning district that show a compact track layout with numerous inversions and several subterranean sections. Coaster fans have already converted the submitted plans into highly detailed concept art and animated videos . Alton Park has released few details about the new coaster, codenamed Secret Weapon 7 or SW7 for short, other than to say the two minute and 45 second ride will feature an initial drop of 98 feet and cover more than 3,800 feet of track while topping 50 mph. The custom track layout appears to feature at least eight inversions (with as many as 11, by some accounts)
TRAVEL
April 13, 1997 | JOHN McKINNEY
Back in 1905, a Portland mayor proposed that alternate streets be razed and then planted with trees and roses. Instead, landowners bequeathed wooded areas to the city on the condition that no wheeled vehicle ever violate the sanctity of these preserves. Portland decided to emphasize its land, not its port. The city marshaled its resources, natural and human, to make this most bountiful land a most livable city.
SPORTS
September 4, 1994 | From Associated Press
Scott Blanton kicked a 48-yard field goal with 11 seconds to play and No. 16 Oklahoma, which blew a 24-point lead, came back to beat Syracuse, 30-29, Saturday night at Syracuse, N.Y. Oklahoma led, 24-0, and was all set to celebrate another touchdown as P.J. Mills neared the goal line at the end of a 70-yard pass play. But cornerback Bryce Bevill, beaten on the reception, ran down Mills inside the five and popped the ball loose. It went through the end zone for a touchback.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1998 | CHRISTOPHER SULLIVAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Every five days in America, a child is killed on the job. For 14-year-old Alexis Jaimes, that day was June 7, 1997. The moment was 9:34 that Saturday morning on a construction site in this Gulf Coast town. As Alexis bent over to move hydraulic lines for the pile-driving crane he worked beneath, its 5,000-pound hammer broke loose and fell on him. Frozen by the sight of the boy's broken body, his back, legs and ribs crushed, a co-worker could only tell police, "It happened very quickly."
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