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NEWS
August 16, 2000 | From Associated Press
An 83-year-old woman was found alive in her car Tuesday, three days after it crashed off a bridge into a snake-infested swamp. She told rescuers she was able to survive by collecting rainwater. Tillie Tooter's car was discovered by a member of a road cleanup crew who noticed mashed-down trees beside the Interstate 595 bridge over the swamp and stopped to check. Justin Vannelli spotted her car 40 feet down. "I saw someone moving inside there, so I called the cops," Vannelli said.
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SPORTS
March 27, 2014 | By Chris Foster
MEMPHIS, Tenn. - Out of the mouths of Bruin babes. UCLA freshmen Zach LaVine and Bryce Alford decompressed in the locker room, a long day of chasing without reward over. LaVine looked up at Alford and said, "Man, no more games. No practice tomorrow. No meetings. It's just over. " Alford just nodded. Finality gave clarity even to the young. UCLA could go this far and no further. BOX SCORE: Florida 79, UCLA 68 Florida was bigger, deeper, more experienced. Florida was ready to move on. A 79-68 victory over UCLA in FedEx Forum on Thursday made that clear.
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NEWS
April 7, 1987 | United Press International
Senate Democratic leader Robert C. Byrd suggested today that the United States move the Soviet Embassy in Washington to a swamp full of alligators. Byrd, deeply disturbed by the Soviet spying in the U.S. Embassy in Moscow and apparent large-scale deployment of eavesdropping equipment built into the new U.S. Embassy still under construction, said Monday the United States faced an "alarming security sieve." Asked today whether he agreed with a suggestion from Rep. William S. Broomfield (R-Mich.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2013 | By Chad Terhune
California's health exchange is struggling to keep pace with a surge of applicants who are encountering long waits and website problems as they try to meet a Dec. 23 deadline. In response to higher-than-expected demand, the Covered California exchange said it is adding staff and expanding its capacity to answer consumer calls. It received 17,000 calls in less than an hour Wednesday, more than it received in an entire day in recent weeks. The exchange is also trying to dig through a backlog of 25,000 paper applications filed in October and November.
OPINION
March 22, 1998
Re "Washington Seeks Moral High Ground," March 16: Washington was built on a swamp and things haven't changed. RICHARD HEIN Fullerton
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1996
No politician should ever condemn another politician for ethics violations. They all have their feet stuck in the mud of the same swamp. BOB OLSEN Hemet
NEWS
September 25, 1988 | ANTOINE MOUYAMBALA, Reuters
A thin asphalt ribbon cuts through dense jungle and swamp linking three thriving towns on Congo's Ubangui River before disappearing into the northern tropical rain forest. Congo is proud of the $145-million two-lane road connecting Epena, Impfondo and Dongou, but the only way to reach the area is by river or air.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2006
CARINA CHOCANO wrote a great article on critics versus marketing and public attendance ["It's Critics vs. the Hype (Not the Audience)," Aug. 20]. The fact that marketing has dumbed down young audiences to swamp "Pirates of the Caribbean 2" does not make it a good movie. It's not even a good bad movie. It is a ludicrously inept film. Money does not a good movie make. RICK EDELSTEIN Los Angeles I'VE always admired and respected Chocano's film commentary. However, her writing today about critics and marketing in the film industry is nothing short of brilliant.
TRAVEL
December 6, 2009
If you go The 26th National Cowboy Poetry Gathering will take place Jan. 23 to 30 at various venues in Elko, Nev. This year, Seminole Indian cowboys from Florida and swamp cowboys from Louisiana will be among the participants. For more information and to buy tickets, contact the Western Folklife Center at (775) 738-7508 or www.westernfolklife.org. Room reservations are essential during the gathering. For information, contact the Elko Convention & Visitors Authority at (800)
BOOKS
September 21, 1986 | Daniel Akst, Akst is a Times staff writer.
Reading Paul Guernsey's uneven but vividly imagined first novel, it's difficult to shake the nagging feeling that this is a young adults' book directed at grown-ups because of the sex, dope and violence it contains. Set in rural Connecticut, it is the story of a likable 17-year-old struggling to cope with a set of misfortunes dire enough to try the patience of Job, no less the troubled Moreno clan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2013 | Steve Lopez
Andrew Fabella, are you out there? Please report to post-op at Keck Hospital of USC early Monday morning. I'm coming back to have the other knee done. That's right, folks, I'm kicking off the new year by getting a partial right knee replacement because my medial cartilage is cottage cheese and I'm bone on bone, just like I was on the left knee. I need to be in top shape this year because I've got mayoral candidates to chase and a 9-year-old daughter who's already too much for me to handle on the tennis courts.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
It was only a matter of time before the found footage craze drew a bona-fide name-brand Hollywood filmmaker into its ongoing vortex. "The Bay" is directed by the Oscar-winning Barry Levinson, known for his longstanding connection to the city of Baltimore through such films as "Diner. " This time Levinson checks in on the small seaside town of Claridge, Md., on the Chesapeake Bay, with a story recounting an ecological horror show that (fictionally) occurred on July 4, 2009, and was subsequently covered up. As pieced together in a Wikileaks-style information dump, the local water, described as a "toxic soup" of radioactivity and growth hormones from chicken excrement, has become suddenly infested with rapidly growing isopods that take host inside people and work their way out. The story becomes more ridiculous as it escalates, the film's over-determined ecological focus undermining any real horror movie tension.
NEWS
September 25, 2012 | By Melanie Mason
Undisclosed political money is playing an outsize role in the 2012 election cycle. But as some political donors are seeking to hide their identities, a new study has found that at least one set of contributors - corporations - is increasingly opting for transparency when it comes to their political spending. The study, released Tuesday by the nonpartisan Center for Political Accountability and the Zicklin Center for Business Ethics Research at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, examined the top 200 companies in the S&P 500 and found that that almost 60% of them are disclosing at least some of their political activity.
NATIONAL
August 31, 2012 | Tina Susman
Michael Turner was sitting on his porch when the lake roared in. Hurricane Isaac had not even made landfall, but suddenly water was roaring like a big-river rapid through the neighborhood, swallowing streets that had never seen such flooding, not even after Hurricane Katrina. "It was like a wave," Turner said Thursday as boats plied the still-submerged neighborhood of River Forest in St. John the Baptist Parish, about 30 miles northwest of New Orleans. Some residents here suspect the improved, post-Katrina levee system that protected New Orleans during Isaac may have contributed to their misery by pushing more water back into nearby Lake Pontchartrain.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
A Kansas community is mourning the loss of an entire family -- a prominent businessman, his wife and their four children -- killed when their plane crashed into Florida swampland. The victims of the Thursday afternoon crash were Ronald Bramlage, 45, his wife, Rebecca, 43, and their four children -- Brandon, Boston, Beau and Roxanne -- who ranged in age from 8 to 15, according to the Polk County Sheriff's Office  in Florida. The family was returning home from the Bahamas to Kansas, and Ronald Bramlage was piloting the aircraft, officials said.
SPORTS
April 20, 2012 | By Mike Bresnahan
Kobe Bryant was back on the court. The Lakers barely joined him. The San Antonio Spurs knocked them around for the second time this week, drubbing them Friday night, 121-97, at AT&T Center. Tony Parker annoyed them to no end (again), thoroughly outplaying Ramon Sessions as the Lakers' lead over the Clippers fell to half a game in the push for third place in the Western Conference. Bryant wasn't the problem after missing seven games because of a sore left shin. He scored 18 points on seven-for-12 shooting after leaving his pleasant perch from the Lakers' bench as an unofficial assistant coach.
OPINION
October 22, 1989
I read with interest Carol McGraw's article ("Abortion Protest Cases May Swamp Courts," Metro, Oct. 3) but unfortunately it totally misses the point. Our criminal justice system is already swamped, and every day dangerous felons are either never arrested or never brought to trial because of this. The real question in the light of this situation is how Los Angeles police found the time to make over 800 arrests, while using arm-breaking force, of peaceful demonstrators and how the prosecutor's office finds the time to try each case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1987
Let's not be beastly to the royals. For myself, I'm all on the side of King Carlos III. It would be very ungrateful of me if I were not, seeing that he sheltered me for many years in the city he ordained, El Pueblo de la Reina de Los Angeles, and for several weeks in the palace he built at Caserta when he was King of Naples and the Two Sicilies. During World War II the royal palace at Caserta was headquarters for the Mediterranean Allied Air Forces in Italy. But some GIs were not kind to the palace and its furnishings, so everyone was ordered out of the palace and into a tent city set up in a nearby swamp.
NEWS
February 3, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Swamps aren't very sexy. Dank places filled with slithering creatures don't scream tourism, unless you're from Louisiana. So how would one fare in New York City? "Swamps in Louisiana have tremendous adventure-travel opportunities," says Lt. Gov. Jay Dardenne. On Wednesday, he flew to un-gator-like Manhattan to oversee the installation of a 12,100-cubic-foot re-creation of a Louisiana swamp built inside the city's bustling Chelsea Market. The exhibit is free and might be a good way to sample the bayou before going to visit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Faced with crushing bills, a tiny Kern County town that became infamous for aggressive law enforcement has eliminated its police department. "Maricopa just does not have the money to run a professional department," said Eric Ziegler, a retired city manager who advises the City Council. "It wasn't because of any particular feeling that there had been wrongdoing. " Officials in the town of 1,200 are considering the sale of the department's last remnants: four patrol vehicles — all bought used years ago — and two motorcycles.
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