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Swamp Thing

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1992 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
How awful can television get? And how distinctive? Well. . . . He looks like he was used to drag the muddy bottom of a bayou. Either that or something your dog or cat threw up on the rug. He's a watery, spongy, mossy mess of stringy vegetation, matted fungus and green ooze. Yet beneath this icky exterior, thumps a heart of gold. There are many reasons to watch cable television. "Swamp Thing"--prime-time's slime with a social conscience--doesn't appear to be one of them. Not on the surface.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1995 | Robert A. Jones
Time was, the crow bothered no one. It dwelled in sweet harmony with other creatures of L.A.'s suburban forests. Oh, a family of crows might invade your back yard for a week, taunting the cats, strutting their stuff on the telephone wires, but then they took off. The crow seemed to know its place, and stayed in it. No more. Biologically speaking, something has gotten twisted in our urban woodlands and the crow has grown into the city's monster bird. Like a Swamp Thing, except with wings.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1995 | Robert A. Jones
Time was, the crow bothered no one. It dwelled in sweet harmony with other creatures of L.A.'s suburban forests. Oh, a family of crows might invade your back yard for a week, taunting the cats, strutting their stuff on the telephone wires, but then they took off. The crow seemed to know its place, and stayed in it. No more. Biologically speaking, something has gotten twisted in our urban woodlands and the crow has grown into the city's monster bird. Like a Swamp Thing, except with wings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1992
Political pundits promised an October surprise, but who could have predicted this B movie finish? We have the irony of George Bush, "Old Broken Lips," caught lying about selling nuclear and chemical weapons technology to Saddam Hussein. Next, we see the pathos of "The Three-Billion-Dollar Man," Perot, shouting his paranoid delusions like a street lunatic on the lawn of City Hall. In the concluding scene, a true Hollywood triumph, Bill Clinton, covered with campaign muck like "The Swamp Thing," convinces Orange County Republicans to hold their noses and vote for him. I can hardly wait for the sequel.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1989 | Pat H. Broeske \f7
Adrienne Barbeau exchanged meaningful gazes with the half-man, half-plant creature in "Swamp Thing," but Swampy goes much further with Heather Locklear in Miramax's "The Return of Swamp Thing," which sprouts in theaters this Friday . Get ready for an inter-species romance, warns director Jim Wynorski. The animal/vegetable coupling comes when Swampy (played by a leafy Dick Durlock) pulls a small yam-like tuber off his body and offers it to Locklear to eat. Next thing you know, they're in a trance--and Locklear finds herself in the arms of a handsome man. When the altered state ends, she asks Swampy sighingly, "Was it real?"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1989 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
In "The Return of Swamp Thing" (citywide), the film makers strike a historic blow against censorship: the first instance ever of sex between humans and vegetables in a PG-rated movie. Their audacity knows no bounds. "Dynasty's" Heather Locklear, looking pouty, blond and busty, stares at Dick Durock in his full "Swamp Thing" regalia--an outfit full of squiggly green growths and bulging, broccoli-like deltoids--and gives him her best come-Heather smirk. Startled, the Thing protests: "It wouldn't work.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1988 | PAT H. BROESKE
In the tradition of The Great Hollywood Sequel comes . . . "The Return of Swamp Thing"! The latest adventures of the half-man, half-thing (debut: 1982) will be co-written/directed by prolific Jim Wynorski, late of "Deathstalker II," "Big Bad Mama II" and the "Not of This Earth" remake. Speaking from Georgia, where he was location-scouting, Wynorski said the new plot finds Swamp Thing trying to regain his "normalcy." Meanwhile, nemesis Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1992
Political pundits promised an October surprise, but who could have predicted this B movie finish? We have the irony of George Bush, "Old Broken Lips," caught lying about selling nuclear and chemical weapons technology to Saddam Hussein. Next, we see the pathos of "The Three-Billion-Dollar Man," Perot, shouting his paranoid delusions like a street lunatic on the lawn of City Hall. In the concluding scene, a true Hollywood triumph, Bill Clinton, covered with campaign muck like "The Swamp Thing," convinces Orange County Republicans to hold their noses and vote for him. I can hardly wait for the sequel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1985 | HERBERT J. VIDA
In the Fountain Valley store called Oohs and Ahs where Mr. Fantastic, Invisible Woman, the Thing and Human Torch hang out with hundreds of other comic book characters such as Swamp Thing and X-Men, it seems that John Fulce, 34, has found his calling. A one-time landscape architect, he is the keeper of 250,000 comic books, most selling for the bottom price of 75 cents each, but some that go for thousands of dollars.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1992 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
How awful can television get? And how distinctive? Well. . . . He looks like he was used to drag the muddy bottom of a bayou. Either that or something your dog or cat threw up on the rug. He's a watery, spongy, mossy mess of stringy vegetation, matted fungus and green ooze. Yet beneath this icky exterior, thumps a heart of gold. There are many reasons to watch cable television. "Swamp Thing"--prime-time's slime with a social conscience--doesn't appear to be one of them. Not on the surface.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1989 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
In "The Return of Swamp Thing" (citywide), the film makers strike a historic blow against censorship: the first instance ever of sex between humans and vegetables in a PG-rated movie. Their audacity knows no bounds. "Dynasty's" Heather Locklear, looking pouty, blond and busty, stares at Dick Durock in his full "Swamp Thing" regalia--an outfit full of squiggly green growths and bulging, broccoli-like deltoids--and gives him her best come-Heather smirk. Startled, the Thing protests: "It wouldn't work.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1989 | Pat H. Broeske \f7
Adrienne Barbeau exchanged meaningful gazes with the half-man, half-plant creature in "Swamp Thing," but Swampy goes much further with Heather Locklear in Miramax's "The Return of Swamp Thing," which sprouts in theaters this Friday . Get ready for an inter-species romance, warns director Jim Wynorski. The animal/vegetable coupling comes when Swampy (played by a leafy Dick Durlock) pulls a small yam-like tuber off his body and offers it to Locklear to eat. Next thing you know, they're in a trance--and Locklear finds herself in the arms of a handsome man. When the altered state ends, she asks Swampy sighingly, "Was it real?"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1988 | PAT H. BROESKE
In the tradition of The Great Hollywood Sequel comes . . . "The Return of Swamp Thing"! The latest adventures of the half-man, half-thing (debut: 1982) will be co-written/directed by prolific Jim Wynorski, late of "Deathstalker II," "Big Bad Mama II" and the "Not of This Earth" remake. Speaking from Georgia, where he was location-scouting, Wynorski said the new plot finds Swamp Thing trying to regain his "normalcy." Meanwhile, nemesis Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1985 | HERBERT J. VIDA
In the Fountain Valley store called Oohs and Ahs where Mr. Fantastic, Invisible Woman, the Thing and Human Torch hang out with hundreds of other comic book characters such as Swamp Thing and X-Men, it seems that John Fulce, 34, has found his calling. A one-time landscape architect, he is the keeper of 250,000 comic books, most selling for the bottom price of 75 cents each, but some that go for thousands of dollars.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1990
"More people are telling me they've seen a movie of mine on video than have seen it in a theater. I would say that home video has extended the audience for my films by at least half. . . . If I had to depend on theatrical showings, nobody would have known about 'The Hills Have Eyes,' 'Last House on the Left' and 'Swamp Thing.' " --Director Wes Craven in Video Review.
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